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William Wines Phelps / Sarah Betsy Gleason

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William Wines Phelps / Sarah Betsy Gleason

Husband: William Wines Phelps
Born: 17 Feb 1792[1476] at: Hanover, Morris, New Jersey, USA
Married: at:  
Died: 7 Mar 1872at: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
Father: Enon Phelps
Mother: Mehitable Goldsmith
Notes: [1477]
Sources: [1476] [1478]
Wife: Sarah Betsy Gleason
Born: at:
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Children

Pedigree Chart for: William Wines Phelps

      /--Noah  Phelps 
   /--Elijah  Phelps 
   |  \--Marie Anna  Dyer 
/--Enon  Phelps 
|  |  /--John  Wilcox 
|  \--Jemima  Wilcox 
|     \--Mary  Warner 
|--William Wines  Phelps 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Mehitable  Goldsmith 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Sarah Betsy Gleason

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Sarah Betsy  Gleason 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

[1477]

William W. Phelps (1792-1872) was born at Hanover, New Jersey. Well educated, Phelps was an aspirant for the office of lieutenant governor of New York at the time he first learned of Mormonism through reading the Book of Mormon and talking with Sidney Rigdon. He visited Kirtland in 1831, was baptized, and became active in editorial work, establishing the "Evening and Morning Star". One of the Prophet's scribes, he assisted in preparing the first hymnal. Excommunicated in 1839, he returned to fellowship in 1841 and fulfilled a mission to the eastern states. He was implicated in the difficulty surrounding the destruction of the Nauvoo Expositor and was summoned to be tried for treason with Joseph Smith at Carthage. He accompanied the pioneers to Utah, where he became one of the first regents of the University of Deseret and a representative in the Utah legislature. LDS Church Hymns by William W. Phelps include the following: "Gently Raise the Sacred Strain" "Now Let Us Rejoice" "Hosanna Anthem" ("The Spirit of God") "Praise to the Man" "Vade Mecum" From "The Phelps Family of America and Their English Ancestors," by Judge Oliver Seymour Phelps & Andrew T. Servin. (Eagle Publishing Company, Pittsfield, Mass., 1899). JUDGE WILLIAM W. PHELPS, b. Dover, N. J., 7 Feb., 1792, removed with his father and family to Homer, N. Y., in 1800, m. Stella Waterman (now called Sally.) Mr. Phelps had a common school education. When quite young he removed to Ohio, soon returning to Homer, N. Y., where he started a paper called the "Western Courier. " From there he removed to Trurnansburgh, Tompkins Co. N. Y., and started the publication of a paper called the "Lake Light." From there he removed to Canandaigua, Ontario Co., N. Y., where he published a paper in the interest of the Anti-Masons, called the Ontario Phoenix. While he resided there the "Book of Mormon" came before the world. He was infatuated with their new religion, abandoned his paper and removing his family to Ohio, joined the Mormon church, and went to Missouri with the first Mormon missionaries. In the fall he returned for his family, purchased a printing press in Cincinnati, and removed with his family to Independence, Jackson Co., Missouri., then a new Mormon settlement. In the fall of 1833 the Mormons were banished from Jackson Co., removing and settling in Colville Co., Mo. From here they were soon routed and removed to [Nauvoo,] Hancock Co., Ill., where they flourished for some time and built a Temple. In 1843 they were again banished. Their next location was Salt Lake City, after which their history is generally known. Mr. Phelps removed and settled with them in Salt Lake City, where he was quite a prominent man, holding for many years the position of Judge. He died there 6 March, 1872 in his 78th year, leaving a widow, his first wife, Sally Waterman, and several children, His widow, Sally, says there are three children in Salt Lake City, the rest in the states; as to the number of wives he took and as to his children we have no full records. The following is a copy of a letter to Mr. O. S. Phelps from Mrs. Phelps on the death of her husband. This shows how deeply the people are infatuated by their religion: Salt Lake City, 18 Mar., 1872 Dear Friend: I received your kind letter and was glad to hear from you. I have to inform you that Mr. Phelps died the sixth day of March, and will have a part in