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(--?--) / Margaret 'Peggy' Olive Decamp


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(--?--) / Margaret 'Peggy' Olive Decamp

Husband: (--?--)
Wife: Margaret 'Peggy' Olive Decamp
Born: 31 Mar 1919at: Muskegon, Michigan, USA
Died: 23 Dec 1967at: Grand Rapids, Kent, Michigan, USA
Father:
Mother: Caroline 'Carrie' McRae
Children
Name: Ronald Fern Patterson
Born: at:
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Elaine Kay Patterson
Born: at:
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Carol Lee Patterson
Born: at:
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Spouses:


Pedigree Chart for: Margaret 'Peggy' Olive Decamp

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Margaret 'Peggy' Olive  Decamp 
|     /--Alexander  McRae 
|  /--Christopher  McRae 
|  |  \--Caroline Harriet  Rogers 
\--Caroline 'Carrie'  McRae 
   |  /--Alexander  McRae 
   \--
      \--

Robert Bruce I / Isabella (Matilda) de Mar Countess of Mar

Husband: Robert Bruce I
Born: 11 Jul 1274at: Writtle, Near Chelmsford, Essex, England
Married: ABT 1295at:
Died: 7 Jun 1329[2854] [2855] [2856] [2857] at: Cardoss Castle, Firth of Clyde, Scotland
Father: Robert de Brus VI
Mother: Marguerite de Carrick
Notes: [2858]
Sources: [2854] [2855] [2856] [2857] [2859] [2860] [2861] [2862] [2863] [2864] [2865]
Wife: Isabella (Matilda) de Mar Countess of Mar
Born: ABT 1278[1406] at: Mar, Scotland
Died: ABT 1320at:
Father: Donald MacGyloche Sixth Earl of Mar
Mother: Helen of Wales
Sources: [1406] [1407] [1408] [1409]
Children
Name: Margery Bruce Princess of Scotland [2846] [2845] [2847] [2848] [2849]
Born: ABT 1297[2845] at: Dundonald, Kentucky, USAle, Ayrshire, Scotland
Married: at:  
Died: 2 Mar 1316at: Paisley, Strathclyde, Scotland
Spouses: Walter The Steward Lord High Steward of Scotland


Pedigree Chart for: Robert Bruce I

      /--Robert  de Brus 
   /--Robert  de Brus 
   |  \--Isabella  Huntingdon  of Scotland
/--Robert de  Brus  VI
|  |  /--Gilbert de  Clare 
|  \--Isabella  de Clare 
|     \--Isabel  Marshall 
|--Robert  Bruce  I
|     /--Duncan   Earl of Carrick
|  /--Neil   Earl of Carrick
|  |  \--Avelina  FitzWalter 
\--Marguerite de  Carrick 
   |  /--Duncan   Earl of Carrick
   \--Margaret  Stewart 
      \--Beatrix de  Angus 

Pedigree Chart for: Isabella (Matilda) de Mar Countess of Mar

      /--Duncan  MacGyloche  Fourth Earl of Mar
   /--William  MacGyloche  5th Earl of Mar
   |  \--
/--Donald  MacGyloche  Sixth Earl of Mar
|  |  /--William  Comyn  Earl of Buchan
|  \--Elizabeth  Comyn 
|     \--Margaret   Countess of Buchan
|--Isabella (Matilda) de  Mar  Countess of Mar
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Helen   of Wales
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

