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Sampson Diuguid / Martha Bradley Patteson

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Sampson Diuguid / Martha Bradley Patteson

Husband: Sampson Diuguid
Born: 29 Oct 1795[1007] [1008] at: Bent Creek, Appomattox, Virginia, USA
Married: 4 Nov 1817at: Virginia, United States
Died: 15 Feb 1856[1009] at: Lynchburg, Campbell, Virginia, USA
Father: George Diuguid
Mother: Nancy Sampson
Notes: [1010]
Sources: [1007] [1008] [1009] [1011]
Wife: Martha Bradley Patteson
Born: 10 Apr 1798at: Stout Spring, Appotomox Co., Virginia, USA
Died: 5 Sep 1848at: Virginia, United States
Father: David Patteson
Mother: Sarah Oglesby
Children
Name: David P. Diuguid [1051] [1052]
Born: 25 Aug 1818at:
Married: at:  
Died: 4 Jul 1864at:
Spouses: Mary Parham Sturdevant

Name: George Alexander Diuguid [1012] [1013]
Born: 5 Nov 1820at: Lynchburg, Campbell, Virginia
Married: at:  
Died: 30 Mar 1893at:
Spouses: Paulina Ann Davidson

Name: Harriett Lucinda Diuguid [1054] [1053]
Born: 7 Jun 1833at: Lynchburg, Campbell Co., Virginia, USA
Married: at:  
Died: 19 Aug 1921[1053] at: Lynchburg, Campbell Co., Virginia, USA
Spouses: William Diuguid

Name: Stephen D. Diuguid [1055]
Born: at:
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: David P. Diuguid [12452]
Born: at:
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Harriett Diuguid [12454]
Born: at:
Died: at:
Spouses:


Pedigree Chart for: Sampson Diuguid

      /--William  Diuguid  Sr.
   /--William  Diuguid  Jr.
   |  \--Jean  Henry 
/--George  Diuguid 
|  |  /--Alexander  Moss 
|  \--Ann  Moss 
|     \--Elizabeth  Clopton 
|--Sampson  Diuguid 
|     /--
|  /--Stephen  Sampson 
|  |  \--
\--Nancy  Sampson 
   |  /--
   \--Sarah  Johnson 
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Martha Bradley Patteson

      /--David  Patteson 
   /--Obadiah  Patteson 
   |  \--
/--David  Patteson 
|  |  /--
|  \--Agnes   
|     \--
|--Martha Bradley  Patteson 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Sarah  Oglesby 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

[1010]

Sampson Diuguid was the first member of the Diuguid Family in Lynchburg, Va. There he started what is known at the present as The Diuguid Funeral Home which has been in operation continuously for 170 years although it passed out of the Diuguid Family in 1950 (see page 263). It is one of the oldest, if not the oldest, undertaking concerns in Virginia. This business was started by Sampson Diuguid in 1817 as a cabinet making shop. At that time and for some years afterward, it was the practice for all coffins to be made custom order by cabinet makers. Many of the coffins manufactured by Sampson Diuguid in his pioneer stock were made of mahogany, and this material was transported from Baltimore, Md. down the Bay and up the James River to Lynchburg. At first the firm was Diuguid and Winston, but Sampson Diuguid bow ht out his partner. The firm was at first a cabinet making and an undertaking business. After 1820, Sampson Diuguid began formally an under­taking business and continued the business under his control until his death in 1856. The management then passed to his sons, David P. Diuguid and George Alex­ander Diuguid, and after 1864, George Alexander Diuguid was proprietor. In May 1880, the firm became G. A. Diuguid and Son, and from 1893 until Sept. 1922 the business was incorporated as W. D. Diuguid, Inc. with William Davidson Diuguid as president, G. A. Diuguid, vice president, Mary S. Diuguid, Secretary and Treas. After the death of her father, William Davidson Diuguid on 11 November 1927, Mary Sampson Diuguid, carried on the business with the help of Mr. Hudgins until 1950. The business then passed out of the Diuguid Family. Sampson Diuguid was a valued citizen, serving as a member of the Town Council and of the Volunteer Hose Company. Over his desk in his office hung a "silhouette" of an old character called "Molly Peckerwood". His real name was James Moseley. He had been gently reared in the Moose Creek Valley neighborhood, but had fallen into intemperate habits after securing employment in Lynchburg, Va. as the book-keeper of Mr. Christopher Anthony. During the brief periods when he could work, he had a habit of pecking away with his pen on the wood of his desk, hence the nickname "Molly Peckerwood". After the death of Mr. Anthony and in his later years, he was befriended by Sampson Diuguid, who sug­gested him, because of his picturesque appeal, as a subject of a silhouettes named Brown visiting the city at that time. So it came about that "Molly Peckerwood's" figure hung over the desk in Sampson Diuguid's office until at long last its identity was almost lost sight of and people wondered who the old man was. Information from Miss Mary Sampson Diuguid, great granddaughter of Sampson Diuguid shows that she owned the silhouette back in 1941. She stated that there was an interesting article in "Antiques Magazine" in Oct. 1941, pages 182 and 183 by Lucille McWane Watson stating that she was certain that the silhouette is the work of the great eighteenth century silhouettest, William H. Brown, who immortalized many of the most distinguished people of his day. The charming title given it by Iucille McWane Watson was "Ne'er Do Well Among the Well-to-Do". ----------------------------------------------- Sampson Diuguid From C. H. Wynne, "Sketches and Recollections of Lynchburg by the Oldest Inhabitant," Richmond, Virginia 1858. Sampson Diuguid was a native of Appomattox County, from which, many years since, he removed, making his home in Lynchburg, where, till the time of his death,. he resided, an honored and beloved citizen. Whilst John and Hardin Murrel were diligently employed on one side of the street, dis­pensing from the post-office good and ill, Sampson Diuguid, on the other side, was equally occupied in another department of life and death. Combining the occupation of cabinet-maker and undertaker, he industriously pursued his avocations for the benefit of the living and the dead; and his services to the former, will long remain visible throughout the whole section of country around Lynchburg, in that beautiful, durable furniture, by him manufac­tured, differing so widely from those slight showy articles procured from the Northern cities. Whilst visible to the passers-by at his occupation, slowly and surely would the last solemn messenger, Death, render it often necessary for the services of Sampson Diuguid to be called in requisition for the departed. His office of undertaker, so frequently placing him amid scenes of distress, it might natu­rally have been supposed that even a very tender heart would become habituated to such things. Yet often has the fine manly face of Sampson Diuguid been seen suffused with tears on funeral occasions, and frequently at the grave he has with difficulty been able to command his feelings. How different from men of this occupation described by Dickens. Witness the hard, obdurate heart of Sowerberry, and the easy, careless levity of Oram and Joram. Sampson Diuguid's upright, useful life was closed during the winter of 1856, and this brief notice cannot be more appropriately closed than by aa few words treasured up in memory from the editorial of the Lynchburg Virginian, announcing his death­" And, after having consigned many thousand to the narrow chambers of death, he was himself borne to the county of Appomattox, there to repose be­neath the clods of the valley!" Courtesy of Bess Christian Thompson, Fairfax, Virginia. ----------------------------------------------- The following copied from "Lynchburg and its Neighbors": Sampson Diuguid died in 1856 and was succeeded in the business by George A. Diuguid. He died in 1887 and his place was taken by the late William D. Diuguid who made many improvements in the business. The carriage by which caskets are wheeled into church, now used by all undertakers, was an invention of William D. Diuguid. For three generations in Lynchburg, this family have closed the eyes of the dead and have given the bereaved considerate attention. No men were ever more respected or honored in a community than these three good men.