the first resurrection of Saints and Apostles. Through all his fightings and doing he has died at a good old age. Peace to his memory. His works will follow him. He is with Joseph and Hiram, the Blessed Martyrs, who died for the Testimony of Jesus, who believed in Revelation and Resurrection literally fulfilled. God is our Judge and our (here there are three or four words obliterated) are free Jesus and his Apostles were thought not fit to live on the Earth, and were slain for their religion, but we fear not what man can do unto us knowing that God is on our side. Should like you to come to Salt Lake City and see and hear for yourself. Should like to hear from you often. Accept my best wishes and may Peace attend you and yours, I remain your friend and well-wisher. Sally Phelps Early in life he was a candidate for the office of lieutenant-governor of New York. He was baptized into the Church in June, 1831, and undertook a mission to Jackson County, Missouri, where he located as a printer, and published a monthly paper, "The Evening and Morning Star," the first number of which appeared in June, 1832. While he was attending to his duties at the printing office, on July 20, a mob attacked his house, which contained the printing equipment, and pulled it partly down, seized the printing materials, destroyed many papers, and threw his family and furniture out of doors. Again on July 23, the mob renewed their depredations, and William W. Phelps and others offered themselves as a ransom for the Saints, being willing to be scourged, or to die, if that would appease the anger of the mob. The mob would not accept this sacrifice, however, but continued to utter threats of violence against the whole Church. This persecution culminated in the Saints being driven from their homes in Jackson County, in November, 1833. Mob leaders warned Brother Phelps and others to flee for their lives, or they would be killed. Despite repeated appeals, which Elder Phelps helped to frame, to the governor of Missouri, and to the president of the United States, no protection or redress was ever given them. When the exiled Saints in Clay County were organized into a stake, David Whitmer was chosen president, with William W. Phelps and John Whitmer as counselors. He took a prominent part in all matters pertaining to the welfare of the Saints in Missouri. In the early part of 1835, he and his son Waterman were called to Kirtland, where they made their home with the family of the Prophet Joseph Smith and assisted a committee appointed to compile the "Book of Doctrine and Covenants." About this time, Elder Phelps subscribed $500 toward the erection of the Kirtland Temple. When the Church purchased the Egyptian mummies and papyrus from Michael H. Chandler in 1835, William W. Phelps served as one of the scribes in the translation by Joseph Smith of the "Book of Abraham." o 1823- publisher of Lake Light in Trumansburg, NY by 1828 moved to Canandaigua, NY publishing the anti-Masonic Ontario Phoenix June 6, 1831 o elder Oct 1, 1831 o high priest 1833 o printed the Book of Commandments 1835 o assisted in compiling and printing 1st editioin of the Doctrine & Covenants March 17, 1838 o excommunicated July 22, 1840 o extended hand of fellowship 1846 o left Nauvoo for the west o edited Evening & Morning Star 1832-1833 o authored "Redeemer of Israel" "Come All Ye Sons of Zion" "Earth with Her Ten Thousand Flowers" "O Jesus! the Giver" "The Spirit of God Like a Fire is Burning" "Glorious Things are Sung of Zion" "O God the Eternal Father" See D&C 55, 57:5a, 58:9, 61:2 Scribe during tranlation of Book of Abraham LBE says 2/6/38 rejected by Saints LBE says 3/17/39 excommunicated LBE says early 1841 extended hand of fellowship

@1 [1476] [S80]

  • @2Page: p 650-51
  • @4Data:
    • Date: 25 Mar 2000

@1 [1478] [S44]

David I King of Scotland / Matilda (Maud) Huntington

Husband: David I King of Scotland
Born: ABT 1080at: Scotland
Married: 1113at: Scotland
Died: 24 May 1153at: Carlisle, Cumberland, England
Father: Malcolm III King of Scotland
Mother: Margaret 'Etheling' Queen of Scotland
Sources: [2904]
Wife: Matilda (Maud) Huntington
Born: ABT 1072at: Huntington, Huntingdonshire, England
Died: 23 Apr 1130at: Scotland
Father: Waltheof Earl of Northumberland
Mother: Judith of Boulogne
Sources: [2905]
Children
Name: Henry Earl of Huntington [2818] [2819]
Born: ABT 1114at: Scotland
Married: at:  
Died: 12 Jun 1152at: Scotland
Spouses: Ada de Warenne

