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Robert McNamee / Nannie Dickenson

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Robert McNamee / Nannie Dickenson

[14330]
Husband: Robert McNamee
Born: [1188] at:
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Father: James McNamee
Mother: Elizabeth Stevens Diuguid
Wife: Nannie Dickenson
Born: at:
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Children

Pedigree Chart for: Robert McNamee

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--James  McNamee 
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Robert  McNamee 
|     /--George  Diuguid 
|  /--William Sampson  Diuguid 
|  |  \--Nancy  Sampson 
\--Elizabeth Stevens  Diuguid 
   |  /--George  Diuguid 
   \--Susannah  Thornhill 
      \--Elizabeth (Stevens)  Stephens 

Pedigree Chart for: Nannie Dickenson

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Nannie  Dickenson 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

[14330]

No children.

@1 [1188] [S89]

  • @2Page: p. 202

Roger Phelps / Abigail Filler

Husband: Roger Phelps
Born: 24 Dec 1738at: Hebron, Tolland, Connecticut, United States
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Father: John Phelps
Mother: Anna Hosford
Sources: [5046]
Wife: Abigail Filler
Born: at:
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Children

Pedigree Chart for: Roger Phelps

      /--Timothy  Phelps 
   /--Joseph  Phelps 
   |  \--Mary  Griswold 
/--John  Phelps 
|  |  /--John  Hosford 
|  \--Sarah  Hosford 
|     \--Phillipi  Thrall 
|--Roger  Phelps 
|     /--John  Hosford 
|  /--Obadiah  Hosford 
|  |  \--Phillipi  Thrall 
\--Anna  Hosford 
   |  /--John  Hosford 
   \--Mindwell  Phelps 
      \--Mary  Porter 

Pedigree Chart for: Abigail Filler

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Abigail  Filler 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

@1 [5046] [S80]

David Connor / Roseanna-Eliza Forand

Husband: David Connor
Born: at:
Married: 29 Apr 1904at: Canaan, Grafton Co., New Hampshire, USA
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Wife: Roseanna-Eliza Forand
Born: Mar 1889at: Barton, Orleans Co., Vermont
Died: at:
Father: Nazaire Forand
Mother: Marie Jessé Grondin
Children

Pedigree Chart for: David Connor

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--David  Connor 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Roseanna-Eliza Forand

      /--
   /--Nazaire  Forand 
   |  \--
/--Nazaire  Forand 
|  |  /--Oliver Cromwell  Phelps 
|  \--Marie-Philomène-Roxanne  Phoebe 
|     \--Marie-Josephte  Roi 
|--Roseanna-Eliza  Forand 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Marie Jessé  Grondin 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Selbert Young / Mary Phelps Jacob

Husband: Selbert Young
Born: at:
Married: 1933at:
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Wife: Mary Phelps Jacob
Born: 20 Apr 1892at: New Rochelle, New York, USA
Died: 24 Jan 1970[5412] at: Rome, Italy
Father: William Hearns Jacob
Mother: Mary Phelps
Notes: [5413]
Sources: [5412] [5414] [5415]
Children

Pedigree Chart for: Selbert Young

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Selbert  Young 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Mary Phelps Jacob

      /--William Hearn  Jacob 
   /--Leonard  Jacobs 
   |  \--Ann  Tucker 
/--William Hearns  Jacob 
|  |  /--John Riker  Lawrence 
|  \--Emma  Lawrence 
|     \--Margarete  Quick 
|--Mary Phelps  Jacob 
|     /--Walter  Phelps 
|  /--Walter  Phelps 
|  |  \--Julia  Beach 
\--Mary  Phelps 
   |  /--Walter  Phelps 
   \--Eliza Ann  Schenk 
      \--Harriet Tilling  Hart 

[5413]

