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William Wines Phelps / Harriet Schrider

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William Wines Phelps / Harriet Schrider

Husband: William Wines Phelps
Born: 17 Feb 1792[1440] at: Hanover, Morris, New Jersey, USA
Married: at:  
Died: 7 Mar 1872at: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
Father: Enon Phelps
Mother: Mehitable Goldsmith
Notes: [1441]
Sources: [1440] [1442]
Wife: Harriet Schrider
Born: at:
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Children

Pedigree Chart for: William Wines Phelps

      /--Noah  Phelps 
   /--Elijah  Phelps 
   |  \--Marie Anna  Dyer 
/--Enon  Phelps 
|  |  /--John  Wilcox 
|  \--Jemima  Wilcox 
|     \--Mary  Warner 
|--William Wines  Phelps 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Mehitable  Goldsmith 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Harriet Schrider

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Harriet  Schrider 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

[1441]

William W. Phelps (1792-1872) was born at Hanover, New Jersey. Well educated, Phelps was an aspirant for the office of lieutenant governor of New York at the time he first learned of Mormonism through reading the Book of Mormon and talking with Sidney Rigdon. He visited Kirtland in 1831, was baptized, and became active in editorial work, establishing the "Evening and Morning Star". One of the Prophet's scribes, he assisted in preparing the first hymnal. Excommunicated in 1839, he returned to fellowship in 1841 and fulfilled a mission to the eastern states. He was implicated in the difficulty surrounding the destruction of the Nauvoo Expositor and was summoned to be tried for treason with Joseph Smith at Carthage. He accompanied the pioneers to Utah, where he became one of the first regents of the University of Deseret and a representative in the Utah legislature. LDS Church Hymns by William W. Phelps include the following: "Gently Raise the Sacred Strain" "Now Let Us Rejoice" "Hosanna Anthem" ("The Spirit of God") "Praise to the Man" "Vade Mecum" From "The Phelps Family of America and Their English Ancestors," by Judge Oliver Seymour Phelps & Andrew T. Servin. (Eagle Publishing Company, Pittsfield, Mass., 1899). JUDGE WILLIAM W. PHELPS, b. Dover, N. J., 7 Feb., 1792, removed with his father and family to Homer, N. Y., in 1800, m. Stella Waterman (now called Sally.) Mr. Phelps had a common school education. When quite young he removed to Ohio, soon returning to Homer, N. Y., where he started a paper called the "Western Courier. " From there he removed to Trurnansburgh, Tompkins Co. N. Y., and started the publication of a paper called the "Lake Light." From there he removed to Canandaigua, Ontario Co., N. Y., where he published a paper in the interest of the Anti-Masons, called the Ontario Phoenix. While he resided there the "Book of Mormon" came before the world. He was infatuated with their new religion, abandoned his paper and removing his family to Ohio, joined the Mormon church, and went to Missouri with the first Mormon missionaries. In the fall he returned for his family, purchased a printing press in Cincinnati, and removed with his family to Independence, Jackson Co., Missouri., then a new Mormon settlement. In the fall of 1833 the Mormons were banished from Jackson Co., removing and settling in Colville Co., Mo. From here they were soon routed and removed to [Nauvoo,] Hancock Co., Ill., where they flourished for some time and built a Temple. In 1843 they were again banished. Their next location was Salt Lake City, after which their history is generally known. Mr. Phelps removed and settled with them in Salt Lake City, where he was quite a prominent man, holding for many years the position of Judge. He died there 6 March, 1872 in his 78th year, leaving a widow, his first wife, Sally Waterman, and several children, His widow, Sally, says there are three children in Salt Lake City, the rest in the states; as to the number of wives he took and as to his children we have no full records. The