Name: Hodierna of Scotland [2906]
Born: ABT 1117at: Scotland
Died: ABT 1140at: Scotland
Spouses:

Name: Malcolm [2907]
Born: ABT 1113at: Scotland
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Clarice [2908]
Born: ABT 1115at: Scotland
Died: ABT 1135at:
Spouses:

Name: Scotland [2909]
Born: ABT 1108at: Scotland
Died: at:
Spouses:


Pedigree Chart for: David I King of Scotland

      /--Crinan  Dunkeld  Earl of Huntingdon
   /--Duncan   I King of Scots
   |  \--Bethoc   
/--Malcolm   III King of Scotland
|  |  /--
|  \--Elfaed   
|     \--
|--David   I King of Scotland
|     /--Edmund II Ironside   
|  /--Edward the Exile  Ethling 
|  |  \--Ealdgyth   
\--Margaret 'Etheling'   Queen of Scotland
   |  /--Edmund II Ironside   
   \--Agatha   
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Matilda (Maud) Huntington

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--Waltheof Earl of  Northumberland 
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Matilda (Maud)  Huntington 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Judith of  Boulogne 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

@1 [2904] [S44]

@1 [2905] [S44]

@1 [2818] [S252]

@1 [2819] [S44]

@1 [2906] [S44]

@1 [2907] [S44]

@1 [2908] [S44]

@1 [2909] [S44]

Harry Cole / Margaret Jacobs

Husband: Harry Cole
Born: at:
Married: at: Marion, Marion, Ohio, United States
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Wife: Margaret Jacobs
Born: at: Marion, Marion, Ohio, United States
Died: at:
Father: John William Jacobs
Mother: Lucinda Josephine Phelps
Sources: [3923]
Children
Name: Franklin Cole
Born: at: Marion, Marion, Ohio, United States
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Ruth Ann Cole
Born: at: Marion, Marion, Ohio, United States
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: James Cole
Born: at: Marion, Marion, Ohio, United States
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Isabelle Cole
Born: at: Marion, Marion, Ohio, United States
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Harry Cole
Born: at: Marion, Marion, Ohio, United States
Died: at:
Spouses:


Pedigree Chart for: Harry Cole

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Harry  Cole 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Margaret Jacobs

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--John William  Jacobs 
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Margaret  Jacobs 
|     /--Daniel S.  Phelps 
|  /--Horace Jesse  Phelps 
|  |  \--Nancy  Judy 
\--Lucinda Josephine  Phelps 
   |  /--Daniel S.  Phelps 
   \--Marguerite Samantha  Hess 
      \--

@1 [3923] [S192]

  • @4Data:
    Date of Import: 7 Jun 1999

Robert H. Wilds / Dara Ryan

Husband: Robert H. Wilds
Born: at: 
Died:at: 
Father:  at: 
Mother:  at: 
Wife: Dara Ryan
Born: [4835] at:
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Sources: [4835] [4836]
Children
Name: Anna Ryan Wilds [4834]
Born: at:
Died: at:
Spouses:


Pedigree Chart for: Robert H. Wilds

      /--
   /--Robert Henry  Wilds  Sr.
   |  \--
/--Sheffield Phelps  Wilds 
|  |  /--Sheffield  Phelps 
|  \--Eleanor Sheffield  Phelps 
|     \--Claudia Wright  Lea 
|--Robert H.  Wilds 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Lorinda Anna  Lent 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Dara Ryan

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Dara  Ryan 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

[4817]

This person is presumed living.

[4834]

This person is presumed living.