The first modern brassiere to receive a patent and gain wide acceptance was a bra invented by a young New York socialite named Mary Phelps Jacob in 1910. Born on 20 April 1891 in New Rochelle, New York, "Polly" (as she nicknamed herself) was the daughter of a prominent New England family. Her ancestry included Governor Bradford, the Plymouth Colony's first governor, and Robert Fulton, developer of the steamboat. Polly's family was not fabulously rich, but her father had been raised, as she put it, "to ride to hounds, sail boats, and lead cotillions," and he lived high. She grew up, she later said, "in a world where only good smells existed." "What I wanted," she said of her privileged childhood, "usually came to pass." A childhood of privilege included private school, dancing school, and horse riding school. She was a rather disinterested student. One commentator writes that for the most part Polly "lived her life in dreams." (Wolff). In 1915, at age 24, Polly Jacob married Richard Rogers Peabody, son of one of the three great New England families. By the early 20th century a case could be made that the Peabodies had supplanted the Cabots and the Lodges as the most distinguished name in the area. She had for all intents and purposes arrived socially, having married into American aristocracy. But it was not to last. From the Corset to the Brassiere Up to this time, an unhealthy and painful device called a corset narrowed an adult women's waist to 13 or fewer inches. The corset is attributed to Catherine de Médicis, wife of King Henri II of France. She enforced a ban on thick waists at court attendance during the 1550s. For nearly 350 years, women's primary means of support was the corset, with laces and stays made of whalebone or metal. In 1875, designer Susan Taylor Converse created a garment called the “Union Under-Flannel” from woolen fabric. The garment is different to previous items as it has no-bones, eyelets, laces or pulleys. The garment was patented by manufacturers George Frost and George Phelps, but never gained much attention. In 1889, French-born corset-maker Herminie Cadolle invented a two-part undergarment. The top half of her 1889 invention was "designed to sustain the bosom and supported by the shoulders." (The bottom half was a corset that covered only the waist and rear.) She called it the 'Well-Being' or 'Bien-être'. Introduced in Paris, the Bien-être resembled a Victorian bikini. But Cadolle's far-sighted design seems to have been kept a close secret among her select customers. Later in 1893, Marie Tucek patented the first brassiere. Her device included separate pockets for the breasts, straps that went over the shoulder which were fastened by hook-and-eye closures. It looked very much like modern bras today, but Marie apparently failed to successfully market the patent. In 1910, Polly Jacob had just purchased a sheer evening gown for one of her social events. At that time, the only acceptable undergarment was a corset stiffened with whalebone. Polly found that the whalebones visibly poked out around the plunging neckline and under the sheer fabric. Dissatisfied with this arrangement, she worked with her maid to stitch two silk handkerchiefs together with some pink ribbon and cord. Polly's new undergarment complimented the new fashions introduced at the time. Family and friends almost immediately asked Polly to create brassieres for them, too. One day, she received a request for one of her contraptions from a stranger, who offered a dollar for her efforts. She knew then that this could become a viable business. The corset's reign was beginning to topple. Polly was the first to patent an undergarment named 'Brassiere' derived from the old French word for 'upper arm'. On November 3, 1914, the U.S. Patent Office issued a patent for the 'Backless Brassiere'. Her patent was for a device that was lightweight, soft and separated the breasts naturally. Polly christened her business with the name Caresse Crosby. While a definite improvement, her brassiere did not offer breasts a lot of support, and were more flattening than flattering. In fact, the breast flattening style was popularized by the Flapper look during the Roaring Twenties. With the popularity of actresses like Marilyn Monroe and Jane Russell, the present breast-enhancing style gained popularity during the thirties and forties. Running a business either was not enjoyable to Polly or she failed to properly market the product, for she soon sold the brassiere patent to the Warner Brothers Corset Company in Bridgeport, Connecticut, for $1,500 (or over $25,600 in today's money). Shortly afterwards, in 1917, the U.S. War Industries Board asked women to stop buying corsets to free up metal for war production. This step liberated some 28,000 tons of metal, enough to build two battleships. It has been said that the bra took off the way it did in large part because of World War I. The Great War shook up gender roles, putting many women to work in factories and uniforms for the first time. Women needed practical, comfortable undergarments. Warner went on to earn more than fifteen million dollars from the bra patent over the next thirty years. During the flat-chested Flapper era in the 1920’s, a Russian immigrant named Ida Rosenthal noticed that a bra that fit one woman did not fit another woman of the same bra size. With the help of her husband William, they founded Maidenform. Ida was responsible for grouping women into bust size categories (cup sizes) and developed bras for every stage of life (puberty to maturity). In the 1930s, Warner produces the first popular all-elastic bra, which shows off a woman's curves. Polly Divorces Richard Peabody and Remarries After Polly sold her brassiere patent, she had two children: a son, William Jacob in 1916, and