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Philipp Gottlieb Elias Bremser / Katherine Philopena Klein

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Philipp Gottlieb Elias Bremser / Katherine Philopena Klein

Husband: Philipp Gottlieb Elias Bremser
Born: 22 Sep 1864[135] [136] [137] at: Heidenrod-Grebenroth, Hessen-Nassau, Preußen, Germany
Married: 27 May 1888at: Bergschwalbach, Rhineland-Palitinate, Germany
Died: 19 Jan 1948[138] [139] at: Norwalk, Huron, Ohio, United States
Father: Philipp Nikolaus Karl Bremser
Mother: Marie Jacobine Weidenmueller
Notes: [142]
Sources: [135] [136] [137] [138] [139] [140] [141] [143] [144]
Wife: Katherine Philopena Klein
Born: 11 Mar 1863at: Burgschwalbach, Rhein-Lahn-Kreis, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
Died: 25 Apr 1948[145] at: Norwalk, Huron, Ohio, United States
Father: Johann Jacob Klein
Mother: Katharine Wilhelmine Seel
Notes: [149]
Sources: [145] [146] [147] [148] [150]
Children
Name: Elizabethe Margarethe Wilhelmine Bremser [123] [119] [120] [121] [122]
Born: 2 Nov 1888[119] [120] at: Hähnstatten, Rhineland-Pfalz, Germany
Married: at:  
Died: 2 Jun 1952at: Sandusky, Huron, Ohio
Spouses: Johnson Tucker Beasley

Name: Anna Karlena Augusta Bremser [602] [600]
Born: 4 Feb 1891[600] at: Germany
Married: at:  
Died: 21 May 1978at: Fort Myers, Lee, Florida, USA
Spouses: Jacob 'Jake' Daniel Miller

Name: Edna Bremser [607] [603] [604] [605] [606]
Born: 27 Apr 1893[603] [604] at: Norwalk, Huron, Ohio, United States
Died: 1 May 1897at: Norwalk, Huron, Ohio, United States
Spouses:

Name: Wilhelmena Philippina Bremser [608]
Born: 18 Jul 1896at: Norwalk, Huron, Ohio, United States
Married: at:  
Died: 10 Jul 1993at: Norwalk, Huron, Ohio, United States
Spouses: Kurt Nicholas Klein

Name: infant Bremser [639] [638]
Born: 22 Jun 1901[638] at: Norwalk, Huron, Ohio, United States
Died: 22 Jun 1901at: Norwalk, Huron, Ohio, United States
Spouses:


Pedigree Chart for: Philipp Gottlieb Elias Bremser

      /--Johann Adam  Bremser 
   /--Johann Adam  Bremser 
   |  \--
/--Philipp Nikolaus Karl  Bremser 
|  |  /--
|  \--Catharine Elisabethe  Bach 
|     \--
|--Philipp Gottlieb Elias  Bremser 
|     /--
|  /--Johann Daniel  Weidenmueller 
|  |  \--
\--Marie Jacobine  Weidenmueller 
   |  /--
   \--Anna Katharina  Maus 
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Katherine Philopena Klein

      /--Wilhelm  Klein 
   /--Johann Ludwig  Klein 
   |  \--
/--Johann Jacob  Klein 
|  |  /--Johann Philipp  Butzbach 
|  \--Philippine Christiene  Butzbach 
|     \--
|--Katherine Philopena  Klein 
|     /--
|  /--Johann Phillipp  Seel 
|  |  \--
\--Katharine Wilhelmine  Seel 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

[142] The ancestral home of the Bremser family is [the castle] Brömserburg. "From the early 10th to the early 19th centuries it was the property of the archbishops of Mainz. They converted the old fortress into a residence in the 12th century. Originally, it was right on the banks of the Rhine, surrounded by water. Its more than two-meter-thick walls withstood all offensives. Only the southeastern portion destroyed by the Duke Of Longvville. A mine path to the keep bears witness to its invincibility. After being secularirzed in 1803, the castle had several owners until the town of Ruesdeheim purchased it in 1941. Today, it is the home of the vast collections that comprise the Rheingau wine museum. Historic wine presses form several centures are displayed in the garden."

"On Oberstrasse, there is a row of beautiful old mansions from various periods, including the Frankensteiner Hof, Ritter'scher Hof and Bassenheimer Hof. Howwever, the Broemserhof, constructed from 1542 onward, is doubtlessly the most beautiful of all the noble manors on this street. This former residence of Ruedesheriim's ancient Boremser dynasty has an impressive Gothic chapel and an ancestral hall with splendid frescoes. Today, the Broemserhof houses a museum."

Also in Ruedesheim is St. Jakobus Church. The "Catholic parish church on market square. The church dates form the 14th century and is said to have been built by the knight and Crusader Johann Broemser. The half moon and star on the weather vane atop the chruch tower are a reminder of the days of the Crusades, The church was almost completely destroyed in 1944 during WWII, but was rebuilt of quarried brick typical of the Rhine area. Of special note are the medieval tombsones with effigies of Ruedesheim's nobility, situated in the northern aisle, as well as the Gothic tyjmpanium above the western portal."

-- Ruedesheim web site

Henry was always known to his descendants as Heinrich Gottleib Bremser, or Henry Bremser. However, the birth record for his daughter Elizabeth Margarete Bremser gives his name as Philipp Gottleib Elias Bremser, as does his own birth record. He may have adopted Heinrich to differentiate himself from his other brother, also named Philip.

