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Christopher George Sylvain / Ellen Sheffield Wilds


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Christopher George Sylvain / Ellen Sheffield Wilds

Husband: Christopher George Sylvain
Born: at: 
Died:at: 
Father:  at: 
Mother:  at: 
Wife: Ellen Sheffield Wilds
Born: at: 
Died:at: 
Father:  at: 
Mother:  at: 
Children
Name: Ian Gordon Lea Delaney [4536]
Born: at:
Died: at:
Spouses:


Pedigree Chart for: Christopher George Sylvain

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Christopher George  Sylvain 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Ellen Sheffield Wilds

      /--
   /--Robert Henry  Wilds  Sr.
   |  \--
/--Preston Lea  Wilds 
|  |  /--Sheffield  Phelps 
|  \--Eleanor Sheffield  Phelps 
|     \--Claudia Wright  Lea 
|--Ellen Sheffield  Wilds 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Nancy Jean  Alexander 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

[4809] This person is presumed living.

[4508] This person is presumed living.

[4536] This person is presumed living.

@1 [14409] [S371]

  • @4Data:
    Date of Import: Jul 6, 2000

@1 [14410] [S371]

  • @4Data:
    Date of Import: Jul 6, 2000

Elijah Sparks / Judah (Judith) Humphries

Husband: Elijah Sparks
Born: 1770at:
Married: ABT 1794at:
Died: 1832at:
Father:
Mother:
Wife: Judah (Judith) Humphries
Born: 7 Mar 1776at: Stephens Co., Georgia, USA
Died: 2 Dec 1862at: Franklin Co., Georgia, USA
Father: Joseph Humphries Jr.
Mother: Rebecca Phelps
Notes: [7183]
Sources: [7184]
Children

Pedigree Chart for: Elijah Sparks

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Elijah  Sparks 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Judah (Judith) Humphries

      /--
   /--Joseph  Humphries 
   |  \--
/--Joseph  Humphries  Jr.
|  |  /--
|  \--Elizabeth  Tignor 
|     \--
|--Judah (Judith)  Humphries 
|     /--Jonathan  Phelps 
|  /--Jonathan  Phelps 
|  |  \--Hannah   
\--Rebecca  Phelps 
   |  /--Jonathan  Phelps 
   \--Elizabeth  Tomes 
      \--

[7183] From notes by John Bates (January 1998): "Judith Sparks was 84 years of age on the 1860 Franklin Co., GA census... After her husband Elijah Sparks died in 1832, Judith, apparently well educated..., continued to handle family business transactions, deeds, taxes, etc. in Franklin Co., GA."

@1 [7184] [S44]

John Delustershul / (--?--)

Husband: John Delustershul
Born: at:
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Wife: (--?--)
Children
Name: Elizabeth Cricklade
Born: 1395at: Fernham, Berkshire, England
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Spouses: Nicholas Samborne III


Pedigree Chart for: John Delustershul

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--John  Delustershul 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Cyrus Minor Avery / Minnie Evalena Bartholemew

Husband: Cyrus Minor Avery
Born: 19 Jun 1846at: May 29, 1899
Married: 4 Oct 1877at: Knox Cty, Illinois
Died: 15 Sep 1905[10742] at: Galesburg, Knox, Illinois, United States
Father: George M. Avery
Mother: Seraphina Princess Mary Phelps
Notes: [10744]
Wife: Minnie Evalena Bartholemew
Born: 25 Feb 1856[10304] [10305] at: Elmwood, Illinois
Died: at:
Father: Albetus Bartholemew
Mother: Mary Ennis Payne
Children
Name: Elvira Princess Avery
Born: at: Galesburg, Knox, Illinois, United States
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: George Luzerne Avery [13823]
Born: at: Galesburg, Knox, Illinois, United States
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Spouses: Miriam Hunter

Name: Grace Ophelia Avery [13824]
Born: 8 Oct 1883[13824] at: Galesburg, Knox, Illinois, United States
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Harriette Avery [13825]
Born: 20 Jun 1886[13825] at: Galesburg, Knox, Illinois, United States
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Cyrus M. Avery Jr. [13097]
Born: 29 May 1899[13097] at: Galesburg, Knox, Illinois, United States
Died: at:
Spouses:


Pedigree Chart for: Cyrus Minor Avery

      /--Nathan  Avery 
   /--William Thomas  Avery 
   |  \--Deborah  Thomas 
/--George M.  Avery 
|  |  /--William  Throop 
|  \--Phebe  Throop 
|     \--Prudence  Hyde 
|--Cyrus Minor  Avery 
|     /--Aaron  Phelps  Jr.
|  /--Aaron Noble  Phelps 
|  |  \--Mary  Noble 
\--Seraphina Princess Mary  Phelps 
   |  /--Aaron  Phelps  Jr.
   \--Clarissa  Root 
      \--Princess  Noble 

Pedigree Chart for: Minnie Evalena Bartholemew

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--Albetus  Bartholemew 
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Minnie Evalena  Bartholemew 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Mary Ennis  Payne 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

[10744] Co-founder with brother Robert of Avery & Co. in Peoria. He also owned an interest in Frost Manufacturing Company. The Spiral-knife Stalk-cutter was invented by Robert H. & Cyrus M. Avery.

Rice, James Montgomery. "Peoria City and County, Illinois: A Record of Settlement, Organization, Progress and Achievement" , S.J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1912 Original from the New York Public Library.

In the city of Galesburg, where many years of his life were passed, Cyrus Minor Avery was widely known and his many attractive social qualities and admirable characteristics gained for him the friendship and kindly regard of all with whom he came in contact. He was one of Galesburg's native sons, his birth having here occurred on the 19th of June, 1846, when the city was but a small town and outlying districts of the state were largely undeveloped and unimproved. His parents were George and Saraphena Princess Mary (Phelps) Avery, both natives of the state of New York. The father was born in New Lebanon and was a representative in the seventh generation of a family that traces its ancestry back to Christopher Avery, the line coming down through James, Thomas, Abraham, Nathan and William Thomas to George. As a young man the last named came to the west, arriving in Galesburg in 1837. Here he built the second house in what was then known as Log City. Later the place of his abode, now on West Main street, came to be called the Avery farm. There he followed general agricultural pursuits at a time when the most fore- sighted could not have dreamed that his place would one day be near the very heart of the enterprising city. The lady whom he afterward made his wife came to the west with her brother and mother, settling in Knoxville, where they were married. For many years Mr. Avery continued to engage in general farming but at length retired and took up his abode within the limits of Galesburg, living on North Cherry street. There the fruits of his former toil supplied him with the necessities and comforts of life up to the time of his death, which occurred on the ist of January, 1884. His wife also died at the Cherry street home. They were members of the First Congregational church, in the work of which they took active and helpful part, Mr. Avery serving as deacon for many years. His political indorsement was given to the republican party. In the family were six children: Robert H., who died September 13, 1892; Mary, the wife of W. R. Butcher, living at Roodhouse. Illinois; John T., who died August n, 1905, at Galesburg; Cyrus M. ; Phoebe T., who is now living in Biloxi, 'Mississippi ; and George, also of Biloxi.

Cyrus M. Avery was educated in the public schools of Galesburg and in Knox College, where he completed his course with the class of 1868. He worked with his father on the farm for a time and was early trained to habits of industry and diligence. He afterward engaged in the manufacturing business and made for himself a creditable position in trade circles in his native city. Early in the '705 he joined his brother, Robert Hanneman Avery, in the establishment of a plant for the manufacture of agricultural implements in Galesburg. The brother had been a soldier in the Civil War, was captured and was held as a prisoner at Andersonville, where he spent many otherwise idle hours in drawing in the sand of the prison yard designs of agricultural implements which he began to make soon after his release, the first being a stalk cutter and a corn planter. When the plans of the brothers were perfected for the conduct of an agricultural implement manufactory, they began business under the style of R. H. & C. M. Avery, operating their plant at Galesburg until 1882, when they went to Peoria and made arrangements for removing their factory to the latter city. There the enterprise was developed into a very large corporation known as the Avery Company. In 1883, after the removal of the business to Peoria, the Avery Planter Company was organized with a capital of two hundred thousand dollars. Ten years later the authorized capital was incresed to three hundred thousand dollars, and in 1900 the name was changed to the Avery Manufacturing Company, at which time the capital stock was increased to one million dollars. The business continued to grow and is now capitalized for two million, five hundred thousand dollars. The plant is one of the most extensive and prominent productive industries of Peoria, with business connections that reach out to all parts of the world. C. M. Avery continued active in the management and control of the interests at Peoria until 1902, when he returned to his native city and erected here a large, comfortable and attractive modern residence. The remainder of his life was divided between the two cities of Galesburg and Peoria; although he regarded the former as his home.