a daughter, Polly ("Poleen") the following year. Her husband Richard Peabody was a well-educated but undirected man and a reluctant father. She found he had only three real interests, all acquired at Harvard: to play, to drink, and to turn out, at any hour, to chase fire engines. He would soon suffer the personal consequences of his WWI experiences and became an alcoholic. Polly's life was difficult during the war years and when her husband returned home, significantly changed, her life soon changed abruptly too. The catalyst for Polly Peabody's transformation was her introduction and eventual marriage to Harry Grew Crosby, a wealthy scion of a socially prominent Boston family and another veteran and victim of the recent war. Harry attended private schools and until age 19 and he appeared to be well on the path to a comfortable life as a member of the upper middle class. His experiences in World War I changed everything. In the pattern of other sons of the elite from New England, he volunteered for the American Field Service Ambulance Corps. He served in the Second Battle of Verdun. After the Battle of Orme, his section (the 29th, attached to the 120th French Division) was cited for bravery, and in 1919 Crosby was awarded the Croix de Guerre. While completing school after WWI, Harry met Polly. She was 28, six years older than Harry, with two small children. By some accounts, Harry fell in love with Mrs. Peabody in about two hours. He confessed his love for her in the Tunnel of Love at the amusement park. Two weeks later they made love. Their scandalous courtship was the gossip of blue-blood Boston. Polly finally divorced Richard Peabody who was in and out of sanitariums fighting his alcohol abuse, and on September 9, 1922 Harry and Polly were married. Two days later they moved to France to join other American expatriates, probably much to the relief of their respective families. Harry at first worked for his famous uncle, American capitalist J.P. Morgan, who was also Harry's godfather, in a job arranged for him in a Paris bank. But he soon tired of work. Polly and Harry purchased a race horse and then two more. They traveled to North Africa where it is reported they first smoked opium, a habit to which they would return again and again. From 1922 to 1925, the Crosbys led the life of the rich expatriates. They lived a glamorous and luxurious lifestyle that included an "open marriage," a mutual suicide pact, and cremation instructions they carried with them. Their lifestyle was financed by selling the bonds and stocks whose dividends were previously the basis of Harry's income. Founded the Black Sun Press After publishing two volumes that they were unhappy with, the Crosbys found a master printer named Roger Lescaret whose previous work had been largely funeral notices. He printed Harry’s poems in a fine edition. Harry and Caresse were very happy with the book, Red Skeletons. It contained illustrations by their friend Alastair (Hans Henning von Voight). The decided to found a press, first called éditions Narcisse— after their black whippet, Narcisse Noir. It was created to publish its founders’ attempts at verse in beautifully bound, hand-set books. By the time the name of the press was changed in mid-1928 to the Black Sun Press, the careers of both the Caresse and Harry Crosby were in high gear. The Black Sun Press is famous for having published lavishly bound, typographically impeccable versions of unusual books, including The Fall of the House of Usher, their Hindu Love Book, and letters by Henry James to Walter Berry, Harry’s cousin. As their literary tastes matured, they began to publish the works of their Parisian literary friends. This included D. H. Lawrence’s The Sun and Escaped Cock (sometimes reprinted under the title The Man Who Died); James Joyce’s Tales Told of Shem and Shaun (work — later incorporated into Finnegans Wake; and short stories by Kay Boyle. In 1929, their best year, they published fourteen works by James Joyce, Ernest Hemingway and Ezra Pound, among others. Caresse published her own book of poetry, Crosses of Gold. In 1928, however, Harry Crosby met Josephine Noyes Rotch, whom he would call the "Youngest Princess of the Sun" and the "Fire Princess." She was descended from a family that first settled in Provincetown on Cape Cod in 1690. Josephine would inspire Crosby's next collection of poems called Transit of Venus. Miss Rotch was twenty, ten years younger than Harry. The two fell in love. In a letter to his mother, dated July 24, 1928, Crosby wrote: I am having an affair with a girl I met (not introduced) at the Lido. She is twenty and has charm and is called Josephine. I like girls when they are very young before they have any minds. Josephine and Harry had an ongoing affair until she married, when it ceased. Then Josephine Bigelow's new husband got busy with school, and Josephine contacted Harry again. Their affair rekindled, they traveled to Detroit and checked into an expensive, $12 a day hotel as husband and wife. For four days they took meals in their room, smoked opium, battled, and made love. On December 7, 1929, the lovers returned to New York where they agreed that Josephine should return to Boston to her husband. But on December 9 she had delivered a 36-line poem to Crosby who was staying with Caresse at the Savoy-Plaza Hotel. The last line of the poem is: Death is our marriage. On December 9, Harry Crosby made the following entry into his notebook: One is not in love unless one desires to die with one's beloved. There is only one happiness it is to love and to be loved. These are Crosby's very last entries into his journal. On December 10, 1929, in an apparent suicide pact, Harry was found in bed with a .25 caliber bullet hole in his right temple next to Josephine, who