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David Stuart Dodge / Ellen A. Phelps


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David Stuart Dodge / Ellen A. Phelps

Husband: David Stuart Dodge
Born: 22 Sep 1836at: New York City, New York, USA
Married: 20 Jan 1860at:
Died: 1899at:
Father: William Earl Dodge
Mother: Melissa Phelps
Sources: [13032] [13033]
Wife: Ellen A. Phelps
Born: 28 Mar 1838at:
Died: 1880at:
Father: John Jay Phelps
Mother: Rachel Badgeley Phinney
Sources: [1665]
Children
Name: Ellen Ada Phelps Dodge
Born: 28 Feb 1862at: New York City, New York, USA
Married: at:  
Died: 29 Nov 1883at:
Spouses: Anson Green Phelps Dodge

Name: Walter Phelps Dodge [5353] [5354] [5355]
Born: 13 Jun 1869at: Beirut, Syria
Married: at:  
Died: 23 Apr 1931at: Paris, Paris (Département), France
Spouses: Ida Rose Lena Cooke , Ethel Beatrice Adlard Coles , Helen Louise Steck

Name: Francis Dodge
Born: 20 Sep 1871at:
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Guy Dodge
Born: 21 Feb 1873at:
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Clarence Dodge
Born: 26 Jul 1877at:
Died: at:
Spouses:


Pedigree Chart for: David Stuart Dodge

      /--
   /--David Low  Dodge 
   |  \--
/--William Earl  Dodge 
|  |  /--
|  \--Sarah  Cleveland 
|     \--
|--David Stuart  Dodge 
|     /--Thomas  Phelps 
|  /--Anson Green  Phelps 
|  |  \--Dorothy Lamb  Woodbridge 
\--Melissa  Phelps 
   |  /--Thomas  Phelps 
   \--Oliva  Egleston 
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Ellen A. Phelps

      /--David  Phelps 
   /--Alexander  Phelps 
   |  \--Abigail  Griswold 
/--John Jay  Phelps 
|  |  /--Jonathen  Eno 
|  \--Elizabeth  Eno 
|     \--Mary   
|--Ellen A.  Phelps 
|     /--
|  /--G.  Phinney 
|  |  \--
\--Rachel Badgeley  Phinney 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

[5353] DODGE, Walter Phelps, lawyer and author, was born at Beirut, Syria, June 13, 1869, son of David Stuart and Ellen Ada (Phelps) Dodge. His grandfather William Earl Dodge (q.v.) was the founder of the Phelps Dodge Co. (later Phelps Dodge Copper Co.) of New York, and leader in many civic, philanthropic and religious undertakings, among them the Syrian Protestant college at Beirut, of which he was a founder. His father (q.v. for ancestry) was professor of modern languages at the Syrian Protestant college, having the institution largely under his charge from its inception, was for many years president of the board of home missions of the Presbyterian church and was also president of the National Temperance Society and Publication house. Walter Phelps Dodge spent two years studying in Greece and Germany under private tutors and on his return to America entered the class of 1891 at Yale, but left before graduation to continue his studies at St. John's college, Oxford. Later, after some three years of travel mainly in the south of Europe, he took a course in English law and in 1898 was called to the bar by the Middle Temple, London. In 1909 he was admitted to the New York bar. He made specialty of international law, practicing both in London and United States, but much of his time was spent in literary pursuits. His published writings include "Three Greek Tales" (1892), "As the Crow Flies" (1893), "A Strong Man Armed" (1896), "The Sea of Love" (1898), "Piers Gaveston: a Chapter of Early Constitutional History" (1899), "From Squire to Prince" (1901), "That Disdainful Maiden" (1901), "The Real Sir Richard Burton" (1907), "The Crescent Moon" (1910), "King Charles I, a Study" (1912), "The Purple Iris" (1915), "Red Gold and Other Verses" (1915), "Studies of the English Sovereigns" (1918) and "Types" (1929). A biography of his wife, "Ethel Phelps Dodge," was published privately in 1929. He was a fellow of the Royal Geographic Society and a member of the Sons of the Revolution, the Reform and Wellington Clubs of London and the Racquet and Tennis Club of New York city. In religion he was an Episcopal and in politics a Republican. Personally he was a man of high ideals, somewhat aloof in manner, and with firm opinions which he stoutly defended. With these qualities he combined a lively sense of humor and a love for children. His hobby was the collecting the first editions and old coins. For recreation he enjoyed hunting, tennis, golf and above all travel. He was married three times: (1) at Edinburgh, Scotland, July 21, 1888, to Ida, daughter of Alfred Godolphin Cooke, landowner of Manningham Hall, Yorkshire, England, by whom he had three children: Ellen Ada Phelps, who married (1) Gerald Curtis and (2) Capt. William Reynolds Purnell, U.S. Navy; Stuart Phelps, and Audrey Dodge (died in infancy); (2) at Sioux Fall, S. Dak., May 5, 1905, to Ethel Beatrice (Adlard) Coles, daughter of Percy Hamler Adlard, of Staverton Court, Cheltenham, England, by whom he had a daughter, Rosemary, who married Alexander Gregorieff, Jr.; (3) in London, England, Jan. 5, 1910, to Helen Louise, daughter of Edward Milton Steck, of Haverford, Pa.. He died in Paris, France, April 23, 1931.