It was here on the 4th of October, 1877, that Mr. Avery was united in marriage to Miss Minnie Evalena Bartholomew, who was born at Elmwood, Illinois, February 25, 1856, and is a daughter of Luzerne and Sarah Elvira (Payne) Bartholomew. They became the parents of five children : Elvira Princess, born September 25, 1878; George Luzerne, September 12, 1879; Grace Ophelia, Octoher her 8, 1883; Harriette, June 20, 1886; and Cyrus Minor, May 29, 1899. The first two were born in Galesburg, the last three in Peoria. George Luzerne Avery is still connected with the Avery Company as its secretary. The enterprise is now a business of mammoth proportions and includes the manufacture of agricultural implements, farm wagons, engines, threshers, engine gang plows, gas tractors and city and farm trucks. While the factory and main office are at Peoria, branch houses are maintained at Omaha, Nebraska ; Des Moines, Iowa ; Minneapolis, Minnesota; Fargo, North Dakota; Billings, Montana; Kansas City, Missouri ; Indianapolis, Indiana ; St. Louis, Missouri ; Grand Forks, North Dakota ; Sioux Falls, South Dakota ; and Aberdeen, South Dakota.

The family circle was broken by death, when on the 15th of September, 1905, in Galesburg, Cyrus M. Avery passed away. His life record has been a credit and honor to the city which had ever honored and respected him. His business career was notable by reason of its successful achievement and the extent of the concern which was developed through the enterprise and under the able direction of himself and brother. He seemed to possess a faculty for devising and executing the right thing at the right time and this was joined to every day common sense. He seemed easily to discriminate between the essential and the non-essential, to see the possibility for the coordination of forces and to use each opportunity to the best advantage. Method and system were ever features of the business, together with the employment of skilled and expert workmen. In matters of judgment Mr. Avery was seldom if ever at fault and what he accomplished represented the fit utilization of the innate powers and talents which were his. As prosperity came to him he continually reached out a helping hand to those less fortunate and his benevolence was manifest in generous support of many worthy public projects and charities. Something of his position in the city of his birth is indicated in the fact that at his demise the year book of Knox College for 1907 bore the following inscription:

"To the memory of
Cyrus Minor Avery,
honored alumnus, valued trustee, successful business man, upright and influential citizen ; whose singular nobility of character, loyal friendship and warm-hearted, open-handed generosity, his Alma Mater holds in grateful and loving esteem,
This Book is Dedicated."

This pictured forth the feeling entertained for him not only in Galesburg and in Peoria but wherever he was known and no higher testimonial of his character could be given than the fact that he was most honored where best known.

Perry, Albert. J. (1912) History of Knox County, Illinois. Vol. II. The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, Chicago. pages 30-34

[13823] G.L. Avery occupies a position of leadership as a representative of industrial activity in Peoria, being secretary of the Avery Company, owning and controlling one of the most extensive manufacturing plants in this city. It is true that he entered upon a business already established, but he has contributed to its enlargement and to its successful management and today there is no resident of Peoria who occupies a more honorable or enviable position in trade circles here. He has proven his worth in every connection, has learned the lessons which each day brings and has used the knowledge thus acquired for the furtherance of a business which is a feature in the general prosperity as well as in individual success. Mr. Avery was born in Galesburg, Knox county, Illinois, in 1879, and is descended in the eighth generation from Christopher Avery, the ancestral line being traced down through James, Thomas, Abraham, Nathan, William and George to Cyrus Minor Avery, his father. George Avery was the founder of the family in the west, establishing his home in Galesburg in 1837. There he built the second house in what was then known as Log City, in the midst of a tract that came to be called the Avery farm. He married Saraphena Princess Mary Phelps, who came to the west with her brother and mother, settling in Knoxville, Illinois, where she married Mr. Avery. For many years Mr. Avery continued to engage in general farming but at length retired and took up his abode within the limits of Galesburg, living on North Cherry street. There the fruits of his former toil supplied him with all of the necessities and many of the comforts of life up to the time of his death, which occurred on the first of January, 1884. His wife also died at the Cherry street home.

They were members of the First Congregational church, in the work of which they took active and helpful part, Mr. Avery serving as deacon for many years. His political indorsement was given to the republican party. In the family were six children : Robert H., who died September 13, 1892; Mary, the wife of W. R. Butcher, living at 1912, Illinois; John T., who died August, 1905, at Galesburg; Cyrus M. ; Phoebe T., who is living in Biloxi, Mississippi ; and George, also of Biloxi. The first named and his brother, Cyrus M. Avery, uncle and father of our subject, were the founders of the business now conducted under the name of the Avery Company. Cyrus M. Avery was educated in the public schools of Galesburg and Knox College, and after working with his father on the farm for a time engaged in manufacturing. It was early in the 1875 that he joined his brother, Robert Hanneman Avery, in the establishment of a plant for the manufacture of agricultural implements in Galesburg under the style of R. H. & C. M. Avery. They conducted the business there until 1882, when they removed their factory to Peoria.