----------------------

The text of the wedding banns (wedding announcement):

No. 12 (1888) (- the number was mentioned in the church record) Hahnstaetten, at May 19, 1888

In front of the signing registry officer showed up for the purpose of marriage:

1. The farmer Philipp Gottlieb Elias Bremser, known by person, evangelic religion, born at September 22, 1864 in Grebenroth, living in Hahnstaetten, son of the linenweaver Philipp Nikolaus Karl Bremser and his dead wife Marie Jacobine born Weidenmueller, living in Grebenroth
2. Katharine Philippine Klein, known by person, evangelic religion, born at March 11, 1863 in Burgschwalbach, living in Burgschwalbach, daughter of the stonecutter Johann Jacob Klein and his dead wife Katharine Wilhelmine born Seel, living in Burgschwalbach.

Witnesses of his banns (wedding announcement) were:
3. the cabinet-maker Philipp Wilhelm Busch, known by person, 21 years old, living in Burgschwalbach,
4. the tailor Philipp Friedrich Debusmann, known by person, 26 years old, living in Hähnstaetten.

----------------------

Thus it appears that sometime between his wedding and his arrival in the United States four years later he adopted Heinrich (or Henry) as his name.

Henry arrived in the United States via Ellis Island on 12 May 1892 on board the Spree. According to his daughter, Minnie, "the voyage took 30 days and the ocean was very rough and the boat rocked and most everyone was sick. They were told that the food in the steerage class was not good and to take a supply of food with them, she told of taking hard boiled eggs and they were so sick the couldn't eat them and gave them to the helpers on the boat."

The Spree was built for North German Lloyd, German flag, in 1890. She ran the Bremerhaven-New York and Mediterranean-New York service. She was renamed Kaiserin Maria Theresia in 1899 and ran the Mediterranean-New York service. In 1904 she was transferred to the Russian Navy and renamed the Ural. She was put into the auxiliary naval cruiser service and sunk off Japan in 1905.

The Family Prospers

After Elizabeth was born, Henry and Phillipina later had four more children: Lena, born in 1891; Edna, was born in 1893 and died at age 4; Wilhelmina "Minnie", born in 1896, who later married her first cousin, Curt Klein; and an unnamed son who died at childbirth in 1901. He was buried over Edna in the family plot in Norwalk.

Henry Bremser and his family joined the local German-speaking Lutheran congregation at St. Paul's German Lutheran Church. In about 1923, the number of German-speaking immigrants had seriously declined. The church could not afford to remain independent. It joined with the English-speaking congregation, and all services were conducted in English. In a warm welcome to the united church, the children were taught to sing a traditional German Christmas carol. My then 12-year old mother (Annabeth Beasley) was one of the children who sang for her grandparents in December, 1938.

A new church building was raised in 1924. Several years later, during the depths of the Great Depression, Henry paid for a bell to be installed in the empty bell tower.

The Brothers Form Bremser Coal and Supply Co.

Henry Bremser had three brothers: Phillip, Karl, and Wilhelm. A baby sister apparently died in infancy. Karl followed his brothers Henry and Phillip to the United States on April 12, 1910. Two of Henry's brothers, Phillip and Wilhelm, came to Norwalk from Germany. Philip worked in the masonry business and Wilhelm helped make cement blocks.

Henry Bremser started making cement blocks in the basement of their home at 53 E. Elm St., Norwalk, Ohio."He made these mostly in the evenings after working as a mason all day, and Gramma Bremser had to put up with the cement dust filtering all around," according to her granddaughter, Jane Beasley. This small start led to the beginning of the Bremser Coal and Supply Co. on Woodlawn Ave.

In 1909, the current operator of the Bell Coal Company learned that natural gas would soon be piped into Norwalk. He interrupted Henry's walk home one day past his plant and offered to sell him the coal company. Henry, while also aware of the possibile availability of natural gas in Norwalk, nonetheless said yes. Nearly the entire purchase was funded from savings Bina had secreted away.

Another Klein brother, Karl, was brought over later on. He did not fare as well, and returned to Germany within a few years of his arrival. He lived for some time and had a family, but apparently was never very successful. Minnie Bremser Klein, in a letter from 1922 after a visit to Burgschwabach, said he was still struggling.

-------------------------

A Carol for Henry Bremser

By 1924, the old St. Paul's German Lutheran Church on the northside of Norwalk had experienced a significant decline in German speaking members. It was finally shuttered and the remaining 12 members joined St. Peter's. Marilyn Field, daughter of the pastor at the time, Carl Wannemacher, remembers welcoming the new members with a rendition of "Oh Tannenbaum."

She writes: "We used to have a choir made up of seventh and eighth grade girls directed by Mrs. Augusta Kohlmeyer. The year that Mr. (Henry) Bremser and the other members of the German Lutheran Church joined our church Dad thought it would be nice if we girls would sing "Oh Tannenbaum" in German. (That is, "0h Christmas Tree".)

"He thought it would make Mr. Bremser and the other German members who joined feel more at home. We learned all four verses and I still love to sing it today in German, although I only remember the first verse and need help on the others. Dad told Mr. Bremser to be sure and come to the Christmas program and Mr. Bremser was very pleased."

(My then 12-year-old mother, Annabeth Beasley, was one of the children who learned to sing O Tannenbaum that year. The carol remained a cherished favorite her entire life, and she always recalled the tears in her grandpa's eyes as she sang in her best German.)

A Tower Without a BelI... Until Henry Bremser Came Along

In the late winter of 1924, the congregation of St. Peter Evangelical Lutheran Church in Norwalk, Ohio, wavered between building plans it could afford and a church design it really wanted. Like a wide-eyed Christmas shopper with a credit card, it ordered the church it wanted, and prayed it could pay for it.

The question was whether to build a church for $25,000 without a bell tower or spend $31,000 for a building with a bell tower. The congregation couldn't resist the drawing with the bell tower and the vote was unanimous. A Monroeville contractor, Henry Schneider, thought the estimate by architect Granville Scott - with or without a bell tower - was too low. And he was right. Nevertheless, the tower became part of the new St. Peter Evangelical Lutheran Church, even though there were no plans for a bell to go in it.