@1 [13032] [S80]

  • @2Page: p. 1492.

@1 [13033] [S14]

@1 [1665] [S14]

@1 [5354] [S14]

@1 [5355] [S415]

Fergus Earl of Buchan / (--?--)

Husband: Fergus Earl of Buchan
Born: at:
Married: at:  
Died: 1199at:
Father:
Mother:
Wife: (--?--)
Children
Name: Margaret Countess of Buchan
Born: at:
Married: at:  
Died: 1242at:
Spouses: William Comyn Earl of Buchan


Pedigree Chart for: Fergus Earl of Buchan

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Fergus   Earl of Buchan
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Edward Kibbe / Dorothy Phelps

Husband: Edward Kibbe
Born: at:
Married: 30 Nov 1693at: Enfield, Hartford, Connecticut, United States
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Wife: Dorothy Phelps
Born: 10 May 1675[4084] at: Westfield, Hampden, Massachusetts, United States
Died: at:
Father: Jacob Phelps
Mother: Dorothy Ingersoll
Children

Pedigree Chart for: Edward Kibbe

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Edward  Kibbe 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Dorothy Phelps

      /--
   /--George  Phelps 
   |  \--
/--Jacob  Phelps 
|  |  /--Phillip  Randall 
|  \--Frances  Randall 
|     \--Joanna  Fush 
|--Dorothy  Phelps 
|     /--
|  /--John  Inkersall 
|  |  \--
\--Dorothy  Ingersoll 
   |  /--
   \--Dorothy  Lord 
      \--Dorothy  Bird 

@1 [4084] [S80]

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Richard Franklin Winslow / Kathleen Louvisa Phelps

Husband: Richard Franklin Winslow
Born: 15 Jun 1898at:
Married: 20 Sep 1929at: Little Falls, New York, USA
Died: Jun 1978at: Town of Wilton, Saratoga Co. Ny.
Father:
Mother:
Wife: Kathleen Louvisa Phelps
Born: 8 May 1911at: Queensbury, Warren, New York, United States
Died: at:
Father: Franklin Mortimer Phelps
Mother: Estella Mary Ramsey
Children

Pedigree Chart for: Richard Franklin Winslow

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Richard Franklin  Winslow 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Kathleen Louvisa Phelps

      /--Norman  Phelps  Jr.
   /--Andrew James  Phelps 
   |  \--Minerva  Burdick 
/--Franklin Mortimer  Phelps 
|  |  /--
|  \--Survilla  West 
|     \--
|--Kathleen Louvisa  Phelps 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Estella Mary  Ramsey 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

William 'Bill' Butler / Elizabeth Rickard

Husband: William 'Bill' Butler
Born: 15 Dec 1797[11017] [11018] [11019] [11020] [11021] [11022] at: Adair County, Kentucky, USA
Married: 18 Dec 1832at: Sangamon County, Illinois, USA
Died: 11 Jan 1876[11023] [11024] [11025] at: Springfield, Sangamon, Illinois, United States
Father:
Mother:
Notes: [11027]
Sources: [11017] [11018] [11019] [11020] [11021] [11022] [11023] [11024] [11025] [11026] [11028] [11029] [11030] [11031] [11032] [11033] [11034] [11035] [11036]
Wife: Elizabeth Rickard
Born: 1 Apr 1809[10830] [10831] at: Fouguier City, Virginia, USA
Died: 2 Mar 1869at: Springfield, Sangamon, Illinois, United States
Father:
Mother:
Notes: [10832]
Sources: [10830] [10831] [10833] [10834] [10835] [10836] [10837]
Children
Name: Salome Elizabeth Butler [5942] [5939] [5940] [5941] [5943] [5944] [5945] [5946] [5947] [5948]
Born: 21 Feb 1835[5939] [5940] at: Springfield, Sangamon, Illinois, United States
Died: 5 Sep 1909[5941] at: Springfield, Sangamon, Illinois, United States
Spouses:

Name: Speed Butler Col. [6045] [6041] [6042] [6043] [6044] [6046] [6047] [6048] [6049] [6050] [6051] [6052] [6053]
Born: 7 Aug 1837[6041] [6042] [6043] at: Springfield, Sangamon, Illinois, United States
Married: at:  
Died: 8 Apr 1885[6044] at: Springfield, Sangamon, Illinois, United States
Spouses: Jeanie Mckenzie Arnold

Name: Henry Wirt Butler [11045] [11038] [11039] [11040] [11041] [11042] [11043] [11044] [11046] [11047] [11048] [11049] [11050] [11051] [11052] [11053] [11054] [11055] [11056] [11057]
Born: 11 Feb 1840[11038] [11039] [11040] [11041] [11042] at: Springfield, Sangamon, Illinois, United States
Married: at:  
Died: 30 May 1915[11043] [11044] at: Springfield, Sangamon, Illinois, United States
Spouses: Helen Chase McClernand


Pedigree Chart for: William 'Bill' Butler

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--William 'Bill'  Butler 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Elizabeth Rickard

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Elizabeth  Rickard 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

[11027] Searched WFT vols. 1-18 & 20-57 no hits. Direct hit on WFT Vol 19(Rickard Side) Searched Pres, F&P, US Soliders, Mayflower Descendants,Mayflower Genealogies, Illinois Marriages, KY Genealogies vol 1, no hits. William Butler was a Lawyer, Horse Trader, & Real Estate Developer. In 1828, he moved to Sangamon County, IL. He campaigned in that year for Zachary Taylor. In 1850, he was Sangamon County Whig Chairman and a delegate to the State Whig Convention. on May 25, 1859, he joined the Old Settlers' Convention. William Butler is one of the most noted politicians from Illinois State's earliest beginnings. He was born in Adair county, Kentucky. During the War of 1812, young William was selected to carry important dispatches from the Governor of Kentucky to an awaiting Commanding General William Henry Harrison. Despite the fact he was all of fifteen years old young William traveled by horseback, and made the trip successfully. Later, as a young man, he was employed in the iron works of Tennessee, and after that was deputy of the Circuit Clerk for Adair County. While thus engaged, he made the acquaintance of a young lawyer and afterward the venerable Judge Stephen T. Logan. The friendship thus formed and lasted through out their life. Butler spent a portion of his time as clerk on a steamboat. In 1828, he came to Sangamon County, Illinois, and purchased a farm in Island Grove. His father, Elkanah, moved with his son and spent his remaining days on that farm. Soon William moved his residence from Island Grove to Springfield, and was appointed Clerk of the Circuit Court, by his before mentioned friend Judge Logan. Butler held that position from March 19, 1836 to March 22,1841, when he resigned. In 1859, Governor Bissell appointed William Butler State Treasurer, in order to fill the vacancy left by prior State Treasure Miller. Butler went on to be re-elected in 1860, and was defeated in 1862. William Butler and Elizabeth Rickard were married on December 18,1832. They had three children - Salome, Speed and Henry Wirt. In his personal appearance, William Butler was more than average height; not heavy, but compactly built. His step was light and wary and his movements very active. Butler possessed great strength and powerful endurance for someone of his weight. He had a high and ample forehead, a thoughtful and serene brow, a bright searching eye, a mouth of inflexible decision, a serious face, and a general aspect of features, which marked him as a man of purpose and resolution. In both business and social intercourse, Butler had a fine presence and his manner showed the individuality of his character. He was a man of habitual self-respectand self-possession. Whether in ordinary walk of life or in great emergencies, Butler made for a noted man. He was endowed with great mental and physical courage; prompt in forming, and resolute in carrying out any purpose or plan of action on which he had decided. William Butler never sought to be conspicuous, hated shams and despised hypocrisy. He never pretended to be something he was not; never at all credulous, but rather inclined to be distrustful of human nature, yet when anyone who had once gained his respect and confidence, he was to them a true, faithful and a steadfast friend. Butler was always relied on in the hour of peril and/or adversity. From 1840 to 1870, the most exciting and perilous years of the Nation, William Butler was one of the most active and influential men in the State of Illinois. A Whig up to the dissolution of that party, Butler help to found the National Republican Party, and would stay as amember for rest of his life. His advice was always sought and usually acted on by the leading men of the State. William Butler never sought office. The public positions, which he held, were tendered to him without solicitation on his part. Butler much preferred to use his influence to decide who should and should not be placed in office, and his potent aid was usually decisive of the result. A more honest custodian of