@1 [4835] [S371]

  • @4Data:
    Date of Import: Jul 6, 2000

@1 [4836] [S371]

  • @4Data:
    Date of Import: Jul 6, 2000

Cyril Call / Sally (or Sarah) Tiffany

Husband: Cyril Call
Born: 29 Jun 1785at: Woodstock, Windsor, Vermont, United States
Married: 6 Apr 1806at: Cambridge, Franklin, Vermont, Vermont
Died: 23 May 1873at: Bountiful, Davis, Utah, United States
Father: Joseph Call
Mother: Mary Sanderson
Notes: [10471]
Sources: [10472]
Wife: Sally (or Sarah) Tiffany
Born: 27 Nov 1790at: Fletcher, Franklin, Vermont
Died: 15 Mar 1856at: Bountiful, Davis, Utah, United States
Father: Christopher Tiffany
Mother: Rebecca Ellis
Sources: [10473]
Children
Name: Harvey Call [10480]
Born: 6 Sep 1808at: Fletcher, Franklin, Vermont
Married: at:  
Died: 18 May 1849at: Fort Leavenworth, Leavenworth, Kansas, United States
Spouses: Mary Ann (Logan) Lougy

Name: Anson Call [10580] [10581]
Born: 13 May 1810at: Fletcher, Franklin, Vermont
Married: at:  
Died: 31 Aug 1890at: Bountiful, Davis, Utah, United States
Spouses: Ann Clark , Mary Flint , Margaretta Unwin Clark , Emma Summers , Henrietta Caroline Williams

Name: Salmon Solomon Call [10476]
Born: 27 Jul 1812at: Fletcher, Franklin, Vermont
Died: 1813at: Fletcher, Franklin, Vermont
Spouses:

Name: Samantha Call [10481]
Born: 15 Nov 1814at: Fairfax, Franklin, Vermont
Married: at:  
Died: 13 Nov 1905at: Bountiful, Davis, Utah, United States
Spouses: Jeremiah Willey

Name: Fannie Amy Call [12131]
Born: 11 May 1815at: Fairfax,Franklin,Vermont, USA
Married: at:  
Died: 20 Nov 1898at: Bountiful, Davis, Utah, United States
Spouses: Chester Loveland

Name: Lucina Call [10475]
Born: 29 Sep 1819at: Mentor, Geauga, Ohio
Married: at:  
Died: 29 Jun 1904at: Bountiful, Davis, Utah, United States
Spouses: Perrigrine Sessions

Name: Josiah Howe Call [10431] [10432]
Born: 15 Aug 1821at: Madison, Geauga, Ohio, United States
Married: at:  
Died: 7 Oct 1858at: Chicken Creek, Near Fillmore, Millard, Utah, USA
Spouses: Henrietta Caroline Williams , Christense Nielsen

Name: Mary Call [10474]
Born: 21 Feb 1824at: Madison, Geauga, Ohio, United States
Married: at:  
Died: 25 Nov 1865at: Bountiful, Davis, Utah, United States
Spouses: Perrigrine Sessions

Name: Sonora 'Rosaline' Call [5704]
Born: 29 Dec 1826at: Madison, Lake Co., Oh
Died: 5 Mar 1906at: Farmington, Davis, Utah, USA
Spouses:

Name: Sarah Call [10482] [10483]
Born: 19 Dec 1828at: Madison, Geauga, Ohio, United States
Married: at:  
Died: 4 Sep 1886at: Bountiful, Davis, Utah, United States
Spouses: Nathaniel Calonder Hanchett

Name: Malissa Call
Born: 29 Mar 1830at: Madison,Geauge,Ohio
Married: at:  
Died: 31 Aug 1888at:
Spouses: Russell Gideon Brownell

Name: Omer Call [10478] [10479]
Born: 9 Jan 1834at: Madison, Geauga, Ohio, United States
Married: at:  
Died: 14 Sep 1909at: Willard, Box Elder, Utah, United States
Spouses: Sarah Maria Ferrin

Name: Homer Call [10484]
Born: 9 Jan 1834at: Madison,Geauge,Ohio
Married: at:  
Died: 11 Jul 1908at: Willard, Box Elder, Utah, United States
Spouses: Nancy Merrill

Name: Sanora Rosaline Call
Born: 29 Dec 1826at: Madison,Geauge,Ohio
Married: at:  
Died: 5 Mar 1906at: Farmington, Davis, Utah, United States
Spouses: Fortunastus (Fernatus) Dustin


