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On 20 March 1630 the ship Mary & John sailed from Plymouth, England, with 140 passengers. The families were all recruited by the Rev. John White of Dorchester, Dorset. Nearly all of these families came from the West Country of England, i.e. counties of Somerset, Dorset and Devon. The ship landed in New England, on 30 May 1630, two weeks before the Winthrop Fleet arrived. These people founded one of the first towns in Massachusetts, Dorchester, 1630, and one of the earliest in Connecticut, Windsor, five years later.

About the Ship Mary and John

It Carried Phelps' from England to the Colonies

On 20 March 1630, as part of what was later described as the Great Migration, the ship Mary & John sailed from Plymouth, England, with 140 passengers. The families were all recruited by the Rev. John White of Dorchester, Dorset. Nearly all of these families came from the West Country of England, i.e. counties of Somerset, Dorset and Devon. The ship landed in New England, on 30 May 1630, two weeks before the Winthrop Fleet arrived. These people founded one of the first towns in Massachusetts, Dorchester, 1630, and one of the earliest in Connecticut, Windsor, five years later.

The Mary and John left England in March of 1630 and arrived seventy days later, on May 30, 1630, at the mouth of what is now Boston harbor. The ship's captain refused to sail up the Charles river as planned, because he feared running the ship aground in waters that he had no charts for. He instead left the passengers in a desolate locale miles from their intended destination. The settlors were forced to transport 150,000 pounds of livestock, provisions and equipment 20 miles overland to their final destination.

No actual list of passengers for the 1630 voyage of the Mary and John has ever been found. Several synthetic lists have since been compiled, particularly two by Charles E. Banks (1930) and Maude Pinney Kuhns (1943). Additional research by the Mary and John Clearing House throws additional doubt on these lists. They estimate no list is more than 50 to 70 percent accurate. For complete information, see the Mary and John Passenger List.

The Mary and John returned to Connecticut in 1634 bringing additional colonists on a second voyage.