the public funds never held the position of State Treasurer. During the rebellion, his official position gave him grand opportunities for serving his state and nation. He, in connection with the Hon. Jesse K. Dubois & O.M. Hatch, formed the cabinet of Governor Richard Yates. From early on, Mr. Butler discerned the great possibilities that belonged to young Abraham Lincoln. When Lincoln was a poor and comparatively friendless man, it was William Butler who gave him a home and a place in his family. Shortly after Lincoln moved to Springfield, Butler took him in and Lincoln remained a member of the household until the day of his marriage. It was during this time that Lincoln and Butler got mixed up in a duel challenge with General James Shields. Butler was set to defend the honor of Mr. Lincoln, when Lincoln himself interceded and stopped the shoot out. The highlight of the Lincoln/Butler friendship came at the 1860 Republican National Convention, when with the help of David Davis, O.H. Browning, and Stephen T. Logan, Lincoln was nominated for President. William Butler's greatest contribution to public service came in 1861, with the donation of land to what is now know as Camp Butler National Cemetery. Camp Butler was first used to train new recruits for the Union Army during the Civil War. It was then converted into a prison camp for captured confederate soldiers. Today, Camp Butler serves as a national memorial where Illinois Veterans from almost every American military conflict have been laid to rest. It is an inspiration to the citizens of Illinois, a tribute to William Butler and monument to those who have sacrificed their lives in defense of this nation. After a long and lustrous life, William Butler died of pneumonia on January 11, 1876. He is buried at Oak Ridge Cemetery, in Springfield, Illinois. Sketch by Dennis Kemper William Butler, the husband of Peter Rickard's second child Elizabeth,was the Sangamon Co. Clerk and was prominent in the removal of the state capital from Vandalia to Springfield. When Abraham Lincoln rode into Springfield in 1837, Butler took an early interest in him and invited him to take his meals at his home with no mention of board bills. Lincoln boarded at the Butler home for several years and became warmly attached to the family. Lincoln courted Elizabeth's younger sister, Sarah Rickard, who lived in the Butler home. Butler also signed a note for Lincoln to get a bank loan. In the summer of 1842, several satirical letters signed "Rebecca" appeared in the Sagamo Journal, written by MARY TODD and her friend Julia Jayne. The object of the ridicule was the Democratic State Auditor, James Shields, a friend of STEPHEN DOUGLAS. Lincoln added fuel to the fire by writing a letter to the editor mixing nonsense and accusations against Shields. Shields threw a challenge to Lincoln who took responsibility for all the letters. Bill Butler and Elias Merryman were Lincoln's seconds. Charges and counter charges followed and Shields then challenged Butler. Butler accepted and proposed fighting the next morning at 100 yards with rifles. Shields said no because of the law and neither duel took place. Lincoln dressed for his marriage to Mary Todd in November 1842, in the Butler home. While dressing for the wedding, the Butler's little boy, Speed, seeing Lincoln so attired asked him where he was going, to which Lincoln replied, "To hell, I suppose". Later, the issue of the division of Sangamon County involved an unpleasant exchange of letters between Butler and Lincoln. Butler was a man of mercurial temperament, and when he thought Lincoln had done him an injustice in drawing the county line he sent some torrid letters to Lincoln and Edward (Ned) Baker. He hinted corruption was the cause. Lincoln's reply was eloquent and concluded, "I only say now, that I am willing to pledge myself in black and white to cut my own throat from ear to ear, if, when I meet you, you shall seriously say, that you believe me capable of betraying my friends for any price. Your friend in spite of your ill-humor, Lincoln". Butler soon got over his "ill humor" and offered to send Lincoln a horse to bring him back to Springfield after the session. On December 6, 1854, Lincoln wrote Justice McLean recommending Butler be appointed Clerk for the Circuit and District Courts of Illinois. William served as the Illinois State Treasurer from 1859 to 1862. He was a Whig and one of the organizers of the National Republican Party. Butler amassed a fortune as a cotton speculator and real estate investor. Diring the Civil War there was a "textile famine" in the North. Butler and Thomas L. Casey turned up at Alexandria on the Red River with cotton trading permits in the President's handwriting. What little cotton they did collect was taken away from them by the Army and put to military use. But their appearance at the Red River Louisianna camp with Presidential permits "set many tongues going". "Much odium was excited by the circumstances" wrote HORACE GREELEY. "Reflections more or less severe were cast upon the President", wrote Nicolay and Hay.