Pedigree Chart for: Cyril Call

      /--
   /--Samuel  Call 
   |  \--
/--Joseph  Call 
|  |  /--
|  \--Abigail  Sprague 
|     \--
|--Cyril  Call 
|     /--
|  /--Benjamin  Sanderson 
|  |  \--
\--Mary  Sanderson 
   |  /--
   \--Elizabeth  Green 
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Sally (or Sarah) Tiffany

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--Christopher  Tiffany 
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Sally (or Sarah)  Tiffany 
|     /--
|  /--Samuel  Ellis 
|  |  \--
\--Rebecca  Ellis 
   |  /--
   \--Zilpha  Hammond 
      \--

[10471]

Source for this family is Bertha Call, 1073 No. 200 West, Bountiful, Utah. Her sources are: Family Record of David and Eliza Call, Bountiful, Utah Pioneer of Utah pg 790. Vermont Vital Records, Montpelier, Vermont. Nauvoo Temple Sealings p 217. Records of Joseph C. Call, Bancroft, Idaho.

[10580]

Excerpted from "Autobiography of Anson Call": I resolved to prepare myself for the conflict by investigating the two books. I accordingly furnished myself with the Book of Mormon. I then commenced the Book of Mormon and the Bible, compared the two and read my Bible from Genesis right through, praying and searching diligently for six months. When I finished the two books I became a firm believer in the Book of Mormon. I was then taught by the spirit to obey the principles of the gospel. My feelings were not known by any but my wife. I was proud and haughty and to obey the gospel was worse than death. I labored under those feelings for three months, becoming at times almost insane. To be called a Mormon, I thought, was more than I could endure. I lamented that my lot was cast in this dispensation. My dreams and my meditations made me miserable. I at last covenanted before the Lord that if he would give me confidence to face the world in Mormonism, I would be baptized for the remission of my sins; before I arose from my knees the horrors of my mind were cleared; I feared no man, no set of men. The next day I went to the Methodist meeting and declared unto them the truth of Mormonism. I told them I should obey it as soon as I could get to Kirtland. I accordingly went immediately there and was baptized by William Smith, Joseph's brother. My wife accompanied me. I was confirmed in the Kirtland Temple by David Whitmer. I immediately returned to Madison and was then prepared to tell my Methodist brethren many things they were strangers to. I improved every opportunity in their meetings, class meetings not excepted. There were my brothers, my mother and my schoolmates. I was much desirous that they should obey the gospel with me. Anson Call, Lesson On Obedience (Compiled and written by David Kenison, Orem, Utah, dkenison@xmission.com) In the winter of 1838-1839, Anson Call and his family had been driven from their home in Far West, Missouri by the enemies of the Church. The Saints were preparing to move to Illinois, and Anson intended to go with them. However, he owned property at a place called "the Three Forks of Grand River," about 30 miles from Far West, and hoped to sell it in order to better provide for himself and his family during their upcoming journey. Anson asked "Father Joseph Smith," father of the Prophet, and Brigham Young for counsel in the matter. They both advised him not to go to Grand River. But Anson decided to make the effort anyway - "I did not want to be burdensome to others." The following account from his journal tells the result of that effort: ===== December 31, 1838, being anxious to obtain means to make a team, that I might be able to go with the Saints, I this morning mounted the only horse I had left, and started for the Three Forks of Grand River. I arrived at my farm on new year's day, and learned that a man by the name of George Washington O'Niel had it in his possession. I passed on two miles further to a family by the name of Day, who had come in from the Eastern States a few weeks before I was driven away. This family had taken no part with the mob. I found the lady at home, and received from her a history of my property. She informed me that O'Niel and Culp, Missouri mobbers, had said that if ever I came to the place they would kill me; and that one Henderson and others would help them. When on my farm I had sold store goods to a number of the citizens, who were to pay me for them at Christmas. She said she had heard many of them say that if I came there, they would pay me just as "Mormons" should be paid. Just at this time O'Niel and Culp came into the house. They demanded of me my reasons for being there. I told them that I was attending to my business. They said I had no business there, and if I got away from there I would be smart. I replied that I was a white man, that it was time enough to be afraid when I saw danger, and that I should go when I pleased. They told me that they would as soon kill me as a dog, and that there would be no more notice taken of my death than if a dog were killed. This I very well understood. They then told me that they supposed I had come to get my property. I informed them I had; to which they replied that there was no property for me. After repeated threatenings I became convinced that it was in vain to think of obtaining anything, and started for my horse, which was hitched at the yard fence about five rods from the door. They followed me. O'Niel picked up the end of a hoop pole which Mr. Day had left there, he having been hooping a barrel. With this pole he struck me a blow upon the head, which nearly brought me to the ground. I looked around for a club with which to defend myself, but there was none in sight. He continued striking me, and would doubtless have killed me, had it not been for a very thick woolen cap on my