[2858] Bruce, Robert (1274-1329), liberator, and, as Robert I, king of Scotland (1306-29). He was originally named Robert de Bruce, and to distinguish him from his father and grandfather, who had the same name, he is often referred to as Robert de Bruce VIII. He is also called Robert the Bruce. As Earl of Carrick it was necesary that he pay homage to King Edward I of England, otherwise he could not retain his Earldom and potential ascension to the Scottish throne. In 1296, Bruce defeated King John de Baliol and thereafter refused to acknowledge another King of Scotland. He was originally named Robert de Bruce but he is also called Robert the Bruce. As earl of Carrick he paid homage to King Edward I of England, who, in 1296, defeated King John de Baliol and thereafter refused to acknowledge another king of Scotland. Bruce later abandoned Edward's cause and joined other Scottish leaders in taking up arms for the independence of his country. In 1299, the year after the Scottish patriot Sir William Wallace was defeated by Edward at Falkirk, Bruce (then still in favor with Edward) was made one of the four regents who ruled the kingdom in the name of Baliol. In 1305 he was one of those consulted in the decision to make Scotland a province of England. Bruce proclaimed his right to the throne, and on March 27, 1306, he was crowned king at Scone. Bruce was deposed, however, in 1307 by Edward's army and forced to flee to the highlands and then to the little island of Rathlin on the coast of Antrim (now in Northern Ireland). In his absence all his estates were confiscated, and he and his followers were excommunicated. He continued to recruit followers, however, and in less than two years he wrested nearly all of Scotland from the English. Bruce again defeated the English, with the help of William Wallace, in 1314 in the Battle of Bannockburn, twice invaded England, and in 1323 concluded with King Edward II of England a truce for 13 years. After the accession of King Edward III in 1327, war again broke out, and the Scots won again. In 1328 they secured a treaty recognizing the independence of Scotland and the right of Bruce to the throne. Bruce later abandoned Edward's cause and joined other Scottish leaders in taking up arms for the independence of his country. In 1299, the year after the Scottish patriot Sir William Wallace was defeated by Edward at Falkirk, Bruce, then still in favor with Edward, was made one of the four regents who ruled the kingdom in the name of Baliol. However, it should be pointed out that the Bruce family had no connection with the capture of Wallace. In 1305 he was one of those consulted in the decision to make Scotland a province of England. In 1306 he met an old enemy, the Scottish patriot John Comyn, who was the nephew of Baliol; a quarrel occurred, and Bruce stabbed Comyn in a church in Dumfries. He was immediately excommunicated by the Pope. Bruce's action brought the wrath of King Edward I of England who attempted to capture him. The English were perfectly happy to have Scotland as a colony under a somewhat divisionary rule; the menace of a new King of Scotland could not be tolerated. Bruce proclaimed his right to the throne, and on March 27, 1306, he was crowned king at Scone. Bruce was deposed, however, in 1307 by Edward's army and forced to flee to the highlands and then to the little island of Rathlin on the coast of Antrim (now in Northern Ireland). In his absence all his estates were confiscated, and he and his followers were excommunicated. He continued to recruit followers, however, and in less than two years he wrested nearly all of Scotland from the English. Bruce again defeated the English in 1314 in the Battle of Bannockburn, twice invaded England, and in 1323 concluded with King Edward II of England a truce for 13 years. After the accession of King Edward III in 1327, war again broke out, and the Scots won again. It was not until 1328 that Scottish independence was once more recognised by the English, at this time with Edward III as their king. In 1328 they secured the Treaty of Northampton which recognized the independence of Scotland and the right of Bruce to the throne. This recognition was duly sealed by way of marriage, as was the custom in these days, with Joanna, sister of Edward marrying Robert's son, David. One clause in the Treaty was never honoured though. The Stone of Destiny was not returned to Scone. It is from Robert the Bruce's children that a latter great house was born. He was married twice, his first wife being Isabella and his second being Elizabeth. Isabella provided him with one daughter, Marjorie. Marjorie was to become the founder of the Stewart lineage. Elizabeth provided him with four children; Matilda, David, Margaret and John. Bruce was succeeded by his son, David II. Bruce's nephew, Robert II, who succeeded David, was the first King of the Stuart house of English and Scottish royalty. In his later years Bruce lived in seclusion at Cardross Castle, on the northern shore of the Firth of Clyde, where he died. It is said that upon his death, Robert the Bruce's heart was taken to the Holy Land by Sir James Douglas. Although this loyal knight died fighting the Moors in Spain the heart was returned to Scotland and buried in Melrose. -- Adapted from Camelot Village, Britain's Heritage and History Link

[2846] Marjorie Bruce died in a riding accident. Her son, Robert II Stuart was delivered by caesarian section after his mother's death. Marjorie was through her son to become the founder of the Stewart lineage.