The bell came later in 1936, during the depth of the Great Depression. Henry Bremser, who owned a coal yard in Norwalk, persuaded the vestry to create a fund for a bell. He had come from Germany where all churches had bells, and he thought St. Peter should have one. The vestry agreed but vowed there would be no bell until it had money to pay for one. Bremser apparently overcame this problem by writing a personal check for most of the cost. The 966-pound bell was cast of copper and tin by a St. Louis company. A hole was cut in the ceiling above a stairway, and the bell was hoisted into place with a rope and pulley. Senior deacons Merrill White and Elmer Christel were placed in charge of ringing the bell on Sunday mornings.

Occasionally a deacon would pull too hard on the rope and the bell would flip over the top and become stuck upside down. The custodian, Walter Schlegelmilch, would climb through a trapdoor in the ceiling of the balcony to reach the bell and flip it back.

The bell was left behind when St. Peter sold the church to the Salvation Army in 1974. A free-standing bell tower was erected at the new church on Benedict Avenue in 1978, again at the persistence of a German immigrant, Ulrich Mangold. It was designed by a son, Ernest Mangold. The price was $17,677. Three years later, the congregation removed the bell from its old church and re-hung it in the tower in front of the church where Norwalk Lutherans worship today.

The old bell that Henry Bremser bought no longer is rung, but there is a device inside to toll it during The Lord's Prayer. The sound of ringing church bells you hear at St. Peter is from a tape player connected to speakers in the tower. The three bells you see in the tower are mostly for show. But one of them has more than esthetic value. It's linked forever to the congregation's past.

From "One Hundred Years of Amazing Grace, History of a Lutheran Congregation, 1901-2001." St. Peter Evangelical Lutheran Church, 243 Benedict Ave., Norwalk, OH 44857 p48

-------------------------

Apparently life was not easy at times for the children, who lived in the new America but experienced the old-world ways of their father.

Elizabeth apprenticed herself at age 12 or 13 in Norwalk, Ohio to a milliner (women's hat maker) for no pay. After a short time, less than a year, she left her family in Norwalk and moved to Columbus, Ohio. The two ladies who ran the millinery shop in Norwalk got her a job in a shop in Columbus and a place to stay in a Quaker boarding house.

Lizzie Moves to Chicago

Lizzie discovered that the milliner trade was seasonal and the next Christmas she got a job as a saleswoman. She found she liked that work more. The next winter, when hat season ended, she went with a friend to Chicago and got a temporary job at Marshall Fields, the largest retailer and most exclusive department store in the city. She outsold all the other employees and was given a full-time job.

Several years later she met Johnson Tucker Beasley, who was selling stationary at the time. They dated and were engaged two months later. Lizzie wrote home in January 1913, "I am going to be married Friday night at 8:30 and shall be at home to see you some time Sat. depends on trains and John is going to find out tomorrow and I shall let you know later. Now don't say I am foolish as my husband to be and myself are in our right minds. His name is John Beasley... [We] became engaged last Sunday and [I] shall be Mrs. Beasley by next Sunday."

Henry and Philippina Bremser (center) and their family. Back row, L-R Minnie Bremser (Klien), Lena Bremser (Miller), Elizabeth Bremser (Beasley), and Jake Miller; (middle row, L-R) Curt Klein, Thelma Miller, Leland Miller, Gramma Bremser, Grampa Bremser, Jane Beasley, and Marie Miller; (front row, L-R) Annabeth Beasley, Bob Klein, Mary Siefert, and Majorie Miller.

Elizabeth and Johnson Beasley faced unbearable challenges during their marriage. Their first child, Robert, was born 11 months after they married and died four days later. Three years later they had twin girls, Ruth and Jane. Only two years later, Ruth died in the 1919 worldwide flu pandemic. In 1920, Betty was born. The doctors said she had a congenital heart defect, and she would die young. Betty lived longer than expected, until she was four-and-a-half. The stress on the marriage was great; Johnson moved back to Chicago and they later divorced.

The Daughters Grow Up

Annabeth and Jane were raised by their mother. Elizabeth Bremser worked various jobs and moved several times between Norwalk, Kansas City, Detroit and Decatur. Unable to pay the mortgage on the house in Kansas City, she moved out and rented it. She worked as a governess within a children's home for a while. Elizabeth later found a job watching another family's children and was able to get a room in the house for her and Annabeth. For a period of time they stayed in Norwalk with her parents. Jane was off to college by around 1935, which Grampa Bremser, at Gramma Minnie's suggestion, helped with.

Henry operated the coal company jointly with his mason and contracting business until his retirement in 1923. When Henry retired, the company was split between two sons-in-laws Jake Miller and Curt Klein. Elizabeth, by this time seperated or divorced from her husband Johnson, was told she would her share of the business when Henry and Minnie died. Instead, Minnie persuaded Henry to pay off the two mortgages on Elizabeth's home in Kansas City. This enabled Elizabeth and Annabeth to return to Kansas City and live there. Jane, making almost $750 a month at age 18 as a teacher, bought her mother and sister a new stove.

Curt assumed control of the coal company and ran it from 1924 until his retirement in 1955. The cement company went on to pour much of the concrete when the interstate highway system was built through the area.

When the Depression hit, Johnson Beasley lost his well-paying job selling seats for a manufacturer. For a time, he managed the Bismarck Hotel in Chicago. Johnson remained in Chicago, largely estranged from his daughters, and died there in 1950 at age 64.

Elizabeth stayed in Ohio and moved to Sandusky. After a heart attack, she entered a convalescent facility, where she died in 1952.

Her daughter Jane had no children. Annabeth, my mother, married Hal Phelps and had two boys, myself (Brian) and my brother (Bud). Bud died in August, 2000. Jane passed away less than two weeks later. Annabeth died in her sleep within six months of her son and her sister, at age 73.