had a matching hole in her left temple. Harry was still clutching the pistol in one hand, Josephine in the other. Harry apparently shot Josephine and then, according to the coroner, several hours later, he shot himself. After Harry Crosby's suicide, Caresse continued her writing and publishing work at Black Sun. She also established Crosby Continental Editions, a book company that published paperback books by Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Dorothy Parker, among others. In 1937, at age 47, she married Selbert Young, a football player nearly twenty years her junior. She bought and renovated Hampton Manor, a ruined but splendid home in Bowling Green, Virginia. She opened an art gallery in Washington D.C. and started Portfolio, a magazine about art and literature. She also was politically active and founded the organization Women Against War. She later bought a castle north of Rome that gave her the title of Principessa, and later mountain-top retreats in Cyprus and Delphi. Thus she had homes in Bowling Green, Virginia, in Washington, D.C., a sprawling apartment at 137 East Fifty-Fourth Street in New York City, as well as her residences in Europe. Henry Miller and Opus Pistorum In Paris during 1933, Caresse had met Henry Miller. When he returned to the U.S. in 1940, he confessed to Caresse his lack of success in getting his work published. Miller's autobiographical book Tropic of Cancer was banned in the U.S. as pornographic, and he could get no other work published. She invited him to take a room in her New York apartment where she infrequently lived, which he accepted, though she did not provide him with money. Desperate for cash, Miller fell to churning out pornography on commission for an Oklahoma oil baron, but after two 100-page stories that brought him $200, he could do no more. Now he wanted to tour the United States by car and write about it. He got a $750 advance, and persuaded the oil man's agent to advance him another $200. He was preparing to leave on the trip but still have not provided the work promised. He thought then of Caresse Crosby. She was already pitching in ideas and pieces of writing to Anaïs Nin's New York City smut club for fun, not money. Caresse was facile and clever, wrote easily and quickly, with little effort. Caresse accepted Henry's proposal. She wrote the title given her by Henry Miller "Opus Pistorum" at the top, and started right in. Henry left for his car tour of America. Caresse churned out 200 pages and the collector's agent asked for more. Caresse's smut was just what the oil man wanted-no literary aspirations-just plain sex. In Caresse the agent had found the basic pornographic Henry Miller. Caresse churned out another 200 pages, spending her time writing while her husband, Bert Young, fell into a drunken stupor every night. In her diary, Anaïs Nin observed that everyone who wrote pornography with her wrote out of a self that was opposite to her or his identity, but identical with his desire. Polly or Caresse experienced years of social constraints imposed by her upper-class association in New York. She had a doomed and troublesome romanticism with Harry Crosby. She participated in a decade or more of intellectual lovers in Paris during the 1920s. Perhaps it was a release for Caresse just to take love as casual lust and let it go at that. In 1950 Caresse divorced Bert Young and moved to Italy where she planned to create an artists colony. She published an autobiography in 1953 called The Passionate Years. Caresse died in relative obscurity in 1970, but she lived long enough to see the bra go through a number of transformations and become immensely popular all over the world. All kinds of bras have been created for every conceivable purpose, to do all the things that corsets have done in previous generations: minimize, uplift, show cleavage, maximize, or plain show off. Training bras for newly developing young girls seem like an oxymoron, and in reality aren't really meant for support as much as for camouflage. Jogging or sports bras are a more recent innovation for the woman who wants to work out, and some are meant to be worn as outerwear. Statistics show the average American woman today owns six bras. Out of those six, one of is a strapless bra and one is a color other than white. Despite all of the many advances and improvements in brassieres, perhaps a Surgeon General's warning is still required. In 1994, Berbel Zumner, age 23, was walking through a park in Vienna. Berbel had large breasts and wore a brassiere with underwire support to support her ample frame. She was killed when lightening struck her brassiere. A movie about Harry and Caresse is said to be in development by Fine Line Features. Only a director has been attached to the project, and no completion date has been set. By Brian Phelps Licensed for other's use under the GNU Free Documentation License (GNU FDL or simply GFDL). References and Sources American Heritage of Invention & Technology, Spring 1997, Volume 12/Number 4 Daily Record (Scotland) 21 October 1994 Mary Phelps Jacob Inventor of the Week Archive November 2001 (December 2003) "Caresse Crosby, Infield." Cosmic Baseball Association, 1998 (December 2003) "The Brassiere." Useless Information. (December 2003) Bra sizes Sizes.com July 11, 2001 (June 2004) Edward Germain, Editor, Harry Crosby, Shadows of the Sun: The Diaries of Harry Crosby. Santa Barbara, California: Black Sparrow Press. 1977. Geoffrey Wolff, Black Sun. Random House: New York. 1976. Shelley Cox, "Introduction: The Black Sun Press," ICarbS 3:2 (1977), 3-4. Ethlie Ann Vare and Greg Ptacek. Patently Female (John Wiley, 2002) p. 134-139. Caresse Crosby The Passionate Years (Ecco Press). A Brief History Of The Nipple, by Amil Niazi. November 15, 2005 (December 21, 2005)