[1051]

He was a partner with his brother, George A. Diuguid in the management of the Diuguid funeral Home after the death of their father in 1856 and until he, David P. Diuguid, died in 1864. He was also prominent in Masonic work.

[1012]

Diuguid Undertakers During the Civil War George A. Diuguid 1821-1893 The Diuguid mortuary was originally established in 1817 by Sampson Diuguid and a Mr. Winston. Their business, which is still in operation today, is the second oldest funeral home in the United States, and the oldest in the South. It was the only undertaking establishment in Lynchburg until the late 1860s. During the Civil War, Sampson Diuguid's son, George A. Diuguid ran the family business, which was responsible for both civilian and military burials. Diuguid and his workshop ultimately buried over 3000 Union and Confederate soldiers in Lynchburg, or sent their bodies home for burial. George Diuguid kept excellent records of every burial or removal during the war. He made notations of each soldier's name, military unit, place of death, date of burial, gravesite, and coffin or body measurements. His precise mortuary records enabled the federal goverment to remove the remains of 200 Union soldiers in 1866 to a national cemetery near Petersburg. They also enabled the women of the Lynchburg Confederate Memorial Association to mark each soldier's grave with its own headstone in the early twentieth-century. "Diuguid Undertakers During the Civil War," 28 August 2001 http://www.gravegarden.org/diuguid.htm (December 28, 2002) On 11 May 1885, one month before the death of George Alexander Diuguid, "Decoration Day", a day celebrated by honoring the Confederate war dead, was termed a "brilliant affair." An outstanding achievement of the Confederate Ladies Memorial Association was the placement at each soldier's grave of a stone giving the man's initials, his state, and the unit to which he belonged. The Virginia legislature appropriated funds for this work and it was the unique records kept by George A. Diuguid that made it possible.

[1054]