Obituary

Henry Bremser, 84, whose name has been associated with the coal and building supply business here for more than a half-century, died at 5 a.m. this morning at his home 57 E. Elm following a lengthy illness.

Mr. Bremser, who founded the Bresmer Coal & Supply company here, was born Sept. 22, 1864, in Nassau, Germany, and emigrated to this country with his wife and family in 1892 and made his home in Norwalk since.

A mason by trade, Mr. Bremser later entered the contracting business and is attributed to being the first man in Huron county to engage in cement block manufacturing. In 1909 he purchased the Bell Coal company which he operated jointly with his mason and contracting business until his retirement in 1923.

He was a life-time member of the Lutheran church and for the past 17 years was a member of the Norwalk St. Peter Lutheran church.

Surviving are his wife, Phillipena Klein Bremser, to whom he was married May 27, 1888, three daughters, Mrs. E.M. Beasley, Kansas City, Mo., Mrs J.D. Miller and Mrs. Curt Klein, both of this city, eight grandchildren and six greatgranddhildren; a brother, Carl, of Germany. He was preceded in death by a daughter who died in infancy.

Friends will be received at the residence Tuesday where services will be held 2 p.m. Wednesday followed by rites at 2:30 from St. Peter's church. The Rev. Carl Wannemacher will be the officiating minister.

Burial will be in Woodland with the Orebaugh funeral service in charge of arrangements.

--Norwalk "Reflector-Herald" January 19, 1948

[149] Her name is spelled in various sources as Philobena, Phillapena, and Philapena. The chosen spelling is from her 50th wedding anniversary program. According to her daughter, Minnie, "mother told me her father was very opposed to Mom and Dad getting married." Phillipina was pregnant with their first child when they married: they married on 27 May 1888 and their first child, Elizabeth, was born 2 Nov 1888.

The first of the Klein family to come to the United States were brother and sister Marie Henrietta "Haddie" Klein and Henry Klein. According to oral family history, Henrietta lost her wallet and all her money on the boat coming to America. Haddie and Henry headed for Norwalk, Ohio. According to Henry's niece, Minnie Klein, "...Henry got work at the old Wheeling and Lake Erie Railroad roundhouse and Haddie found work for a family as housekeeper." Another sister, Elizabeth "Lizzie" Klein (m. Ernst Loeffler) and then Karl Klein came next.

Marie Henrietta was known as Haddie most of her life, as was her daughter Hedwig. Henrietta's or Haddie's husband Johann Andrew Opel came to America from Germany on 23 December 1882 and settled in the Norwalk, Ohio area, where he and Haddie Klein met. They were married on 20 January 1887 and moved to a farm south of Deerfield, Michigan on Rodisiler Highway. It was later called the Carl Goetz Farm. Johann, Henrietta, and baby Marie are all buried in the Deerfield Cemetery (Lot#262) in Deerfield, Michigan.

The four siblings saved money and in 1892 sent it to Germany to bring over their sister, my great-grandmother and father, Philipena Klein Bremser and her husband, Heinrich Gottlieb Bremser.

Philipena, nicknamed "Bina" according to her granddaughter Annabeth Beasley, was the daughter of Johann Jacob Klein and Katherine Wilhelmine Seel. Philipena was the second of six brothers and sisters: Wilhelm, Philipena, Henry, Haddie, Elizabeth, and Karl. Jacob Klein's oldest son, Wilhelm II, remained in Germany and attained the highest rank in Forestry. He was married and had three children by his first wife: William (Wilhelm? — killed in WWI), Hedwing, and Curt.

Philipena and her family arrived on Ellis Island in New York Harbor at age 29, on May 12, 1892, on board the Spree. According to her daughter, Minnie, "the voyage took 30 days and the ocean was very rough and the boat rocked and most everyone was sick. They were told that the food in the steerage class was not good and to take a supply of food with them, she told of taking hard boiled eggs and they were so sick the couldn't eat them and gave them to the helpers on the boat."


With Philipena Klein Bremser on the ship manifest were her husband, Henry Bremser, and their two daughters, Elizabeth, age 4, and Anna Karlena ("Caroline" on the manifest), age 2. Philipena's father, Johann Jacob Klein, also made the trip with Philippina's brother Karl. The ship manifest reports Karl's age as 16; according to our information, he would have been 14 or 15 in 1892. We can only assume that if, as reported, Karl had arrived earlier in the United States and helped raise money to bring his father and sister's family over, he must have returned to Germany and come back to America with his father on the "Spree".

Minnie Klein wrote in 1984, "[Henry] had trouble finding employment and was advised to go to Loraine where he might get work in the ship yards. Whatever happened I don't recall [my mother] telling me, but her father [Jacob] became very discontent and wanted to go back to Norwalk where he could see more of the other 4 children. They moved back to 102 Milan Ave. in Norwalk before winter set in at a time when there was no work for masons which was Papa's trade. They were in such desperate circumstances that Aunt Lizzie got Mama [Bina] a job as Chamber Maid where Aunt Lizzie worked as cook. Papa stayed home and took care of the two small children and spent much of his time knitting stockings for the girls. As time went on Grandpa Klein became discontent and homesick to go back to Germany. Nothing would content him but they promised if he would be content until Spring Mama and Papa with the girls would take him back and remain in Germany, but nothing satisfied him and he became very ill just from homesickness and passed away early in 1894."

"Bina was still working at Gardners as much as she could, but became pregnant with Edna and when the Gardner's saw how miserable she was, Mr. Gardner got Papa a job at the old Lais brewery, and he would have to go to Sandusky to cut ice on the Bay and often told how he walked the whole distance to and from Sandusky, something unheard of in this modern age. As time went on and Papa was better able to master the English language conditions improved for them and they purchased the Homestead on [357] Elm St. (This was sometime prior to 1896.) Winters were always hard since there was no mason work to be had, no heated concrete in those days.