@1 [5412] [S423]

@1 [5414] [S422]

@1 [5415] [S80]

Maurice Joseph Clagett / Emma Louise Noble

Husband: Maurice Joseph Clagett
Born: at:
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Father: William Henry Clagett
Mother: Mary Adele Clare
Wife: Emma Louise Noble
Born: at:
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Children
Name: Brice Clagett [7887]
Born: 1889at: "Beall's Pleasure", Prince Georges County, Maryland
Married: at:  
Died: 1951at:
Spouses: Sarah Fleming McAdoo


Pedigree Chart for: Maurice Joseph Clagett

      /--Walter  Clagett 
   /--Darius  Clagett 
   |  \--Martha  Williams 
/--William Henry  Clagett 
|  |  /--John  Brice  IV
|  \--Providence Dorsey  Brice 
|     \--Sarah  Lane 
|--Maurice Joseph  Clagett 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Mary Adele  Clare 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Emma Louise Noble

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Emma Louise  Noble 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

[7887]

One child. Sally was a flower girl at her father's wedding to Eleanor Wilson at the White House in 1914; grad. cum laude from Bryn Mawr College; director of Travelers Aid Society of Washington; member, President's Committee on Employment of the Physically Handicapped-she rec. a Distinguished Service Award posthumously. He was a reporter for several newspapers including the Washington Post & Washington Star; Associated Press correspondent, White House (1914-1917); executive secretary to the US Secretary of the Treasury (1917-1918); professor, National U Law School; Judge, Municipal Court & Municipal Ct. of Appeals, Washington, DC (Files of Brice McAdoo Clagett). They lived at "Beall's Pleasure," Prince George's Co., MD & Washington, DC.