Harriet Diuguid wrote a letter ca 1903 to her Cousin Lizzie (Mary Elizabeth Diuguid) who married William Alston Bourland in Nov 1841. In it Harriet listed her address as 117 S. Jefferson St., Roanoke, VA, which was the address of her son, John Everett Diuguid. We are indebted to the descendants of Mary Elizabeth Diguid for sharing this letter which preserved so much information that might otherwise be lost. Elizabeth Randolph Shemwell (Skerritt) and her family were on their way home to Rochester, New York from Benton, Kentucky where they had attended the funeral of her sister, Julia Shemwell (Cotton) when their car was stolen and the original letter along with her Diuguid family research was lost. We are thankful that we have copies of her letter which gives so much information on the family of George Diuguid and Nancy Sampson. Dear (Cousin) Lizzie, I have always heard that our forefathers were originally French Hugenots who fled to Scotland from religious persecution and remained there until they called themselves Scots. Some time way back in the seventeen hundreds, four Diuguid brothers came to America, two of them settled in Virginia, one in what is now Kentucky and one in Georgia or Mississippi. The one from whom we are descended, I do not know his name, but suppose it was William Diuguid. He had a son named William D. who settled near Bent Creek in what is now the lower part of Appomattox County. Said William Diuguid had a son named George D.(iuguid) who was a Revolutionary soldier and he was our grandfather. He had seven sons and four daughters. William D. (son of George) married Miss Susannah Thornhill. They had eleven children and raised all except one who was, killed when he was eleven years old by a runaway horse. All of his family have passed away until you come to his grandchildren and they are very many in number. George Diuguid's next son, Sampson Diuguid, married Miss Martha Patteson. They had ten children but only raised three of this number, namely: David, George and Harriet, the writer of this record, and I am the only representative of that generation of Sampson. Stephen Diuguid married Miss Furbush. They had three children only and raised two of them, a son and a daughter. The daughter is still living - a Mrs. Pelter at her father's old homestead in Campbell Co., Va. George Diuguid (11) married Miss Betsy Christian from near Richmond. They moved to Calloway Co., Ky. directly after their marriage. They had only two children. Their first son named Christian died when 6 or 8 years old of measles at Gauley Bridge in West Va. Uncle George had another son, William Diuguid, who lived to be 83 years old, raised seven sons and two daughters. His death occasioned the first link in his family to be broken. He was about ten or twelve years old when his father, Uncle George Diuguid died. Then his mother wrote to my father, Sampson Diuguid, to come to Kentucky and move her back to Va. as she wanted him to help her raise her two sons. He went at once to help her. They started on their journey back the third day after he arrived, and when they reached West Virginia, the death of her son, Chrlstian occurred. After his burial, they continued their journey to Virginia, and Cousin William lived with my father, he and his mother until he was 25 years old. He then returned to Murray, Calloway Co. Ky. where he spent his remaining days. My brother, George, and Cousin William were educated together, learned their trades together, and lived as brothers until Cousin William moved back to Kentucky. James Diuguid married Miss Snead. They had one child, a son. He was killed in the Confederate War in the Battle of the Wilderness. Uncle James Settled in Salem, Va. and lived until his death in that place. Uncle Edwin Diuguid was married but he moved out to Missouri in or near Franklin Co., but I never heard whom he married. He never returned to Va. He died and left three children, two daughters and one son. He and his son both followed the same course in life. They prospected in lead mines, but neither of them made any success in their occupation. Uncle Jacob married Miss Caroline Patteson the first marriage. She did not live but a few years, died and left one son, James E. Diuguid. He did not live many years. He left one son named after himself. He is now living in Carroll Co., Ky. and has a family. I do not know much about them. Uncle Jacob's second wife, Miss Jett, of Kentucky, died,, They had four children: Hiram, Mrs. Dr. Gaines of Warsaw, Mrs. Owen of Ghent, and Mrs. J. I. Baker of Jett Co. Ky. This closed the account of Grandfather's sons. His four daughters were Judy, who never married; Mary married William H. Patteson, an uncle of mine on my mother's side, and moved to Indiana. They had only one child. She is still living in Chicago, Mrs. Annie Anthony. Nancy married David B. Patteson. They had four children: three daughters and a son, Mrs. Lucy Christian, wife of Dr. W. Diuguid Christian, Mrs. Ann Price who died in Ky., Rozella died when just 17 years old and Cousin David Marcellus is the son, you know, who is at the Confederate Home in Oldham Cost Ky. and I expect he is getting quite feeble by this time. He and I are the only ones of the old ones now living. He is six years older than I am, living in the third year of borrowed time -that brings me in my 73rd year, but I am happy to tell you that I am not helpless by any means. I am able to help about domestic affairs. As yet I do not like to be waited on but will do all I can as long as I am able to do. Aunt Betsy Diuguid-is the last one of Grandfather George Diuguid's children to mention. She married a Baptist preacher named Mace Harris and had several children. I knew all of her daughters. All of them are dead. She had several sons but I do not know anything of them. In fact I never met them at all. About two years ago, a Mrs. Cummings came to Lynchburg, she said to hunt her Diuguid relatives. She said her grandmother was Ann Diuguids her grandfather was William Harriss, her mother was a Jeffries. They live in Selma, Alabama. Mrs. Cummings resembles the Diuguid family very much indeed. Her mother is a widow, has three daughters and Mrs. Cummings is the oldest, the only one who is married. She has one child, a girl. Her sisters have names of the Diuguid family up to the present date. I am not able to trace her family relationship up. I sincerely wish I could,. Perhaps she is a descendant of the original Diuguid brother who came from Scotland and settled in Georgia or Mississippi. I do not mean him really but a son or a grandson of his and perhaps the Harriss name of her grandfather might be related in some way to Aunt Betsy Harris. If you can find out anything of this connection I would be more than glad for you to let me know concerning it. In the last letter I had from you, you asked me for the record of the Diuguid family. I have never been able to get the one Aunt Judy Diuguid had when she lived at Uncle Jacobs. I wrote for it but they said it had gotten lost. Dr. William Diuguid Christian had one also but I received the same account of that as I did Aunt Judy's. It had gotten lost in moving so I concluded I would try to do the best I could with my knowledge to write you all as I know of no other source from which you will gather as much as you will in this letter. I left you too quickly in telling you about Uncle Jacob's life transactions so I will have to go back and finish his course out for you. He was married four times. I told you of twice so now comes the third time. This time he married near St. Louis or Lewisville, I do not know which. This wife was either a schoolteacher or owned and ran a cattle raising farm, I do not know which. Indeed I do not know her name. He had no children by his last two wives. His fourth wife was a widow Warfield, nee Miss Joyce Diuguid, a daughter of Cousin George E. Diuguid, perhaps the descendant of the brother from Scotland who settled in Kentucky. Uncle Jacob's fourth wife had a sister named Mrs. Susan Drake, who had a daughter named Georgie. I saw them once. They came to visit my father in Lynchburg about 1840. 1 was then about ten years old. This last wife had a daughter by her Warfield husband who is a Mrs. Dortch, somewhere near Trenton, Ky., if I am not mistaken. I do not know where Uncle Jacob's last wife is. She outlived him. She was the first lady Uncle Jacob ever addressed? and after refusing him the first time, she married Rev. Warfield and he died and her his widow. She remained a widow whilst Uncle Jacob married and lost three wives. Then he returned and married his first love. Well, Cousin Lizzie, as I imagine your patience has been entirely worn out, I will draw this long letter to a close hoping that the limit of your patience has not been so severely tried that you will not honor me with a reply. I wish I could come to see you instead of write to you but I have put the visiting time off too long. Perhaps I could not make the trip safely. My only regret is that I did not undertake it whilst Cousin William was alive and I deeply regret not writing this letter because I think he would have enjoyed it so very much. I wish some of you all western relations would pay us a visit. Indeed we would be glad to see you or any of your father's family for I certainly love to see my relatives and it I cannot see them I love to write them. So with very much love for you and yours - your entire family, I will close this letter hoping that you will write me very soon. Give my love to your mother and to your sisters and brothers when you see them. My address: (Signed) Mrs. H. L. Diuguid, 111 N. Jefferson St., Roanoke, Va. It is said that there is a street in West Salem, VA. called Diuguid Lane and that they Harriett and William Diuguid lived there. However there a deed on file in Salem, Va., Roanoke Co Court House in Book F, page 273, dated 21 July 1858 stating that wiliam Diuguid bought from William Deaton and wife, Mary K., lot 53, Salem, Va. being fronted on Main Street, sixteen poles deep to back on Clay Street. He paid some of the price and gave a lein for $400.00 due on 1 July 1858 for the balance.