"To carry them thru the winter, Mama took in washing and ironing, if my memory serves me right she did as many as 21 washings in a week with an old wooden tub wash machine that had to be hand operated, pushing the handle back and forth for hours. Often during those winters when Papa had little or not work they would have to run up a grocery bill at a store at the intersection of Townsend and East Main. I always remember wanting do go along, and that was no short walk. But the owners of the store — [their] name was Erb — and they were also German and he would always give us a piece of candy or a wiener. When spring came and papa started back to work, he first thing Mama would aim to do is get that grocery bill paid, and I recall definitely her telling it would be nearly a hundred dollars for a winter's groceries."

In 1901, Bina "was pregnant... she got very large and she was of small stature and for the last month or so... she could hardly walk. She always sat in the rocker...and Lena and Lizzie would push Mamma around in that rocker. When her time came to deliver they had old Dr. Schuerer come to the house, no hospitals in those days, I was taken over to the Yeagers and can still remember her walking me back. The Dr. decided Mama could not give birth to the baby and it was either he save Mama or the baby, and Papa wanted Mama sound and the child had to be cut away. All I remember Mama said he was a very big baby and he was buried in the same grave as Edna.

"As time went on, Grandpa had better mastered the language he got plenty of work, but Grandma continued to take in washings and irons. At some point Papa became interested in cement blocks and it was known he was the first to manufacture cement black in Huron Co. and he made them in the basement. You may recall there were stone steps leading to the basement and he fixed a ramp so he could wheel the sand and stone into the basement and carried down the bags of cement. When he would empty a bag of cement it sifted thru everything even the house and mama nearly went crazy. He would pound out whatever number one nite, the next nite he would carry them out one by one to cure, and the pound out more and that was a routine nite after nite.

"At this time a Mr. Bell owned the buildings on R. R. property and got to know him quite well. One morning as Grandpa walked thru his property enroute to go uptown, cross-lots, as we called it in those days, Mr. Bell stopped Dad and ask if he would be interested to buy his buildings, since it appeared in the newspaper that natural gas was going to piped into Norwalk and that would ruin his business, which was mainly coal. Dad jumped at the chance, I knew [the price] for many years, but it has left me, but it was not a big price, since mama had almost enough money saved up to buy and she was so anxious to get rid of that cement dust she gladly gave Dad the money. This was the start of Bremser Coal and Builders Supplies. Lena worked for Dad for a period of time, until she and Jake were married and then I took over the office, if my memory serves me right, I must have been about 16 [in 1914].

"I never had a high school education. I was in my Freshman year and they started having the girls who were interested and had the required grades to play. In my... middy blouse and skirt and tennis shoes, but the school did not furnish them. I went home from school all elated that I was going to play and told Mama she said I would have to tell Papa, that was the blow, Papa said if that was what I was learning in school, I was to get out of school and go to work. There were no laws in those days that could stop him. Practically every one of my teacher called Papa but he wouldn't give an inch. I had to quit school and did housework for a family named Wingiter that lived at the southwest corner of Prospect and League. I worked there until Lena and Jake were engaged [in 1914] and then Papa made arrangements for me to go to Business College, on the third floor of the building that for years was our Post Office. He paid for a 12 month course, at the end of 9 month I was permitted to take substitute work thru the Christmas Holidays, but Papa told me I could not take a steady job when I finished my 12 months, that Lena & Jake were going to be married. I faintly remember the [wedding] day was to be Aug. 12 [1914], I could be wrong.

"When I started working for Papa I had to be to work at 6:30 in the morning and worked until 5:30. On days when Papa would be working out in Country jobs Mama would bring me over some lunch at noon. These were long hours, tiresome and lonely since few customers. The business didn't flourish in those days, so to keep busy, I cleaned a room adjoining the main office, painted it and bought a sewing machine, took a course in dress making and that started my sewing and fancy needle work career. The business was started with the old blind horse that Papa bought with the business. I'll never forget she went a certain gate all day, but once she became familiar to her new home back of 53 E. Elm and knew she was headed for the barn could she trot!

Time went and Papa bought a team of horses and larger coal wagons, but soon trucks came in use and our first truck was a Ford and a man by the name of Henry Blakely drove the truck. Time went on and more cars were being used and a man by the name [blank] had a garage on Townsend Ave. close to where Route 20 branched in. He purchased coal from us and one day he came in the office and wanted to sell Papa a Reo car, Papa's answer was " I can't learn to drive a car" and the man said, "But Minnie can learn." "No" was Grandpa's reply, "She's too young." He persuaded Papa to let him take me out for a trial run and when he came back he said, "Minnie will have no trouble." That was the beginning of my driving days, no learner's license required, I just started to drive, and learned that Mrs. Mich Newman was the only other woman driver in Norwalk. That situation soon changed."

In 1922, after the end of World War I, Phillipena (Bina) Klein Bremser and her daughter Minnie went back to Burgschwalbach for a visit. During that trip, Minnie Klein met her cousin Curt. He later followed Minnie to the United States and they were married in New York in about 1926.

[123] Lizzie came to the US through Ellis Island with her parents in May 1892 when she was four years of age. Her daughter Annabeth said Elizabeth apprenticed herself at age 12 or 13 in Norwalk, Ohio to a milliner for no pay. After a short time, less than a year, she left her parents' home and Norwalk for Columbus, Ohio. The two ladies who ran the shop in Norwalk got her a job in a shop in Columbus and a place to stay in a Quaker boarding house.