head. Mrs. Day threw open the door and cried murder. I ran for the house to get something, if possible, to defend myself with; but before I reached the door, he struck me repeatedly, and gave me one blow over the eye, the scar of which I carry to this day. As soon as I got into the house I clutched the fire shovel. At that moment Mrs. Day closed the door, so that I could not get out nor O'Niel in. He and Culp then passed the window, on which Mrs. Day supposed they had started for their guns, so I mounted my horse and rode for Far West as fast as I could. My head and face soon commenced swelling. On my way home I washed myself, and resolved not to inform any one what had happened, as Father Smith and President Young had both told me not to go. I reached home about eleven o'clock at night, and went to bed without making a light. In the morning I arose, and just as soon as I got out of bed, I fell upon the floor. My wife was alarmed and screamed. I told her what had happened; but told her to keep the matter from my family. Father Smith, however, soon heard of the occurrence, and came to see me. He hoped, he said, that the lesson would do me good, and that he was glad that I was not quite killed. Had I obeyed the words "do not go, but stay at home," I should not have fallen into this trouble. May you who read this be wise, and in this particular, profit by my experience. (See "Disobedience to Counsel" by Anson Call, in _Fragments of Experience, Sixth Book of the Faith-Promoting Series_, pp. 20-22) Anson Call, Missouri Persecutions, Settling in Utah (Compiled and written by David Kenison, Orem, Utah, dkenison@xmission.com) Anson Call and his family settled in Missouri in 1838, in spite of threats from the local residents that the Mormons would soon be driven out. It was not long before the Saints were forced to evacuate Far West, many of them moving to an area near Adam-ondi-Ahman. Anson and his family made their escape, leaving most of their possessions behind. The Missouri mobbers followed them, and continued to make threats and accusations. One "guard" confronted Anson in front of his family, called him a liar and put his gun to Anson's face and cocked it; the family screamed in horror, but the man uncocked the gun and rode off. The next night, six inches of snow fell - "My children nearly froze to death. One of them froze his fingers so that he lost a part of his nails." The cold did drive the mob away, but the persecution continued: "They killed our cattle, stole our horses, burned our houses, constantly killing and abusing all that they met with, insulted our women and murdered some of our children." In December 1838, Anson made his way to Ray County to attempt to sell some of the corn he had left in the fields. He was taken captive by some of the mobbers, and ordered to disarm himself - when he proclaimed he carried no weapons, they forced him to empty his pockets and searched his clothing. It was December 24. Anson recorded: "One of them by the name of James Ogle said that he had suffered by the Mormons and that I had to atone for it. He said they had felt my back and they would see it bare before morning and I would feel hickory upon it. He then commenced beating me with the flat hand in the face. He then said he would not abuse a man that was not armed. He threw his butcher knife at my feet and told me to pick it up and fight. I told him I did not wish to fight. He said I had to fight or die. He then picked up the knife and put it to my hand and told me to take it. I discovered all the rest of them had their knives in their hands. I refused to take it and leaned up against the side of the house. I then said in my heart, 'Oh Lord, preserve me or they will take my life.' I immediately became satisfied that I would be delivered from their hands. He thrust a knife within an inch of my breast and said he would rip my guts out. He then struck me repeatedly between my eyes with the back of his knife. He tantalized me in this manner for over two hours and struck me in the face with the back of the knife and his flat hand about 50 times. He said it was getting near night and we must make a finish of the business." Anson was taken into the street and told he would be stripped and tied to a hickory tree, beaten, and left exposed to the cold night. As they were making preparations, Anson managed to get a bottle of liquor from a nearby grocer and then offered drinks to his captors; as they became quickly distracted by the bottle, Anson bolted for some brush nearby. Though he was pursued by the angry mob, he was able to escape and managed to get back to his family on Christmas Day. (From _Anson Call Autobiography, BYU-S) Anson Call and his family survived the Missouri persecutions, and eventually moved west with the Saints. They played an important role in the colonizing of Utah. On July 14, 1843, in Montrose, Iowa, Joseph Smith prophesied that Anson Call "would come to the Rocky mountains, and that he would assist in building cities from one end of the country to the other." The Calls settled first in Bountiful, north of Salt Lake, where he served as bishop from 1849-50. In 1851 he was appointed to serve as probate judge in Millard County (150 miles south of Salt Lake, in central Utah) and later represented that area in the state legislature. In 1854 he founded Call's Fort in Box Elder county, northwest Utah. He also settled in Parowan, Fillmore, and other areas in south-central Utah, and other parts of the state before returning to Bountiful to serve again as bishop from 1873-77. When the Davis Stake was organized there in June 1877, he became a counselor in the presidency. (See _Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah_, p. 791) Anson Call died on August 31, 1890.