following is a copy of a letter to Mr. O. S. Phelps from Mrs. Phelps on the death of her husband. This shows how deeply the people are infatuated by their religion: Salt Lake City, 18 Mar., 1872 Dear Friend: I received your kind letter and was glad to hear from you. I have to inform you that Mr. Phelps died the sixth day of March, and will have a part in the first resurrection of Saints and Apostles. Through all his fightings and doing he has died at a good old age. Peace to his memory. His works will follow him. He is with Joseph and Hiram, the Blessed Martyrs, who died for the Testimony of Jesus, who believed in Revelation and Resurrection literally fulfilled. God is our Judge and our (here there are three or four words obliterated) are free Jesus and his Apostles were thought not fit to live on the Earth, and were slain for their religion, but we fear not what man can do unto us knowing that God is on our side. Should like you to come to Salt Lake City and see and hear for yourself. Should like to hear from you often. Accept my best wishes and may Peace attend you and yours, I remain your friend and well-wisher. Sally Phelps Early in life he was a candidate for the office of lieutenant-governor of New York. He was baptized into the Church in June, 1831, and undertook a mission to Jackson County, Missouri, where he located as a printer, and published a monthly paper, "The Evening and Morning Star," the first number of which appeared in June, 1832. While he was attending to his duties at the printing office, on July 20, a mob attacked his house, which contained the printing equipment, and pulled it partly down, seized the printing materials, destroyed many papers, and threw his family and furniture out of doors. Again on July 23, the mob renewed their depredations, and William W. Phelps and others offered themselves as a ransom for the Saints, being willing to be scourged, or to die, if that would appease the anger of the mob. The mob would not accept this sacrifice, however, but continued to utter threats of violence against the whole Church. This persecution culminated in the Saints being driven from their homes in Jackson County, in November, 1833. Mob leaders warned Brother Phelps and others to flee for their lives, or they would be killed. Despite repeated appeals, which Elder Phelps helped to frame, to the governor of Missouri, and to the president of the United States, no protection or redress was ever given them. When the exiled Saints in Clay County were organized into a stake, David Whitmer was chosen president, with William W. Phelps and John Whitmer as counselors. He took a prominent part in all matters pertaining to the welfare of the Saints in Missouri. In the early part of 1835, he and his son Waterman were called to Kirtland, where they made their home with the family of the Prophet Joseph Smith and assisted a committee appointed to compile the "Book of Doctrine and Covenants." About this time, Elder Phelps subscribed $500 toward the erection of the Kirtland Temple. When the Church purchased the Egyptian mummies and papyrus from Michael H. Chandler in 1835, William W. Phelps served as one of the scribes in the translation by Joseph Smith of the "Book of Abraham." o 1823- publisher of Lake Light in Trumansburg, NY by 1828 moved to Canandaigua, NY publishing the anti-Masonic Ontario Phoenix June 6, 1831 o elder Oct 1, 1831 o high priest 1833 o printed the Book of Commandments 1835 o assisted in compiling and printing 1st editioin of the Doctrine & Covenants March 17, 1838 o excommunicated July 22, 1840 o extended hand of fellowship 1846 o left Nauvoo for the west o edited Evening & Morning Star 1832-1833 o authored "Redeemer of Israel" "Come All Ye Sons of Zion" "Earth with Her Ten Thousand Flowers" "O Jesus! the Giver" "The Spirit of God Like a Fire is Burning" "Glorious Things are Sung of Zion" "O God the Eternal Father" See D&C 55, 57:5a, 58:9, 61:2 Scribe during tranlation of Book of Abraham LBE says 2/6/38 rejected by Saints LBE says 3/17/39 excommunicated LBE says early 1841 extended hand of fellowship