Lizzie discovered that the milliner trade was seasonal and the next Christmas she got a job as a saleswoman. She found she liked that work more. The next winter, when hat season ended, she went with a friend to Chicago and got a temporary job at Marshall Fields, the largest retailer and department store in the city. She outsold all the other employees and was given a full-time job. It was there that she met Johnson Tucker Beasley, who was selling stationary at the time. They dated and were quickly engaged and married only five months later. She married without telling her parents, only telling them after the fact in a letter home:

Chicago, Ill
4-15-3

My Dear Father Mother and Sisters,

I have a letter to write to you all tonight that will be the biggest and I hope the happiest most pleasant surprise you have had in a good many years. I am going to be married Friday night at 8:30 and shall be at home to see you sometime Sat depends on trains and John is going to find out tomorrow and I shall let you know later. Now don’t say I am foolish as my husband to be and myself are in our right minds. His name is John Beasley. I have known him two months became engaged last Sunday and shall be Mrs. Beasley by next Sunday. This may all be very strange to you. But if I had known this man for 5 years I could not care more for him than I do this moment. He has just left. We made out a list of all our friends and shall send out our announcements Friday. No one but Hazel knows anything about it. We shall be married at the Baptist church here in Chicago and I quit my position Friday at noon. We have all arrangements made. I am getting the best man you shall ever want to know and I know you will all like him. He is very tall + dark + is 30 years old. He knows what he is doing and so do I. Just remember that I have for the past years always known what was best and right for me to do and a better, cleaner and good man I know I never shall want. I am nearly 24 years old. You all realize if I am ever to be married now is the time and I do love the man. I don’t know how you people will all take this but just remember I have always been God's child and will do nothing wrong and but what I think is right. I am one of the many happy girls to night and I want you all to be happy with me. I have not shed one tear and mama dear just every time you think of your daughter getting married just smile and remember the last time I said I never would get married and what little use I had for the men. It is nearly 11 o'clock and I have lots of little things to do before the event and with lots of love I send you this knowing that you understand that I am doing what is right in the sight of all business, thoughts and God.

Your Elizabeth

4324 Lake Ave
Will let you know later about trains.




Their first child was born slightly less than nine months later, indicating perhaps the reason for their sudden and speedy marriage.

Jane Beasley Raph recalls Lizzie's birthplace as being Burgschwalbach, however her birth certificate says Hähnstatten. She is buried in the family plot in Woodlawn Cemetary in Norwalk, with her parents Henry and Philopina Bremser, her aunt and uncle Minnie and Curt Klein, and her two daughters Annabeth and Jane.

[602] Based on notes compiled by Majorie Miller Barr.

Her arrival on Ellis Island is recorded under the name "Caroline".

[607] "Edna was a beautiful child and had red hair." -- her sister Minnie.

[608] Niece Annabeth Beasley said that in the period after WWII, Minnie and Curt would send a box of Rinso soap back to family in Germany. They would slip open the bottom of the box and insert cigarettes, because cigarettes were more valuable than cash and were the currency of the time in post-war Germany.

It is said that Minnie met her first cousin and future husband Curt Klein on a trip back to Germany in 1922. He is the son of Aunt Minnie's brother, Wilhelm. Uncle Curt's father was a game warden, or Forester, in charge of a portion of the local forest.

[639] His sister Minnie wrote of his birth, "Mama was pregnant... she got very large and she was of small stature and for the last month or so... she could hardly walk. She always sat in the rocker...and Lena and Lizzie woujld push Mamma around in that rocker. When her time came to deliver they had old Dr. Schuerer come to the house, no hopspitals in those days, I was taken over to the Yeagers and can still remember her walking me back. The Dr. decided Mama could not give birth to the baby and it was either he save Mama or the baby, and Papa wanted Mama sound and the child had to be cut away. All I remember Mama said he was a very big baby and he was buried in the same grave as Edna."

@1 [14172] [S173]

  • @4Data:
    Emigrated to this country...in 1892

@1 [14173] [S764]

@1 [135] [S56]

@1 [136] [S52]

@1 [137] [S57]

@1 [138] [S58]

@1 [139] [S59]

@1 [140] [S53]

  • @2Page: Section 11-East side of Ave. F.-Row 4 & 5

@1 [141] [S54]

  • @2Page: Section 11-East side of Ave. F.-Row 4 & 5

@1 [143] [S60]

@1 [144] [S61]

  • @2Page: p. 48

@1 [145] [S62]

@1 [146] [S53]

  • @2Page: Section 11-East side of Ave. F.-Row 4 & 5

@1 [147] [S54]

  • @2Page: Section 11-East side of Ave. F.-Row 4 & 5

@1 [148] [S63]

@1 [150] [S60]

@1 [119] [S16]

  • @4Data:
    Miss Bremser was born in Germany, migrated with her parents to the USA when about four years of age. The Bremser family is German, and the had lived near Frankfort.

@1 [120] [S52]

@1 [121] [S53]

  • @2Page: Section 11-East side of Ave. F.-Row 4 & 5

@1 [122] [S54]

  • @2Page: Section 11-East side of Ave. F.-Row 4 & 5

@1 [600] [S167]

    [601] Her age on the date of arrival 12 May 1892 in the passenger manifest is given as 1 yr, 9 mos.

@1 [603] [S53]

  • @2Page: Section 13- Ave. E -Row 1 & 2

@1 [604] [S54]

  • @2Page: Section 13- Ave. E -Row 1 & 2

@1 [605] [S53]

  • @2Page: Section 13- Ave. E -Row 1 & 2

@1 [606] [S54]

  • @2Page: Section 13- Ave. E -Row 1 & 2

@1 [638] [S173]

  • @4Data:
    Preceded in death by a daughter who died in infancy.