@1 [14293] [S39]

@1 [1007] [S39]

  • @2Page: 1850DAR ID #87317

@1 [1008] [S216]

  • @2Page: p. 92

@1 [1009] [S39]

  • @2Page: DAR ID #87317

@1 [1011] [S89]

@1 [1052] [S89]

  • @2Page: p. 258

@1 [1013] [S89]

  • @2Page: p. 259

@1 [1053] [S89]

  • @2Page: p 268-274
  • @4Data:
    • Date: 27 Feb 2000

@1 [1055] [S89]

@1 [12452] [S89]

@1 [12454] [S89]

Eldad Phelps / Abigail Simmons

Husband: Eldad Phelps
Born: 26 Apr 1768at: Enfield, Hartford, Connecticut, United States
Married: 18 Jan 1787at:
Died: 7 Feb 1842at: Castile, Wyoming, USA, New York, u. S.
Father: Eldad Phelps
Mother: Jemima Pease
Sources: [4103]
Wife: Abigail Simmons
Born: at:
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Children

Pedigree Chart for: Eldad Phelps

      /--Israel  Phelps 
   /--David  Phelps  Sr.
   |  \--Rachel Jones  Clark 
/--Eldad  Phelps 
|  |  /--
|  \--Margaret  Colton 
|     \--
|--Eldad  Phelps 
|     /--Jonathan  Pease 
|  /--Pelatiah  Pease 
|  |  \--Elizabeth  Booth 
\--Jemima  Pease 
   |  /--Jonathan  Pease 
   \--Jemima  Booth 
      \--Mary  Harmon 

Pedigree Chart for: Abigail Simmons

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Abigail  Simmons 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

@1 [4103] [S44]

Robert Valentine Phelps / Eliza Martha Puzey

Husband: Robert Valentine Phelps
Born: 14 Feb 1820at: Ledbury, Herefordshire, England
Married: 3 Jan 1855at: Dunolly, Victoria, Australia
Died: 10 Jan 1905at: Dunolly, Victoria, Australia
Father: Robert Phelps
Mother: Harriet Moore
Notes: [6648]
Sources: [6649]
Wife: Eliza Martha Puzey
Born: 20 Apr 1837at: Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Died: 20 Jul 1927at:
Father:
Mother:
Children
Name: Frederick William Smithsend Phelps
Born: 1861at: Dunolly, Victoria, Australia
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Eliza Harriet Phelps
Born: 1857at: Dunolly, Victoria, Australia
Died: 23 Jan 1926at: Dunolly, Victoria, Australia
Spouses:

Name: Robert Law Smithsend Phelps
Born: 10 Feb 1858at: Dunolly, Victoria, Australia
Married: at:  
Died: 14 Oct 1916at: Wagga Wagga, New South Wales, Australia
Spouses: Maria Florence

Name: Louisa Blanche Phelps [5516]
Born: 1862at: Dunolly, Victoria, Australia
Married: at:  
Died: 19 Feb 1910at: Nathalia, Victoria, Australia
Spouses: Victor George Manning

Name: Alice Maude Phelps
Born: 1864at: Dunolly, Victoria, Australia
Married: at:  
Died: 15 Jun 1939at: Baimsdale, Victoria, Australia
Spouses: Thomas Arthur Rouse

Name: Esther Stella Phelps
Born: 1866at: Dunolly, Victoria, Australia
Died: 1866at: Dunolly, Victoria, Australia
Spouses:

Name: Catherine Anne Phelps
Born: 1867at: Dunolly, Victoria, Australia
Married: at:  
Died: 3 Nov 1968at: Nathalia, Victoria, Australia
Spouses: William Hughes , John Mawdsley

Name: William Frederick Law Phelps
Born: 1869at: Dunolly, Victoria, Australia
Died: 1870at: Dunolly, Victoria, Australia
Spouses:

Name: Jessie Ada Phelps
Born: 1871at:
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Spouses: Frederick Bernstein

Name: Edward Moore Phelps
Born: 28 Feb 1873at: Amherst, Victoria, Australia
Married: at:  
Died: 1932at: Waverly, New South Wales, Australia
Spouses: Annie Trim

Name: Stella Agnes Phelps
Born: 1875at: Dunolly, Victoria, Australia
Married: at:  
Died: 1944at: Wyalong West, New South Wales, Australia
Spouses: Richard Sharman

Name: Effie Phelps
Born: 1877at: Dunolly, Victoria, Australia
Married: at:  
Died: 18 Nov 1967at: Nathalia, Victoria, Australia
Spouses: James Isaac Milledge

Name: Amy Maria Florence Phelps
Born: 30 Nov 1881at: Dunolly, Victoria, Australia
Married: at:  
Died: 16 Jun 1956at: Springvale, Victoria, Australia
Spouses: Frank Ernest Allan


Pedigree Chart for: Robert Valentine Phelps

      /--Edward  Phelps 
   /--Robert  Phelps 
   |  \--
/--Robert  Phelps 
|  |  /--
|  \--Anne  Homes 
|     \--
|--Robert Valentine  Phelps 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Harriet  Moore 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Eliza Martha Puzey