Chester Loveland / Rosannah Elvira Winters

Husband: Chester Loveland
Born: 30 Dec 1817at: Madison, Geauga, Ohio, United States
Married: 15 Jan 1846at: Nauvoo,Hancock,Illinois, USA
Died: 5 Mar 1886at: Calls Fort, Box Elder, Utah, USA
Father: Chauncey Loveland
Mother: Nancy Graham
Notes: [10370]
Sources: [10371] [10372]
Wife: Rosannah Elvira Winters
Born: 6 Dec 1825at: Columbus,Bartholomew,Indiana
Died: 13 Apr 1896at: Albion,Cassia,Idaho
Father:
Mother:
Notes: [10182]
Children
Name: Sarah Sophia Loveland
Born: 2 Nov 1848at: Pottawattamie,Iowa
Died: 25 Feb 1923at: Rexburg,Madison,Idaho
Spouses:

Name: Don Carlos Loveland [10188]
Born: 11 May 1851at: Bountiful, Davis, Utah, United States
Married: at:  
Died: 12 Dec 1911at: Albion,Cassia,Idaho
Spouses: Eliza Rosetta Harper

Name: Seth Loveland
Born: 3 Aug 1854at: Bountiful, Davis, Utah, United States
Died: 25 Oct 1872at:
Spouses:

Name: Nancy Jane Loveland
Born: 25 Apr 1859at: Bountiful, Davis, Utah, United States
Died: 26 Jun 1906at: Niter,Bannock,Idaho
Spouses:

Name: David Loveland
Born: 15 Aug 1861at: Calls Fort, Box Elder, Utah, USA
Died: 13 May 1949at: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
Spouses:

Name: Fannie Rosannah Loveland
Born: 9 Jan 1864at: Calls Fort, Box Elder, Utah, USA
Died: 18 Sep 1907at: Oakley,Cassia,Idaho
Spouses:

Name: Eldorus Bertram Loveland [10189]
Born: 15 Dec 1866at: Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah, United States
Died: 26 Oct 1935at: Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah, United States
Spouses:


Pedigree Chart for: Chester Loveland

      /--Elisha  Loveland 
   /--Levi  Loveland 
   |  \--Hannah  Hills 
/--Chauncey  Loveland 
|  |  /--Ebenezer  Hills 
|  \--Esther  Hills 
|     \--Hannah  Arnold 
|--Chester  Loveland 
|     /--
|  /--Joseph   Graham 
|  |  \--
\--Nancy  Graham 
   |  /--
   \--Nancy  Sanderson 
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Rosannah Elvira Winters

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Rosannah Elvira  Winters 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

[10370]

Sources for this record are many and varied; Loveland Genealogy, Vol 3. Pg 200 - 215. Nauvoo Temple Records, Film 2755 Book A. Slg. p. 383, East Bountiful Ward Records Film 6213. Deweyville Ward Records Film 6173, pt. 2. Family records submitted to LDS Archives.

[10182]

Rosannah's parents were David Winters and Jane Rosbrough.

[10189]

Eldorus also married Hulda Korth Gibbs 30 Sep 1931, Logan, Cache, Utah. They were not sealed.

@1 [10371] [S44]

@1 [10372] [S549]

@1 [10188] [S44]

Wilhelm II. Jung / Elisabeth Bremser

Husband: Wilhelm II. Jung
Born: at:
Married: at:  
Died: at: Wiesbaden, Hesse-Nassau, Prussia, Germany
Father:
Mother:
Wife: Elisabeth Bremser
Born: at: Mappershain, Heidenrod, Rheingau-Taunus-Kreis, Hessen, Germany
Died: at:
Father:
Mother: Maria Katharina Bremser
Children
Name: Elisabeth Jung
Born: 1898at: Berlin
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Spouses: Karl Pollartz


Pedigree Chart for: Wilhelm II. Jung

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Wilhelm II.  Jung 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Elisabeth Bremser

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Elisabeth  Bremser 
|     /--Georg Philipp  Bremser 
|  /--Philipp David  Bremser 
|  |  \--Eva Katharina  Gabel 
\--Maria Katharina  Bremser 
   |  /--Georg Philipp  Bremser 
   \--Maria  Zimmer 
      \--

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