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Henry II Plantagenet King of England / Eleanor of Aquitaine Queen of England

Husband: Henry II Plantagenet King of England
Born: 5 Mar 1133at: Le Mans, Maine, France
Married: 11 May 1152at: Bordeaux, Gironde, France
Died: 6 Jul 1189at: Chinon, Indre-et-Loire, France
Father: Geoffrey IV 'Le Bon' Plantagenet Count d'Anjou
Mother: Matilda (Maud) Empress of Germany
Notes: [2699]
Sources: [2700]
Wife: Eleanor of Aquitaine Queen of England
Born: ABT 1122at: Chcateau de Belin, Bordeaux, Aquitaine
Died: 1 Apr 1204at: Poitiers, Poitou, Aquitaine
Father: Guillaume X Duke of Aquitaine
Mother: Elbeanor de Chatellerault
Notes: [3116]
Sources: [3117]
Children
Name: William Plantagenet Prince of England [2701]
Born: 17 Aug 1152at: Le Mans, France
Died: Apr 1156at: Wallingford Castle, Wallingford, Berkshire, England
Spouses:

Name: Henry Plantagenet King of England [3119]
Born: 28 Feb 1155at: Bermandsey Palace, London, England
Married: at:  
Died: 11 Jun 1183at: Chcateau de Mortel, Turenne, Aquitaine
Spouses: Margaret Capet

Name: Matilda Plantagenet Princess of England [2706]
Born: 1156at: London, England
Married: at:  
Died: 28 Jun 1189at: Brunswick, Germany
Spouses: Heinrich V Duke Saxony

Name: Richard 'The Lion-Hearted' Plantagenet I King of England [3121]
Born: 8 Sep 1157at: Beaumont Palace, Oxford, England
Married: at:  
Died: 6 Apr 1199at: Chaluz, Aquitaine, France
Spouses: Berengaria of Navarre

Name: Geoffrey Plantagenet Duke of Brittany [2707]
Born: 23 Sep 1158at: England
Married: at:  
Died: 19 Aug 1186at: Paris, Paris (Département), France
Spouses: Constance Countess of Bretagne

Name: Philip Plantagenet Prince of England [2702]
Born: ABT 1160at: England
Died: ABT 1160at:
Spouses:

Name: Eleanor Plantagenet Princess of England [2703]
Born: 13 Oct 1162at: Domfront, Normandie
Married: at:  
Died: 25 Oct 1214at: Las Huelgas, Burgos, Burgos, Spain
Spouses: Alfonso VIII King of Castile

Name: Joanna Plantagenet Princess of England
Born: Oct 1165at: Angers, Maine-et-Loire, France
Died: 4 Sep 1199at:
Spouses:

Name: John 'Lackland' Plantagenet King of England [3114] [3115]
Born: 24 Dec 1167at: Beaumont Palace, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England
Married: at:  
Died: 19 Oct 1216at: Newark Castle, Newark, Nottinghamshire, England
Spouses: Isabella de Taillefer Queen of England , Isabel of Gloucester


Pedigree Chart for: Henry II Plantagenet King of England

      /--Foulques IV 'Rechin'   Count d'Anjou
   /--Foulques 'Le Jeuve'   V Count d'Anjou
   |  \--Beatrice De Montfort  D'Evreux 
/--Geoffrey IV 'Le Bon'  Plantagenet  Count d'Anjou
|  |  /--Elias   I Count of Maine
|  \--Ermengarde (Ermentrude) du  Maine 
|     \--Matilda of  Chateau-du-Loir 
|--Henry II  Plantagenet  King of England
|     /--William I 'The Conqueror'   King of England
|  /--Henry  Beauclerc  I King of England
|  |  \--Matilda of Flanders   
\--Matilda (Maud)   Empress of Germany
   |  /--William I 'The Conqueror'   King of England
   \--Eadgyth (Edith) 'Matilda'  Dunkeld  Princess of Scotland
      \--Margaret 'Etheling'   Queen of Scotland