Daniel Wayne Crevison / Donna Jean Hendrickson

Husband: Daniel Wayne Crevison
Born: at: 
Died:at: 
Father:  at: 
Mother:  at: 
Wife: Donna Jean Hendrickson
Born: at: 
Died:at: 
Father:  at: 
Mother:  at: 
Children
Name: Timothy Wayne Crevison [3755]
Born: at:
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Kimberly Jean Crevison [3739]
Born: at:
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: James Darren Crevison [1103]
Born: at:
Died: at:
Spouses:


Pedigree Chart for: Daniel Wayne Crevison

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Daniel Wayne  Crevison 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Donna Jean Hendrickson

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--Donald Eugene  Hendrickson 
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Donna Jean  Hendrickson 
|     /--
|  /--Charles Herbert  Huntsman 
|  |  \--
\--Josephine Blanche  Huntsman 
   |  /--
   \--Mary Ann  Jacobs 
      \--Lucinda Josephine  Phelps 

[3774] This person is presumed living.

[3741] This person is presumed living.

[3755] This person is presumed living.

[3739] This person is presumed living.

[1103] This person is presumed living.

Edwin Sampson McNamee / Alvamine Bandy

Husband: Edwin Sampson McNamee
Born: 1844[1186] at:
Married: at:  
Died: 24 Jan 1929[1187] at:
Father: James McNamee
Mother: Elizabeth Stevens Diuguid
Wife: Alvamine Bandy
Born: ABT 1831[1195] at:
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Children
Name: Edwin Sampson McNamee Jr.
Born: 1896at:
Married: at:  
Died: 1994at:
Spouses:

Name: Blanche McNamee
Born: 1 Aug 1899at:
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Spouses: (--?--) Marshall


Pedigree Chart for: Edwin Sampson McNamee

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--James  McNamee 
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Edwin Sampson  McNamee 
|     /--George  Diuguid 
|  /--William Sampson  Diuguid 
|  |  \--Nancy  Sampson 
\--Elizabeth Stevens  Diuguid 
   |  /--George  Diuguid 
   \--Susannah  Thornhill 
      \--Elizabeth (Stevens)  Stephens 

Pedigree Chart for: Alvamine Bandy

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Alvamine  Bandy 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

@1 [1186] [S89]

  • @2Page: p. 202

@1 [1187] [S89]

  • @2Page: p. 202

@1 [1195] [S89]

  • @2Page: p. 202

Jackie Shields / Joyce Ellen Weeks

Husband: Jackie Shields
Born: at:
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Wife: Joyce Ellen Weeks
Born: at: 
Died:at: 
Father:  at: 
Mother:  at: 
Children
Name: Rodman Shields [12950]
Born: at:
Died: at:
Spouses:


Pedigree Chart for: Jackie Shields

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Jackie  Shields 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Joyce Ellen Weeks

      /--
   /--Willie Elijah  Weeks 
   |  \--
/--James Riley  Weeks 
|  |  /--
|  \--Emma May  Turman 
|     \--
|--Joyce Ellen  Weeks 
|     /--John Taylor  Bryant 
|  /--John Willis  Bryant  Sr.
|  |  \--Victoria  Haynes 
\--Maxine  Bryant 
   |  /--John Taylor  Bryant 
   \--Gladys Leigh  Robbins 
      \--

[1297] This person is presumed living.

[12950] This person is presumed living.

Aaron Adams / Sarah Hard

Husband: Aaron Adams
Born: 22 Mar 1747at: Canaan, Litchfield, Connecticut, USA
Married: 12 May 1778at:
Died: 13 Dec 1833at: Troy, Obian, Tennessee
Father: James H. Adams
Mother: Sarah Callender
Wife: Sarah Hard
Born: 11 Jun 1757at:
Died: 1854at:
Father: Abraham Hard
Mother: Charity Munsee
Children
Name: Sebastian Cabot Adams [7841]
Born: 3 Aug 1789at: Salisbury, Addison, Vermont
Married: at:  
Died: 8 Mar 1847at: Galesburg, Knox, Illinois, USA
Spouses: Eunice Harmon


Pedigree Chart for: Aaron Adams

      /--Daniel  Adams 
   /--Daniel  Adams  Jr.
   |  \--Mary Hester  Phelps 
/--James H.  Adams 
|  |  /--Abraham  Shepherd 
|  \--Thankful  Shepard 
|     \--Judith  Filbrook 
|--Aaron  Adams 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Sarah  Callender 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Sarah Hard

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--Abraham  Hard 
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Sarah  Hard 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Charity  Munsee 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

[7841] See DAR Number #102838.

Michael Spencer / Isabel Robbins

Husband: Michael Spencer
Born: 5 May 1611at: Stotfold, Bedfordshire, England
Married: ABT 1631at: Ofadrian, Stotfold, Bedfordshire, England
Died: 6 May 1653at: Lynn, Essex, Massachusetts, United States
Father: Gerard Spencer
Mother: Alice Whitbread
Sources: [1643]
Wife: Isabel Robbins
Born: ABT 1613at: of Stotbold, Bedfordshire, England
Died: 9 Oct 1674at: Salem, Essex, Massachusetts, United States
Father:
Mother:
Sources: [6248]
Children
Name: William Spencer [6249]
Born: 1656at: Haddam, Middlesex, Connecticut, USA
Died: 1712at: East Haddam, Middlesex, Connecticut, United States
Spouses:

Name: Michael Spencer [6250]
Born: ABT 1648at: Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA
Died: 16 Mar 1723at: East Greenwich, Kent, Rhode Island, United States
Spouses:

Name: Susannah Spencer [6251]
Born: 1643at: Lynn, Essex, Massachusetts, United States
Died: 12 Oct 1724at: Salem, Essex, Massachusetts, United States
Spouses:

Name: John Spencer [6180]
Born: 1638at: of East Greenwich, Kent, Rhode Island
Married: at:  
Died: 31 Aug 1684at: East Greenwich, Kent, Rhode Island, United States
Spouses: Susannah


Pedigree Chart for: Michael Spencer

      /--John  Spencer 
   /--Michael  Spencer 
   |  \--Ann (Agnes)  Merrill 
/--Gerard  Spencer 
|  |  /--
|  \--Elizabeth  Whitebread 
|     \--
|--Michael  Spencer 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Alice  Whitbread 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Isabel Robbins