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Eliza Martha  Puzey 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

[6648]

All of the data on Smithsend Phelps and his descendants is courtesy of Wendy Herne. In 1851 Robert Valentine moved to Australia. He was the beginning of an Australian branch of the Phelps family. Robert and his wife Eliza had several children; the oldest included Smithsend in his children's names. Obiturary-- Dunolly & Bet Bet Shire Express Death of Mr. R.V. Phelps Friday, 13th January, 1905 After a long illness Mr. Robert Valentine Phelps the veteran solicitor and one of the first pioneers of this district passed away on Tuesday evening at about nine o'clock. As our readers are aware Mr. Phelps had a stroke of paralysis some months ago, and his condition since that time, although fluctuating had been such as to preclude all hope of recovery. At times it almost appeared as if any moment would be his last, and again, time after time, there would be a wonderful rally. All the time, however, the sufferer was gradually getting weaker, but his frequent rallies after such a severe shock were proof of his remarkable vitality. His advanced age must also be taken into consideration. Had he lived till the 14th February next, he would have been 86 years of age. For the past three months the deceased gentleman had never been able to leave his bed, and during all that time his condition was such that he had to be watched night and day, and Mrs. Phelps and members of the family have most devotedly attended to him, and seen to his every possible comfort. Not a single thing was omitted that might add to the ease and peace of his last days. And the sufferer himself, although all his life long as active and energetic, bore his enforced retirement with extraordinary patience and cheerfulness. There was never a murmur from him. Indeed, it was pathetic, when the rallies took place, to see with what pleasure he called the attention by signs of those around him to a slight access of power in the ability to lift his arm and move his fingers. From first to last his devoted attendants were rewarded by the appreciation the patience showed of their affectionate ministrations. Although unable to speak connectedly he was conscious towards the last, and knew his wife and children, and uttered fragments of sentences meant to cheer them. The end came, if a little suddenly, quite peacefully. No doubt the continued intense heat hastened it. It is five years since the deceased sustained his first stroke, but he recovered from that. Mr. Phelps may well be regarded as having been one of Dunolly's most notable residents and in the record of the pioneers of the district and of the state, his name must occupy a prominent place. He had many and varied experiences in a new country, and his vigor, energy, and strength of character were noticeable even in those early strenuous days when the vigor and ardor of youth were manifest amid strange surroundings, demanding incessant watchfulness in a time full of adventure, and characterised by constant change. It was a strange romantic period, and comparatively few are left who engaged in its struggles and these are rapidly passing from amongst us. Mr. Phelps was one of the first white men to settle in this district. He arrived in 1851, some five years before the diggings here opened - having come across country with cattle at that time from Mt. Alexander. We understand he was associated for a time with the late Mr. Henry Norman Simpson in grazing pursuits, the run extending from about Maryborough to McIntyres. Mr. Phelps was an excellent raconteur when he chose, and his stories of those early times in Victoria, and in this locality, held his hearers breathless, although it was seldom, and too comparatively few, that he gave the pleasure of his reminiscences. Could these have been collected and arranged they would have formed a book of uncommon interest. For Victoria in those early days had much that was romantic and there was constant excitement. Mr. Phelps was one of the very first, if not the first, practising solicitors here, and maintained his connection with the courts of the district till some seven or eight years ago, practising in Dunolly, Tarnagulla, Avoca, Maryborough, and other places. His name was familiar over a wide extent of country, and he was known as an exceptionally clever and able lawyer. Indeed, his reputation as a lawyer extended throughout the state. His court stories of the “fifties” were always interesting, and very often amusing, when judge or magistrate sat in a rickety wooden building under which the pigs might be rooting and raising the flooring boards while cases were being heard. He could tell of his own experiences in the primitive “court houses”, at North Broadway, Dunolly, and elsewhere. Mr. Phelps thoroughly identified himself with his clients, and fought their cases as if they had been absolutely his own. He had an extensive legal knowledge, and point by point, inch by inch, he contested his ground. In his strong desire to do his utmost for his clients, he was at times impulsive, and always earnest and persistent, and occasionally came into collision with the bench, but his determination and ability were recognised, and also his entire devotion to his clients interests. All these latter knew that Mr. Phelps would leave no stone unturned to secure success. He was associated with some of the most important cases ever heard in this district - cases which created widespread interest. He was a man of strong individuality and unflinching courage, and, holding his views, he would always maintain them in face of any opposition. Withal he was of a most genial, kindly, and generous disposition, and, however one might differ from him, one could always do justice to his strong character and exceptional intelligence... None could know him intimately without liking him, and admiring him for his kindness, for his energy, for his determination and pluck. He acquired land in the vicinity of his residence in North Broadway, and in his spare time it was his delight to attend to the cultivation of his allotments, which are now planted as orchards, and in excellent order. On his retirement from court work he devoted himself entirely to his property, and even up till the time of his last seizure and when he was hampered by increasing feebleness, he was never weary of attending personally to the work of cultivation. There are some particulars which it will be interesting for our readers to know. His was the first marriage celebrated in this locality taking place in Old Dunolly, where he then resided, about fifty years ago. In fact, had he lived till the beginning of March next Mr. and Mrs. Phelps would have observed their golden wedding. At that time religious ministrations were not so regular as now, and the clergyman - the Rev. Mr. Cheyne, of the Church of England - drove all the way from Castlemaine to officiate at the wedding, for which Mr. Phelps paid him a fee of fifty pounds. A more painful and pathetic event of those early days took place subsequently, which still further illustrates the long association of Mr. and Mrs. Phelps with Dunolly. The very first internment that took place in what was then the new cemetery here, was that of a little son of Mr. and Mrs. Phelps, who, sad to relate, met his death by drowning in the creek which traverses Mr. Phelps' property at the rear of the house. Deep and general sympathy is felt for the widow in the severing of such a long and affectionate association. She must feel the bereavement sadly. Mr. and Mrs. Phelps brought up a large family here, of whom ten are now living, some settled well at a distance, others residing still in Dunolly. The family consists of two sons and eight daughters - Messrs Robert and Edward, and Misses Harriet, Catherine, Effie, and Amy, and Mrs Manning, Mrs Rouse, Mrs Bernstein and Mrs Sharman. It can safely be said that no family in the district has ever enjoyed greater respect and regard than that of Mr. and Mrs. Phelps. Assuredly the members of it are a credit to their parents, to the district, and to Victoria, and are looked up to and esteemed by the entire community. Mrs. Phelps and family have the sympathy of the people. Both sons reside in New South Wales, and were unable to reach Dunolly in time for the funeral. Mr. Robert Valentine Phelps, solicitor, the deceased, was born in Ledbury, Herefordshire, England, and was a son of the late Mr. Robert Phelps, solicitor, of Tewkesbury, England. He was admitted as a solicitor, at Westminister on the 9th May, 1842. He left England, and landed in Wellington New Zealand, in 1846, where he resided for some years, arriving in Dunolly, as stated, in 1851. He was admitted to the Victorian bar in 1856 - the year the rush broke out at Dunolly - and thereafter practiced his profession steadily, and with success - being engaged in some great cases - until the infirmities of age gradually creeping over him compelled retirement from active practice some eight years ago. The funeral took place yesterday afternoon, a large number being present to pay the last token of respect to such an old and respected resident. The coffin was covered with wreaths and crosses, sent by loving friends, and the family also received a very large number of telegrams, letters, and other tokens of sympathy. The pall bearers were - Cr Woodham (Mayor), Rev. W.J. Chambers, ex-Sergeant Coyne, and Messrs Skelton, O'Grady, and H.J. Nolan. The Rev. W. Puttock (St. John's Church) conducted the service at the grave.