@1 [1440] [S39]

  • @2Page: p 650-51
  • @4Data:
    • Date: 25 Mar 2000

@1 [1442] [S6]

Thomas Mallory Reverend / (--?--)

Husband: Thomas Mallory Reverend
Born: at:
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Father: William Mallory Sir
Mother:
Notes: [12484]
Wife: (--?--)
Children
Name: Thomas Mallory Reverend [12482]
Born: at:
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Philip Mallory Reverend [12483]
Born: ABT 1617at:
Died: 1661at:
Spouses:


Pedigree Chart for: Thomas Mallory Reverend

      /--John  Mallory  Sir
   /--William  Mallory  Sir
   |  \--
/--William  Mallory  Sir
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Thomas  Mallory  Reverend
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

[12484]

MCS5: 109-14

[12482]

MCS5: 109-15

[12483]

MCS5: 109-16 Roger was heir, Philip was rector of Charles Parish inYork Co., returned to England Mallorys of Virginia (http://www.rootsweb.com/~pbarker/virginia.htm): Ancestry.com: Search Results Database: English Origins of American Colonists Combined Matches: 4 English Origins of American Colonists, p. English Origins of AMERICANCOLONISTS [p.1] CLUES FROM ENGLISH ARCHIVES CONTRIBUTORY TO AMERICAN GENEALOGY. BY J. HENRY LEA AND J. R. HUTCHINSON. page 12 WILL of PHILIP MALLORY lately resident in Virginia and now in London,clerk, dated 23 July, 1661. To be buried at the discretion of CaptainJohn Whitty, one of my executors. To my nephew Mr Roger (sic) Mallory andhis heirs all my plantations, lands, etc. in Virginia or elsewhere. ToMrs Elizabeth Mallory my mother and to Mr Thomas Mallory my brother 10each. To my nephew Thomas Hawford 10. Towards the erecting of a collegein Virginia 10. Legacies to friends. To my niece Prances Pidgeon tenhead of cattle to be delivered to her or her assigns in Virginia. Theresidue of my estate either in England or Virginia I give to my saidnephew Mr Richard (sic) Mallory. Executors, the said Roger (sic) Malloryand Capt. John Whittie. To my cousin William Mallory 20. Witnesses:War-ham Horsmanden, Benjamin Sheppard, scr. Proved 27 July, 1661, by JohnWhitty one of the executors power being reserved to Roger Mallory.(P.C.C. May 114.) View full context English Origins of American Colonists, p. English Origins of AMERICANCOLONISTS [p.1] CLUES FROM ENGLISH ARCHIVES CONTRIBUTORY TO AMERICAN GENEALOGY. BY J. HENRY LEA AND J. R. HUTCHINSON. page 12 Not in Waters, who, however, names a Philip Mallory of Virginia asmarrying a Catherine Batt (see Virginia Caroloum, in note infra). View full context English Origins of American Colonists, p. English Origins of AMERICANCOLONISTS [p.1] CLUES FROM ENGLISH ARCHIVES CONTRIBUTORY TO AMERICAN GENEALOGY. BY J. HENRY LEA AND J. R. HUTCHINSON. page 13 Rev. Philp Mallory was son of Dr. Thomas Mallory, Archdeacon of Richmond,1603, and Dean of Chester (1607-1644),Neill's Va. Caroloum, p. 238.* andwas born about 1617, being matriculated at Corpus Christi College,Oxford, 28 May, 1634, aged 17 years; he was B.A. from St. Mary's Hall, 26April, 1637, and A.M. 16 Jan., 1639-40; Vicar of Norton, Co. Durham,1641. He married Catherine, daughter of Robert Batt, vice-master ofOxford University. He was in Virginia in 1656, and probably much earlier,in 1657 he was a member of the Assembly, at which he also officiated in1658-9, and at the religious services when Charles II was proclaimed atJamestown, 20 Sept., 1660.Op. cit., p. 283; Tyler's Cradle of theRepublic, pp. 90-91.* In March, 1660-1, he was appointed, "having beeneminently faithful in the ministry," in company with Sir WilliamBerkeley, the Governor, to solicit in England for the church in Virginiaon which mission he evidently died, in spite of the fact that he is saidto have been minister at Elizabeth City in 1644 and 1664 as "Mr.Mallory."Meade's Old Churches and Families of Va., I., 230-31.* The firstof these dates probably refers to the testator, the second certainly tosome one else, as the date and probate of his will prove conclusivelythat he died between July 23d and 27th, 1661, in England, nor could thishave been his brother Thomas, as he had then been presented for fouryears as Prebend of Chester (30 July, 1660),Le Neve's Fasti Eccl, III,27I.* but it may ` [p.13] have been his nephew "mr." Roger Mallory, whois called his son in error by Mr. TylerCradle of the Republic, pp. 90,91.* and who, later (1668), had grant of land from York County "for theuse of Mr. Philip Mallory."Ibid.* This Roger settled in King and QueenCounty and had a son William, who may have been the "cousin WilliamMallory" named in the will. View full context English Origins of American Colonists, p. English Origins of AMERICANCOLONISTS [p.1] CLUES FROM ENGLISH ARCHIVES CONTRIBUTORY TO AMERICAN GENEALOGY. BY J. HENRY LEA AND J. R. HUTCHINSON. page 13 William Batt, brother of Catherine, the wife of Rev. Philip Mallory,entered land on Mobjack Bay, Gloucester Co., as early as 5 Sept.,1643,Virginia Ld. Records, I, p. 901.* and was a member of the Assemblyin 1654 from Surrey. John Batt, elder brother of the above, being son andheir of Robert Bart of Okewell in Bitstall, by his wife Mary, daughter ofMr. John Parry of Hereford, was Captain of Foot in Regmt. of Aybrigg andMorley and J.P. of the West Riding, Yorkshire; he married Martha,daughter of Thomas Mallory, Dean of Chester, and had John (lost in theIrish Sea, coming from Virginia with his father), William, Thomas andHenry {in Virginia 1667), and Martha.Water's Gleanings, I, 105, fromHarl. MS., 4630, p. 26, and Richmond Standard, 4 June, 1881.* View full context Viewing records 1-4

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