Pedigree Chart for: Eleanor of Aquitaine Queen of England

      /--
   /--Guillaume VII (IX) Duke of  Aquitaine 
   |  \--
/--Guillaume X Duke of  Aquitaine 
|  |  /--
|  \--Philippa (Mathilde or Maude), Countess of  Toulouse 
|     \--
|--Eleanor of  Aquitaine  Queen of England
|     /--
|  /--Aimeri I Viscount of  Chatellerault 
|  |  \--
\--Elbeanor de  Chatellerault 
   |  /--
   \--Dangereuse de L' Isle  Bouchard 
      \--

[2699] BIOGRAPHY: He grew up in Anjou, but visited England as early as 1142 to defend his mother's claim to the disputed throne of Stephen; educated by famous scholars, he had a true love of reading and intellectual discussion. BIOGRAPHY: His father Geoffrey of Anjou died in September 1151, leaving Normandy and Anjou to Henry. Henry's continental possessions more than doubled with his marriage to Eleanor of Aquitane, ex-wife of King Louis VII of France. After a succession agreement between Stephen and Matilda in1153, he was crowned Henry II in October 1154. Eleanor bore Henry five sons and three daughters between 1153 and1167; the relationship between Henry, Eleanor, and their sons Henry, Richard, and John proved to be tumultuous and treacherous. The empire ruled by Henry and his sons was considerably larger than the lone English is land - the French Angev in positions extended from Normandy southward to the Pyrenees, covering the counties of Brittany, Maine, Poitou, Touraine, and Gascony, as well as Anjou, Aquitane, and Normandy. Henry was extremely energetic and traveled quickly and extensively within the borders of his kingdom. BIOGRAPHY: Henry revitalized the English Exchequer, issuing receipts for tax payments and keeping written accounts on rolled parchment. He replaced incompetent sheriffs, expanding the authority of royal courts, which brought more funds into his coffers. A body of common law emerged to replace feudal and county courts, which varied from place to place. Jury trials were initiated to end the old Germanic customary trials by ordeal or battle. Henry's systematic approach to law provided a common basis for development of royal institutions throughout the entire realm. BIOGRAPHY: The process of strengthening the royal courts, however, yielded an unexpected controversy. Church courts, instituted by William the Conqueror, became a safe haven for criminals of varying degree and ability, for one in fifty of the English population qualified as clerics. Henry wished to transfer such cases to the royal courts, as the only punishment open to the Church courts was demotion of the cleric. Thomas Beckett, Henry's close friend and chancellor since 1155, was named Archbishop of Canterbury in June 1162. In an attempt to discredit claims that he was too closely tied to the king, he vehemently opposed the weakening of Church courts. Henry drove Beckett into exile from 1164-1170, when the Archbishop returned to England and greatly angered Henry over opposition to the coronation of Prince Henry. BIOGRAPHY: Exasperated, Henry publicly announced a half-hearted desire to be rid off Beckett -- four ambitious knights took the king at his word and murdered Beckett in his own cathedral on December 29, 1170. Henry is perhaps best remembered for Beckett's murder, but in fact, the realm was better off without the contentious Archbishop. Henry endured a rather limited storm of protest over the incident, but the real threat to his power came from within his own family. Henry's sons - Henry the Young King, Richard, Geoffrey, and John - were never satisfied with any of their father's plans for dividing his lands and titles upon his death. The sons, at the encouragement (and sometimes because of the treatment) of their mother, rebelled against the king several times. Prince Henry, the only man ever to be crowned while his father still lived, wanted more than a royal title. Thus from 1193 to the end of his reign Henry was plagued by his rebellious sons, who always found a willing partner in Louis VII of France. BIOGRAPHY: Henry succeeded King Stephen in October 1154, apparently after surviving a poisoning attempt by Stephen's supporters. He ruled his Empire of Britain, Normandy, Anjou, Maine, Poitou and Aquitaine with an iron rod and was the first king of England to add Ireland to his domains. With his fiery red hair and equally fiery nature, probably inherited from his mother, the Empress, Henry proved a king to be reckoned with and for 35 years he dominated Western Christendom as the most influential monarch of the day. His masterfulness was seriously challenged by the Thomas a Becket murder.The death of Henry the Young King in1183, and that of Geoffrey in 1186, gave no respite from his children's rebellion - Richard, with the assistance of Louis VII, attacked and defeated Henry, forcing him to accept a humiliating peace on July 4, 1189. Henry II died two days later, on July 6, 1189.