[10431]

Sources: This record obtained from LDS Church records archives; Temple Index Bureau 1962 Ut F 16 p 10. Fillmore Cemetery; EH sealing p 500 F Ut. SIC EH Sealings F Ut. SIB; 1851 Census of Utah; Ut. F I Fillmore Church Records. Josiah had another wife, Christense Nielsen, md.14 Jan 1856. After Josiah's death she married Jens Peter Simson.

[10482]

Sarah reportedly married to Samuel Meacham, also.

[10478]

Omer also may have married Elenor Jones, 30 Mar 1867, SLC, Utah; Ehouse.

@1 [10472] [S44]

@1 [10473] [S44]

@1 [10480] [S44]

@1 [10581] [S44]

@1 [10476] [S44]

@1 [10481] [S44]

@1 [12131] [S44]

@1 [10475] [S44]

@1 [10432] [S44]

@1 [10474] [S44]

@1 [5704] [S44]

@1 [10483] [S44]

@1 [10479] [S44]

@1 [10484] [S44]

Earl H. Claggett / Pearl E. Toothman

Husband: Earl H. Claggett
Born: 31 Jan 1887at:
Married: 13 Sep 1906at:
Died: at:
Father: Edmund R. Claggett
Mother: Ida Pound
Wife: Pearl E. Toothman
Born: at:
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Children

Pedigree Chart for: Earl H. Claggett

      /--William G.  Claggett 
   /--William E.  Claggett 
   |  \--Jane  Rector 
/--Edmund R.  Claggett 
|  |  /--
|  \--Cynthia  Hillier 
|     \--
|--Earl H.  Claggett 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Ida  Pound 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Pearl E. Toothman

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Pearl E.  Toothman 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

John Horney / (--?--)

Husband: John Horney
Born: 1790at:
Married: 8 Jan 1819at:
Died: 25 Apr 1854at:
Father: William Horney Sr.
Mother: Hannah Harriet Chipman
Wife: (--?--)
Children

Pedigree Chart for: John Horney

      /--Jeffrey Horney 
   /--Jeffrey Horney  III
   |  \--Elizabeth Harwood 
/--William Horney  Sr.
|  |  /--
|  \--Deborah Baynard 
|     \--
|--John Horney 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Hannah Harriet Chipman 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

(--?--) / (--?--)

Husband: (--?--)
Wife: (--?--)
Children
Name: Rebecca Malinda Stevens
Born: 3 Apr 1858at: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
Married: at:  
Died: 20 Sep 1902at: Garden City, Rich, Utah, United States
Spouses: Hyrum Nephi Dustin

Name: Julia Ann Stevens
Born: 21 Jun 1863at: Willard,Box Elder,Utah, USA
Married: at:  
Died: 20 Nov 1893at: Bryce,Graham,Arizona, USA
Spouses: William Henry Dustin , Charles Edmond Nelson


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