[5516]

There is a memorial for Louisa at Dunnolly,Victoria, Australia.

@1 [6649] [S44]

Enoch King / Rhoda Phillips

Husband: Enoch King
Born: 22 Jan 1770at: Ashfield, Franklin, Massachusetts, United States
Married: 31 Aug 1788at: Ashfield, Franklin, Massachusetts, United States
Died: at:
Father: John King
Mother: Mary
Sources: [6066]
Wife: Rhoda Phillips
Born: ABT 1772at: Shaftsbury, Bennington, Vermont, United States
Died: at: Yarmouth
Father: Thomas Phillips
Mother: Elizabeth Noyes
Sources: [6067]
Children
Name: Thomas Jefferson King [10449] [10450]
Born: 27 May 1806at: Ashfield, Franklin, Massachusetts, United States
Married: at:  
Died: 23 Sep 1876at: East Layton, Davis, Utah, USA
Spouses: Rebecca Englesby Olin

Name: Betsey King [6068]
Born: ABT 1797at: Ashfield, Franklin, Massachusetts, United States
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Racheal King [6069]
Born: ABT 1799at: Ashfield, Franklin, Massachusetts, United States
Died: 1801at:
Spouses:

Name: Lucy King [6070]
Born: ABT 1789at: Ashfield, Franklin, Massachusetts, United States
Died: INFANTat:
Spouses:

Name: Lydia King [6071]
Born: ABT 1790at: Ashfield, Franklin, Massachusetts, United States
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Electa King [6072]
Born: ABT 1791at: Ashfield, Franklin, Massachusetts, United States
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Otis King [6073]
Born: 15 Mar 1793at: Ashfield, Franklin, Massachusetts, United States
Died: 20 Mar 1863at:
Spouses:

Name: Moses King [6074]
Born: ABT 1795at: Ashfield, Franklin, Massachusetts, United States
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Polly or Mary King [6075]
Born: 18 Dec 1799at: Ashfield, Franklin, Massachusetts, United States
Died: 28 Oct 1865at: Hiram, Ohio
Spouses:

Name: Dorcas King [10740]
Born: 23 May 1804at: Ashfield, Franklin, Massachusetts, United States
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Enoch King [6076]
Born: ABT 1807at: Ashfield, Franklin, Massachusetts, United States
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: John King [6077]
Born: ABT 1810at: Ashfield, Franklin, Massachusetts, United States
Died: 28 Feb 1877at:
Spouses:

Name: Rhoda King [6078]
Born: ABT 1812at: Ashfield, Franklin, Massachusetts, United States
Died: at:
Spouses:


Pedigree Chart for: Enoch King

      /--
   /--John  King 
   |  \--
/--John  King 
|  |  /--David  Stowell 
|  \--Mary  Stowell 
|     \--Mary  Stedman 
|--Enoch  King 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Mary   
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Rhoda Phillips

      /--
   /--Thomas  Phillips 
   |  \--
/--Thomas  Phillips 
|  |  /--
|  \--Catherine  Liscomb 
|     \--
|--Rhoda  Phillips 
|     /--
|  /--Joseph  Noyes 
|  |  \--
\--Elizabeth  Noyes 
   |  /--
   \--Elizabeth  Short 
      \--

[10449]

Source for this page is George Reynold Watkins 1142 East 2700 South Salt Lake City, Utah 84106. He lists sources: Autobiograpy of Thomas Franklin King, Pg 989 in the Book titled, "Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah," and the "LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, pg 81. Gravestones in the Kaysville-Layton Cemetery. Family Record of Thomas E. King in possession of George E. King, Garland, Utah. Thomas Jefferson King had a second wife, Pauline Hutchings, married and sealed 7 Apr 1869, Salt Lake City, SL., Utah. She was born 14 Sep 1840, Hancock Co., Illinois.