The following year the Avery Planter Company was organized with a capital of two hundred thousand dollars. Ten years afterward the authorized capital was increased to three hundred thousand dollars and in 1900 the name was changed to the Avery Manufacturing Company, at which time the capital stock was increased to one million dollars. After the business was incorporated R. H. Avery became its president and so continued until his death, which occurred on the 13th of September, 1892. At that time C. M. Avery, who was vice president, succeeded to the presidency and remained at the head of the business until his death. From the time of the removal of the plant to Peoria he divided his time between that city and Galesburg. In the latter he was married, October 4, 1877, to Miss Minnie Evalena Bartholomew, who was born at Elmwood, Illinois, February 25, 1856, and is a daughter of Luzerne and Sarah Elvira (Payne) Bartholomew. They became the parents of five children: Elvira Princess, born September 25, 1878; George Luzerne; Grace Ophelia, born October 8, 1883; Harriette, June 20, 1886; and Cyrus Minor, May 29, 1899. The mother is still a resident of Galesburg but the father died on the 15th of September, 1905. He occupied a most honored and prominent position in the business circles of the city and his son. G. L. Avery, has followed in his footsteps.

The latter was largely reared in Peoria but was graduated from Knox College at Galesburg in 1902. He has since been connected with the Avery Company and is today occupying an executive position as its secretary. After his graduation in 1902 he became connected with the business, as private secretary to his father, who was then president of the company, and following his father's demise was appointed secretary and also was made one of the directors of the company. His associate officers are : J. B. Bartholomew, president ; H. C. Roberts, vice president ; and Ellwood Cole, treasurer. The first two have been connected with the company for thirty-three consecutive years and the last named for three years, so that the different officers are thoroughly acquainted with their departments of the business.

The plant of the Avery Company covers a total of twenty-seven and five-hundredths acres and the main factory building, together with the various warehouses, have a total floor space of six and a half acres. The various departments of the factory are united by an improved type of trolley system of the company's manufacture which greatly facilitates the rapid handling of both finished and unfinished goods at a minimum of expense. That harmonious and notable relations exist between the company and its employes is indicated by the fact that labor troubles are unknown in their factory. The company manufactures steam and gasoline traction engines, self-lift plows, traction steam shovels, traction hauling wagons, threshing machinery and all its various attachments, mounted steel water tanks, farm wagons, corn planters, riding and walking cultivators, single and double row stalk cutters and gasoline tracts - both farm and city. Their output is sent to all parts of the country and into foreign lands as well. They have branch houses located at Omaha, Des Moines, Kansas City, Minneapolis, St. Louis, Indianapolis, Grand Forks and Fargo, North Dakota, and Aberdeen, South Dakota. They have a large traveling force upon the road and their Canadian trade is handled from Winnipeg. Their foreign shipments go to Mexico, Argentine Republic, Brazil, Russia. Austria-Hungary, the Philippines, Portugal, China, Sweden, Cuba and Egypt. The foreign trade gives an outlet for much machinery at a time when the shipping season for the home trade is lightest. The officials of the company work together in the utmost harmony and their relation is one of close social as well as business interests.

Mr. Avery was united in marriage to Miss Miriam Hunter, of Chillicothe, Illinois, a daughter of E. F. Hunter, and theirs is one of the attractive and hospitable homes of the city. Mr. Avery belongs to the Creve Coeur Club and is recognized aside from other connections already mentioned as a citizen of worth, cooperating heartily and generously in support of many projects which have constituted valuable features in the city's growth and improvement. He is a broad and liberal-minded man of progressive spirit, keeping in touch with the tendency of the times and always holding to the high standards which have made the name of Avery the synonym not only for enterprise but for incorruptible integrity in business circles.

-- Rice, James Montgomery, "Peoria City and County, Illinois: A Record of Settlement, Organization, Progress and Achievement." S.J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1912. p. 182.