[10832] Searched WFT vols. 1-12, no hits. Direct hit on WFT Vol. 12 # 2112.Searched CAG no hits. Searched Pres & F&P no hits. Direct WFT hit vol.19 #1417

[5942] Searched WFT Vols 23-57, no hits.

[6045] May have graduated from LCS in 1854. Searched WFT vols. 1-57. no hits. Speed Butler graduated from the Lutheran University, at Springfieldin 1854. He then studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1860. Uponthe out break of the civil war in 1861, he was selected by Governor Yatesto carry a dispatch to Washington D.C., asking for an order to remove theUnited States arms from the arsenal at St. Louis to Alton, Illinois.Railroad and telegraph communication to the capital had been cut off, buthe made his way successfully to the capital, performed his mission andreturned in safety. The arms were removed just in time to save them fromfalling into the hands of the Southern Army. Soon after completing thisservice, Butler was appointed a commissary with the rank of Captain, butwas soon after assigned to duty on the staff of General Pope. It waswith Pope during his campaign through Northern Missouri, at Island #10and other points. In September, 1861, he was appointed Major of the 5thIllinois Cavalry. In June 1862 he was promoted to Colonel in the regulararmy for gallantry on the battlefield of Farmington, Mississippi, but bypermission of General Wool, still remained on the staff of General Pope.He remained with Pope during the Virginia campaign, and also in Minnesotaagainst Sioux Indians. Colonel Butler was honorably discharged after theclose of the war. The order of promotions is as follows: Enlisted on 9/1/1861 as a Major.On 6/30/1862 he was promoted Colonel and commissioned into US Volunteersas an Aide-De-Camp. On 7/8/1862 he was commissioned into Field & StaffIL 5th Cavalry. He was Mustered Out on 7/12/1862. He Resigned on 8/22/1864. The dates seem odd due to the complexity ofhis transfer to General Pope's staff. Speed was described in his wife's widow pension application "as man ofdark complexion, black eyes & black hair." Speed received an appointment to West Point in1852, but it appears thathe never attended.

[11045] ~Searched WFT vols. 1-57, no hits. Searched CAG no hits. Searched Pres &F&P no hits. Searched Kentucky Genealogies #1, Colonial Direct Genealogies #1, Mayflower Genealogies #1, and Mayflower Descendants, no hits.

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    List members of the BAR.

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John Samborn / Mehetabel Fifield

Husband: John Samborn
Born: 6 Nov 1681at: Straham, Rockingham, New Hampshire, USA
Married: ABT 1701at:
Died: 4 Jan 1731at:
Father: John Samborne
Mother: Judith Coffin
Wife: Mehetabel Fifield
Born: at:
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Children

Pedigree Chart for: John Samborn

      /--Richard  Samborne 
   /--John  Samborne 
   |  \--Anne  Bachiler 
/--John  Samborne 
|  |  /--
|  \--Margaret Page  Moulton 
|     \--
|--John  Samborn 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Judith  Coffin 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Mehetabel Fifield

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Mehetabel  Fifield 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

(--?--) / (--?--)

Husband: (--?--)
Wife: (--?--)
Children
Name: Catharina Elisabeth Feilbach [8647] [8648] [8649] [8650]
Born: ABT 1745[8647] [8648] at: Niedertiefenbach Unterlahnkreis, Hesse-Nassau, Prussia, Germany
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Spouses: Johann Adam Brömser

Name: Eleonora Margaretha Feilbach [8750] [8751] [8752] [8753]
Born: ABT 1760[8750] [8751] at: Spriestersbacher Hof
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Spouses: Johann Daniel Brömser


@1 [8647] [S230]

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@1 [8750] [S230]

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    Importdatum: 28 Sep 2001

@1 [8751] [S231]

  • @4Data:
    Importdatum: 28 Sep 2001

@1 [8752] [S230]

  • @4Data:
    Importdatum: 28 Sep 2001

@1 [8753] [S231]

  • @4Data:
    Importdatum: 28 Sep 2001

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