[3116] Duchess Eleanor of Aquitaine was an intelligent and emancipated woman living in the dark middle ages. Although it is a conventional rule that all ladies of high rank should be described as beautiful, all sources agree that Eleanor of Aquitaine really was beautiful. In addition, she was the richest heiress of France and became successively Queen of France and England. Eleanor was a granddaughter of William IX of Aquitaine (1070-1127), who was one of the first and most famous troubadours. He was a cheerful man and an ardent lover of women, who joined the First Crusade. Later he "abducted" the wife of the viscount of Châtellerault, Dangereuse, and although he could not marry her, Dangereuse managed to have her daughter Aenor married to his eldest son William X (1099-1137) in 1121. They had two daughters, Eleanor and Petronilla, and a son, William Aigret. Eleanor resembled both William IX and Dangereuse; she possessed the same intelligence, gaiety, restlessness and will power. The court of William IX was the centre of western European culture: the ducal family was entertained by jongleurs, storytellers and troubadours. Unlike most of her contemporaries, male and especially female, Eleanor was carefully educated and she was an excellent student. Eleanor's happy childhood ended with the subsequent deaths of her mother, her little brother and - in 1137 - her father. The orphaned Eleanor was the richest heiress in France thus a marriage was arranged for her to its King, Louis VII (1121-1180). Louis had been brought up for an office in the church, but he had become heir to the French throne after the death of his elder brother. He was a weak, dull, grave and pious man and he and the lively Eleanor were ill matched. Louis never understood his young wife, but he appears to have adored her with a passionate admiration. It wasn't until 1145 that a daughter, Marie, was born. Meanwhile, Eleanor was eager to govern her own duchy, since she knew the troublesome Aquitainians better than anyone. However, Louis' councillor, the Abbot Sugar, resented her influence in governmental matters. When Louis went on the Second Crusade to Palestine, Eleanor raised a company of women to join her and thus she accompanied her husband to the Holy Land. In Antioch Eleanor was warmly received by her uncle Raymond, who reminded her of her happy childhood in Poitiers. Eleanor and Raymond were of the opinion that Jerusalem could best be secured by driving back the Turks in the north, but Louis VII rejected the plan and a quarrel followed. Quietly Louis began preparations for his departure and after dark Eleanor was forcibly conducted from Antioch. Soon the crusade became a complete failure and even Louis' brother Robert quickly rushed home. On their way back to France, Louis and Eleanor visited the pope to plead for a divorce. Instead, the pope tried to reconcile them and induced them to sleep in the same bed again. Back in France their marriage was worse than ever and Eleanor was horrified to realise that she was pregnant. After the birth of a second daughter in 1150 and the death of Louis' chief minister, Eleanor was no longer the only one who wanted a divorce. She finally got it in 1152. She was still the richest heiress of France and on her way from Paris to Poitiers she had to outwit two would-be seducers. By then Eleanor had fallen in love with duke Henry Plantagenet of Normandy (1133-1189), who was her junior by eleven years. Their marriage, barely 8 weeks after her divorce, made Henry master of most of today's France. With Eleanor's support Henry became King of England too in 1154. Although Eleanor's first marriage had resulted in only two daughters born in fifteen year, Eleanor bore Henry five sons and three daughters. As the children grew up and Henry openly took mistresses, the couple grew apart. Eleanor was 44 years old, when she gave birth to their youngest son, John Lackland. By then she had discovered the existence of Rosamund Clifford, the most famous of Henry's mistresses. Later Henry arranged a fiancee for his homosexual son Richard Lionheart. She was a daughter of Louis VII and his second wife. While she was educated at the English court, her fiancee ignored her and his father, Henry, seduced her. In 1169 Henry sent Eleanor to Aquitaine to restore order as its duchess. Once more the ducal palace at Poitiers became the centre of all that was civilised and refined. Troubadours, musicians and scholars were welcomed at Poitiers. There, in 1170 Eleanor reconciled with her first born daughter Marie of France, countess of Champagne. Marie's protégé, Chrétien de Troyes, composed, at Marie's suggestion, the romance of Lancelot and Queen Guinevere. In addition, Marie had a "code of love" written down in thirty-one articles. They described feminist ideas far beyond the 12th century cult of chivalry. In addition, Eleanor sponsored the "courts of love" in which men having problems with the code of love could bring their questions before a tribunal of ladies for judgement. At Christmas 1172 Henry summoned his wife and sons to his court. When in 1173 their sons revolted against their father, Eleanor backed them and was subsequently imprisoned by Henry until his death in 1189. By then three of their sons had already died and Henry's successor was Eleanor's favourite son, Richard I Lionheart (1157-1199), who appreciated his mother's advice. When he went on crusade, Eleanor became regent. Although Richard was a homosexual, he was supposed to provide England with heirs, so Eleanor escorted his bride-to-be to Sicily. When Richard was killed in 1199, he was succeeded by his youngest brother, John Lackland (1166-1216). Eleanor returned to Aquitaine and retired in the abbey of Fontevraud. She remained busy and active and personally arranged a the marriage of her Castilian granddaughter to the grandson of Louis VII. Thus she lived to be about 82, an extraordinary age in the middle ages. Copyright (c) 1996 by J.N.W. Bos. All rights reserved