@1 [6066] [S44]

@1 [6067] [S44]

@1 [10450] [S44]

@1 [6068] [S44]

@1 [6069] [S44]

@1 [6070] [S44]

@1 [6071] [S44]

@1 [6072] [S44]

@1 [6073] [S44]

@1 [6074] [S44]

@1 [6075] [S44]

@1 [10740] [S44]

@1 [6076] [S44]

@1 [6077] [S44]

@1 [6078] [S44]

Isaac Harness / Elizabeth Wiley

Husband: Isaac Harness
Born: at:
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Wife: Elizabeth Wiley
Born: at:
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Children
Name: Adaline Harness [7584]
Born: 22 Nov 1840[7584] at:
Married: at:  
Died: 17 Dec 1928at: Lexington, McLean, Illinois, United States
Spouses: Benjamin Franklin Claggett


Pedigree Chart for: Isaac Harness

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Isaac  Harness 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Elizabeth Wiley

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Elizabeth  Wiley 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

@1 [7584] [S9]

  • @2Page: Enumeration Dist 111, entry 235; Film 1254230

Robert Latimer / (--?--)

Husband: Robert Latimer
Born: 26 Feb 1731at: Montville, New London, Connecticut, United States
Married: 1755at: (His 1st Marr.)
Died: at:
Father: Jonathan Latimer Sr.
Mother: Barodel (Borrodil) Denison
Wife: (--?--)
Children

Pedigree Chart for: Robert Latimer

      /--
   /--Robert  Latimer  III
   |  \--
/--Jonathan  Latimer  Sr.
|  |  /--
|  \--Elizabeth  Dimond 
|     \--
|--Robert  Latimer 
|     /--
|  /--George  Denison 
|  |  \--
\--Barodel (Borrodil)  Denison 
   |  /--
   \--Mary Brewster  Wetherell 
      \--Grace  Brewster 

Anthony Welles / Joane Phelps

Husband: Anthony Welles
Born: BEF 1586at: of Chaceley, Worchester, England
Married: 18 Feb 1607at: Chaceley, Worchester, England
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Wife: Joane Phelps
Born: 1589at: Chaceley, Gloucestershire, England
Died: at:
Father: William Phelps
Mother: Elizabeth Holford
Children

Pedigree Chart for: Anthony Welles

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Anthony  Welles 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Joane Phelps

      /--Robert  Phelps 
   /--Florisse  Phelps 
   |  \--Alice   
/--William  Phelps 
|  |  /--
|  \--Johane   
|     \--
|--Joane  Phelps 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Elizabeth  Holford 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

@1 [14677] [S542]

  • @4Data:
    Anthonye Welles m. Joane Phelpes d. William Phelpes

Robert Cammack / Elizabeth Chew

Husband: Robert Cammack
Born: at:
Married: at:  
Died: 1861at:
Father:
Mother:
Wife: Elizabeth Chew
Born: ABT 1782at: Spotsylvania, Virginia, United States
Died: 1838at:
Father: John Chew Col.
Mother: Ann Fox
Children

Pedigree Chart for: Robert Cammack

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Robert  Cammack 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Elizabeth Chew

      /--Larkin  Chew 
   /--John  Chew 
   |  \--Hannah  Roy 
/--John  Chew  Col.
|  |  /--
|  \--Margaret  Beverley 
|     \--
|--Elizabeth  Chew 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Ann  Fox 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

John Fendall Bell / Jane Adie

[14745]
Husband: John Fendall Bell
Born: ABT 1802at: Fluvanna County, Virginia, USA
Married: ABT 1831at:
Died: ABT 1847at: Stafford County, Virginia, USA
Father: Ashley Bell
Mother: Susannah Southerland
Notes: [12222]
Wife: Jane Adie
Born: ABT 1801at: Stafford County, Virginia, USA
Died: at: Stafford County, Virginia, USA
Father: William Adie
Mother: Susan
Notes: [12223]
Children
Name: Sally Fendall Bell [12168]
Born: 30 Mar 1831at: Stafford County, Virginia, USA
Married: at:  
Died: 3 May 1917at: Fairfax County
Spouses: Henry Milstead

Name: Elizabeth F. Bell [12225]
Born: at:
Died: ABT 19 Nov 1850at:
Spouses:

Name: Virginia A. Bell [12226]
Born: ABT 1833at:
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Maria T. Bell [12227]
Born: ABT 1834at:
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: George H. Bell [12228]
Born: ABT 1838at:
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Benjamin A. Bell [12229]
Born: ABT 1840at:
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: John F. Bell [12230]
Born: ABT 1843at:
Died: at:
Spouses:


Pedigree Chart for: John Fendall Bell

      /--George  Bell 
   /--George  Bell 
   |  \--Rebecca  Moore 
/--Ashley  Bell 
|  |  /--Ashley  Johnson 
|  \--Cisley  Johnson 
|     \--Martha  Wooday 
|--John Fendall  Bell 
|     /--Joseph  Southerland 
|  /--Joseph  Southerland 
|  |  \--Elizabeth?  Chiles 
\--Susannah  Southerland 
   |  /--Joseph  Southerland 
   \--Grissell  Mallory 
      \--Lucinda  Pines 

Pedigree Chart for: Jane Adie

      /--
   /--William  Adie 
   |  \--
/--William  Adie 
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Jane  Adie 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Susan   
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

[14745]

Implied Marriages of Fairfax by Hiatt and Scott.