@1 [14656] [S451]

@1 [10742] [S552]

  • @2Page: p. 182

@1 [10743] [S569]

@1 [10304] [S82]

  • @2Page: p. 840
  • @4Data:
    • Date: 13 Jul 2002

@1 [10305] [S552]

  • @2Page: p. 182

@1 [13824] [S552]

  • @2Page: p. 182

@1 [13825] [S552]

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@1 [13097] [S552]

  • @2Page: p. 182

Lyle James Kinne / Marie Henneritta Opel

Husband: Lyle James Kinne
Born: 8 Nov 1914at:
Married: 10 Nov 1941at:
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Wife: Marie Henneritta Opel
Born: 31 May 1920at:
Died: at:
Father: William Henry Opel
Mother: Lavina Elnore Burgess
Children
Name: Roger William Kinne [9396]
Born: at:
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Susan Jane Kinne [9397]
Born: at:
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Denis James Kinne [9398]
Born: at:
Died: at:
Spouses:


Pedigree Chart for: Lyle James Kinne

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Lyle James  Kinne 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Marie Henneritta Opel

      /--Jacob  Opel 
   /--Johann Andrew  Opel 
   |  \--Johanette  Krug 
/--William Henry  Opel 
|  |  /--Johann Jacob  Klein 
|  \--Marie Henrietta  Klein 
|     \--Katharine Wilhelmine  Seel 
|--Marie Henneritta  Opel 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Lavina Elnore  Burgess 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

[9396] This person is presumed living.

[9397] This person is presumed living.

[9398] This person is presumed living.

Otto Ludwig Peter Kibbel / Lillie Nora Terlinden

Husband: Otto Ludwig Peter Kibbel
Born: 23 Jun 1884at: Wayne, Washington, Wisconsin, United States
Married: 10 Jul 1906at: Wayne, Washington, WIsconsin
Died: 13 Nov 1966at: Lemmon, South Dakota
Father:
Mother:
Notes: [11467]
Wife: Lillie Nora Terlinden
Born: 1 Mar 1887at: Wayne, Washington, Wisconsin, United States
Died: 3 Apr 1944at: Bismarck, North Dakota
Father: Peter Terlinden
Mother: Bertha Anna Erdman
Notes: [11457]
Children

Pedigree Chart for: Otto Ludwig Peter Kibbel

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Otto Ludwig Peter  Kibbel 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Lillie Nora Terlinden

      /--Peter  Terlinden 
   /--Johann Philip  Terlinden  Sr.
   |  \--Catharina  Otten 
/--Peter  Terlinden 
|  |  /--John Philipp  Scheid  II
|  \--Catharina  Scheid 
|     \--Maria Catharina  Weisskopf 
|--Lillie Nora  Terlinden 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Bertha Anna  Erdman 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

[11467] Otto and LIllie moved to North Dakota in 1906. Otto homesteaded inHettinger County, ND. Otto, 4 of his cousins and his brother went out tohomestead but his brother didn't stay and sold his homestead back to Otto.

Otto's parents had moved to Milwaukee and their son, George (Otto'sbrother) took over the farm. In the city Otto delivered papers andworked in a bakery. AS Otto grew older he started to run with a wilderbunch of kids so his parents sent him back to the farm to live withGeorge and his family. Otto was always close to his brother, George andtheir kids.

[11457] All of Lillie's spouses have to be verified yet except for Otto Kibbel.According to the obituary of one of her parents, she is listed as Mrs.Otto Kibbel from Bentley, North Dakota.

Lillie and her two older children visited the Termlinden's and Kibbelsfor Christmas in 1915. Lillie also went there to a doctor for an ingrowngoiter which the doctor's treated her for and the treatment caused heartdamage. Lillie became a diabetic at the age of 30 and was one of thefirst to receive insulin.

Otto Kibbel was the love of Lillie's life. She was a very beautifulwoman and was proud to have 4 men attached to her name according to hergranddaughter, Loraine Stindt. Lillie also went back for Annie's weddingin 1923. Don't know any other times that Lillie went back home but Ottowent back several other times.

Lillie loved beautiful things--flowers, music, nice hats and clothes.She would rather dance than eat. She also had a nice singing voice. Shewas a good cook also and rarely used a recipe, it was always a little bitof this and a little bit of that. She did not have much formal schoolingbut could read and write. She always read the paper and rarely wroteletters which she left up to Otto. She was always the peacemaker and waseasy going like her father, Peter. Otto was the neighbor boy and was theonly guy she was every really interested in. Lillie worked as a maid forrich families in Milwaukee and loved telling her grandchildren storiesabout her life in Milwaukee.

Then she married someone who didn't dance and who liked politics andfinance. His name was Otto. He liked some of the finer things in lifealso but pretned he didn't really care about poetry and music but when hedied they found his collection. Both Otto and Lillie lived to tell oftheir life and family in Wisconsin and kept in contact with them althoughgoing back and forth to visit wasn't easy in those days.

 


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