[3121] BIOGRAPHY: Second and eldest surviving son of Henry II. Richard had little interest in Britain, except for using it as a bank to finance his Middle Eastern and Continental ambitions. As soon as he had succeeded his father, Richard began selling the offices of state to raise money for his cherished crusade. England during his time was run by a series of Justiciars who in effect were regents. Richard only returned to his kingdom once in 1194 to put down the rebellion of his brother Prince John and to be crowned a second time. The rest of his reign was spent in incessant wars in France. BIOGRAPHY: Richard Lion-Heart, 1157-99 (r.1189-99), was duke of Aquitaine from 1172 and fought against his father, Henry II, and later against his brothers. As king, he set out (1190) on the Third Crusade with Philip II of France and stormed the city of Acre. Richard concluded a treaty with Saladin permitting Christians to visit the holy places of Jerusalem. On his return, he was captured (1192) and became the prisoner of Holy Roman Emperor Henry VI. Henry exacted from Richard a huge ransom and recognition of England's status as a fief of the Empire. Released in 1194, Richard returned briefly to England. He was killed in a minor battle in France. Although he was seldom in England, Richard's military prowess made him a central figure in English romance. (From www.encyclopedia.com)

[3114] King John was the youngest son of Henry II. He ruled England from 1199 to 1216 (during the time of Robin Hood!). Under the English custom of primogenitor (whereby the oldest son inherits the entire estate and the titles of his father), the younger son John was left with no land inheritance, giving him his first nickname of "Lackland." However, during his reign, King John earned another even less desirable nickname: "Softsword." This referred to his lack of control over his subjects and came about after he ran away from a fight for power which he had instigated with the King of France. In 1216 when faced by the invasion of a French army he refused to fight them on the coast as, we are told, his history books well reminded him of the fate of a previous king in 1066 who did just that! John's refusal to risk all on one decisive battle led to the long civil war of 1216-8. He was looked upon with disdain and was the laughing-stock of all England. Rebellious subjects, led by the Barons who had been heavily taxed without any representation in the government, captured London in 1215. King John could see that he was hopelessly defeated and in a real jam. Rather than fighting on, he reluctantly agreed to sign the Magna Carta (Latin for "Great Charter"), drafted by his enemies. This was not just a peace treaty, but one of the most important documents in the history of basic human rights - guaranteeing all English subjects due process under the law. This was a big improvement over the way things had been under earlier kings, where many subjects were considered no more than the property of the Crown, disposable at the whim of any noble. Between 1200 and 1204 he fought increasingly losing campaigns to hold onto his Continental possessions. In England he was responsible for refining the government and was instrumental in the spread of literacy. King John, despite