[12222]

Winston of Virginia and Allied Families, Whittet and Shepperson,Richmond, VA, 1927, compiled and edited by Clayton Torrence, p. 401-2:"In 1802 John M. Southerland, of Dinwiddie County, conveyed, for naturallove and affection, to John Fendall Bell, son of Susannah Bell (and allthe rest of her children), of Louisa County, a negro girl named Kitty.Witnesses to this conveyance were Joseph Southerland and GrizzelSoutherland." John M. Southerland was his uncle, brother of his mother.Joseph and Grizzel Southerland were his grandparents, parents to hismother Susannah Bell. Implied Marriages of Fairfax by Hiatt and Scott. Born in Fluvanna County by daughter's death certificate, lived in Stafford County. Called John F. Bell, assume it was Fendall. 1830 US Census for Stafford County: John Bell had 3 men 20-30, 2 girls 0-5, 2 women 20-30, 1 woman 50-60, and 11 slaves. 1850 US Census for Stafford County: John Bell apparently dead, Jane Bell (49) with Virginia T. Bell (17), Maria T. Bell (16), George H. Bell (12),Benjamin A. Bell (10), John T. (F?) Bell (7), and William Adie (46), whowas farmer who ran house. Stafford County Deeds etc. Book MM-412: Bought 1/5 of William Adie estateleft to William's daughter Elizabeth Adie Catoe for $275.00. 18 January1842 Stafford County Deeds etc. Book NN-6: Bought 1/5 of William Adie estateleft to William's son William for $300.00. Susan, William's wife, now deceased too. 9 August 1842 Stafford County Deeds etc. Book NN-133: On 3 May 1842, John F. Bellpaid $500.00 to William Adie for slaves Dennis Green, about 50, MarySteward, about 20, her son Charles, about 2. It included the lifetimeuse of Elias Fox, about 18, which William got from his brother, John H. Adie, deceased. Stafford County Deeds etc. Book 00-352: gave slaves to all his children. George Hugh got Robert about 7 years, son of Matilda; Elizabeth F. got Mary about four years, daughter of Matilda; Sally F. got Harriet about two years, daughter of Matilda; Maria T. got Rosa, an infant, daughter of Matilda; Benjamin A. got Charles about seven, mulatto son of Mary (see NN-133above); Jno. F. got Jerry about four, mulatto son of Mary; Virginia A. got Martha about one, negro daughter of Mary. Dated 8 Nov 1847 Stafford County Deeds etc. Book OO-356: 8 Nov 1847 "William Adie beingtaken in execution under a writ of Capias ad Satisfaciendum at the suite of Thomas M. Farrow for twelve dollars and thirty-eight cents with six percent interest thereon for the 20th day of July 1845 till paid & onedollar & forty-eight cents costs". Sold "his whole estate" to John H.Suttle (j.p.?) at auction for $14.50. Suttle then sold to John F. Bellfor a "valuable consideration", thereby getting the estate back. Stafford County Deeds etc. Book OO-375: 15 Dec. 1847 Three fifths of Susan Adie's slaves from husband William went to John F. Bell: one to Jane Bell, one bought from Lloyd C. Catoe and Elizabeth Adie Catoe, and one to Jane Bell brought from William Adie. The remaining two went to legatees of John H. Adie. John F. Bell asked that three of the five authorities divide the slaves into five parts: John Moncure, Valentine Y. Conway, Edward Waller, William H. Fitzhugh, and John N. Folsom. Carol Mitchell (carolmit@uasor.net) 2/14/01

[12223]

Implied Marriages of Fairfax by Hiatt and Scott. See 1850 census, JohnF. Bell has died.

[12168]

References: Smith-Claggett Genealogical Chart Pohick Book p. 298, 11-2 Also called Sally F. Beall (see Henry Milstead.) Marriage license on 24th May, 1849 from Superior Court of the District ofColumbia. Had her in 1850 Prince William Census at 19 years, with Sarah L.Milstead "1/12" year old baby girl in census. Apparently L. was Laura,she began to be called Annie Laura. Implied Marriages of Fairfax by Hiatt and Scott listed Sarah Fendall Bellbecause of death certficate which listed parents as John Bell of Fluvannaand Jane Adie of Stafford. Sarah Fendall Bell was opposed to marriage she told children, only AnnieLaura actually married. All but Annie Laura buried with her at PohickChurch, and Annie Laura lies nearby with John Hammett Claggett. Harmon Ray, reporting on his mother, Dorothy Smith Ray: "Her two great aunts were Bell and Leila Milstead (both old maids) andtheir names were taken for our grandmother and your mother [CharlieMcNett]." Death Certificate May 8, 1917, William P. Caton of Accotink said died11:50 p.m. on May 3 after an illness since April 24, 1917 with "chronicvalvular heart disease." The undertaker was Wheatley of Alexandria.(I believe this is the same Caton who delivered me in Alexandria at home.) Stafford County Deeds etc. Book OO-352: "for and in consideration of thenatural love and affection which I bear to my daughter Sally F. Bell & inconsideration of one Dollar to me in hand paid by the said Sally F. thereceipt whereof is hereby acknowledged I have given and granted & bythese presents do give and grant unto the said Sally F. Bell herExecutors Administrators & assigns a negro girl named Harriet about twoyears old (daughter of the aforesaid Matilda) to have & to hold the saidnegro girl unto her the said Sally F. Bell her Executors Administratorsand assigns forever" Dated 8 Nov 1847

[12225]

Book Stafford County Deeds etc. Book OO-352: Elizabeth F. got Mary aboutfour years, daughter of Matilda in 1847 Book RR-35: Child given guardian of John C. Shelton by husband afterElizabeth's death. Child given Elizabeth F.'s slave -- Mary about 8 or9 -- and goods. Done in Greene (sp?) County, Alabama

[12226]

Book Stafford County Deeds etc. Book OO-352, 1850 US Census under JaneBell

[12227]

Book Stafford County Deeds etc. Book OO-352, 1850 US Census under JaneBell

[12228]

Book Stafford County Deeds etc. Book OO-352, 1850 US Census under JaneBell

[12229]

Book Stafford County Deeds etc. Book OO-352, 1850 US Census under JaneBell

[12230]

Book Stafford County Deeds etc. Book OO-352, 1850 US Census under JaneBell

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