his bad reputation, was possibly one of the most learned of all the English kings. He was a keen historian and lawgiver who enjoyed nothing more than to stand in judgement on his peoples. This keen sense of involvement in the running of the kingdom no doubt helped antagonise his baronage, who quite rightly thought that their many privileges were under threat. Magna Carta was the work of an admittedly unwilling King John and his impressive legal advisors, not the rag tag army of discontented barons who faced him at Runnymede. He died of dysentery at Newark in October 1216 after the infamous loss of the crown jewels when his baggage train overturned in the Wellestream.

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Joseph Earl Sheffield / Maria St. John

Husband: Joseph Earl Sheffield
Born: 19 Jun 1793at: Southport, Connecticut, USA
Married: 22 Aug 1822at:
Died: 16 Feb 1882at: New Haven, Connecticut, USA
Father:
Mother:
Wife: Maria St. John
Born: 1801at:
Died: 1889at:
Father:
Mother:
Children
Name: Sarah Elizabeth Sheffield
Born: 20 Mar 1828at:
Died: 16 Oct 1848at:
Spouses:

Name: Harriet Carthy Sheffield
Born: 1831at:
Died: 8 Jan 1901at:
Spouses:

Name: Mary Hulder Sheffield
Born: 19 Dec 1832at:
Died: 28 Mar 1848at:
Spouses:

Name: Josephine Earl Sheffield
Born: 3 Nov 1834at:
Died: 30 May 1908at:
Spouses:

Name: Henry Kneeland Sheffield
Born: 5 Mar 1836at:
Died: 22 Mar 1841at:
Spouses:

Name: Ellen Maria 'Loodleloo' Sheffield [4776] [4777] [4778] [4779] [4780] [4781] [4782]
Born: 4 Aug 1838[4776] [4777] at: New York City, New York, USA
Married: at:  
Died: 31 Aug 1920[4778] [4779] at: New York City, New York, USA
Spouses: William Walter Phelps

Name: Florence Sheffield
Born: 4 Jul 1840at:
Died: 25 Apr 1928at:
Spouses:

Name: George St. John Sheffield
Born: 2 Apr 1842at:
Died: 14 Dec 1924at:
Spouses:

Name: Charles Joseph Sheffield
Born: 6 Sep 1844at:
Died: 26 Jul 1895at:
Spouses:


Pedigree Chart for: Joseph Earl Sheffield

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Joseph Earl  Sheffield 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Maria St. John

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Maria  St. John 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

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William Franklin Claggett / Nellie L. Blackwell

Husband: William Franklin Claggett
Born: 10 Jan 1868at:
Married: 27 Jul 1911at:
Died: 16 Feb 1935at:
Father: Alexander Bennett Claggett
Mother: Mary E. Priest
Notes: [8247]
Wife: Nellie L. Blackwell
Born: at:
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Notes: [8301]
Children

Pedigree Chart for: William Franklin Claggett

      /--Ferdinand  Claggett 
   /--William G.  Claggett 
   |  \--Nancy  Sanford 
/--Alexander Bennett  Claggett 
|  |  /--
|  \--Jane  Rector 
|     \--
|--William Franklin  Claggett 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Mary E.  Priest 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Nellie L. Blackwell

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Nellie L.  Blackwell 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

[8247] No children were born to any of the three marriages.

[8301] Nellie was from Hominy, Oklahoma


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