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Isabel  Robbins 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

@1 [1643] [S44]

@1 [6248] [S44]

@1 [6249] [S44]

@1 [6250] [S44]

@1 [6251] [S44]

@1 [6180] [S44]

Henry de Beauchamp Duke of Warwick / Cecille Neville Sheriff of Worcester

Husband: Henry de Beauchamp Duke of Warwick
Born: 22 Mar 1424[5636] at: Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England
Married: 1434at: Salisbury, Wiltshire, England
Died: 11 Jun 1446at: Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England
Father:
Mother:
Wife: Cecille Neville Sheriff of Worcester
Born: ABT 1426at: Salisbury, Wiltshire, England
Died: 28 Jul 1450at:
Father: Richard Neville Earl of Salisbury
Mother: Alice Montagu Countess of Sal
Children
Name: Anne Beauchamp Countess of Warwick [7693] [7694]
Born: Feb 1443[7693] [7694] at: Cardiff, Wales
Died: 3 Jan 1448at: Ewelme, Oxford, England
Spouses:


Pedigree Chart for: Henry de Beauchamp Duke of Warwick

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Henry de  Beauchamp  Duke of Warwick
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Cecille Neville Sheriff of Worcester

      /--
   /--Ralph de  Neville  First Earl of Westmoreland
   |  \--
/--Richard  Neville  Earl of Salisbury
|  |  /--John of Gaunt  Plantagenet  Duke of Lancaster
|  \--Joan de  Beaufort 
|     \--Catherine Swynford  Roet 
|--Cecille  Neville  Sheriff of Worcester
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Alice  Montagu  Countess of Sal
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

@1 [5636] [S426]

  • @2Page: Vol. XII, p. ii; Vol IV pp383-384

@1 [7693] [S496]

  • @2Page: pp 384-385

@1 [7694] [S426]

  • @2Page: p. 282

Josiah Parsons / Sarah Sheldon

Husband: Josiah Parsons
Born: 2 Jan 1682at: Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, United States
Married: 22 Jun 1710at: Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, United States
Died: 12 Apr 1768at: Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, United States
Father: Joseph Parsons
Mother: Elizabeth P. Strong
Sources: [5176]
Wife: Sarah Sheldon
Born: 16 Jul 1688at: Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, United States
Died: 14 Dec 1738at: Northampton, Hampden, Massachusetts, United States
Father: Isaac Sheldon
Mother: Sarah Warner
Sources: [5177]
Children
Name: Josiah Parsons [5180]
Born: 14 Sep 1711at: Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, United States
Died: Nov 1711at:
Spouses:

Name: Josiah Parsons [5181]
Born: 9 Jun 1713at: Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, United States
Died: 23 May 1796at:
Spouses:

Name: Isaac Parsons [5179]
Born: 23 Dec 1715at: Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, United States
Died: 11 Jul 1798at: Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, United States
Spouses:

Name: Enoch Parsons [5182]
Born: 6 Sep 1717at: Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, United States
Died: 23 Sep 1719at:
Spouses:

Name: Jacob Parsons [5178]
Born: 20 Oct 1719at: Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, United States
Died: 19 Jan 1795at: Northampton, Hampden, Massachusetts, United States
Spouses:

Name: Esther Parsons [5183]
Born: 25 Jul 1721at: Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, United States
Died: 12 Oct 1740at:
Spouses:

Name: Sarah Parsons [5184]
Born: 29 May 1723at: Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, United States
Died: 26 Feb 1807at: Amherst, , Ma
Spouses:

Name: Hannah Parsons [5185]
Born: 11 Jun 1725at: Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, United States
Died: 1745at:
Spouses:

Name: Martha Parsons [3523]
Born: 3 May 1727at: , Chester, Hampden, Massachusetts, USA
Married: at:  
Died: 23 Dec 1814at: , Chester, Hampden, Massachusetts, USA
Spouses: Martin Phelps


Pedigree Chart for: Josiah Parsons

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--Joseph  Parsons 
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Josiah  Parsons 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Elizabeth P.  Strong 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Sarah Sheldon

      /--Ralph  Sheldon 
   /--Isaac  Sheldon 
   |  \--Barbara  Stone 
/--Isaac  Sheldon 
|  |  /--Thomas  Woodford 
|  \--Mary  Woodford 
|     \--Mary  Blott 
|--Sarah  Sheldon 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Sarah  Warner 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

@1 [5176] [S44]

@1 [5177] [S44]

@1 [5180] [S44]

@1 [5181] [S44]

@1 [5179] [S44]

@1 [5182] [S44]

@1 [5178] [S44]

@1 [5183] [S44]

@1 [5184] [S44]

@1 [5185] [S44]

@1 [3523] [S44]

(--?--) / Mindwell Hosford

Husband: (--?--)
Wife: Mindwell Hosford
Born: 20 May 1722at: Hebron, Tolland, Connecticut, United States
Died: 31 Mar 1807at: Hebron, Tolland, Connecticut, United States
Father: Obadiah Hosford
Mother: Mindwell Phelps
Notes: [3728]
Sources: [3729] [3730]
Children
Name: Aaron II Phelps [5048]
Born: 31 Mar 1743at:
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Mindwell Phelps
Born: 1744at:
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Sarah Phelps
Born: 30 Mar 1745at:
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Nathan Phelps
Born: 1750at:
Died: at:
Spouses:


Pedigree Chart for: Mindwell Hosford

      /--William  Horseford 
   /--John  Hosford 
   |  \--Sarah   
/--Obadiah  Hosford 
|  |  /--
|  \--Phillipi  Thrall 
|     \--
|--Mindwell  Hosford 
|     /--George  Phelps 
|  /--Joseph  Phelps 
|  |  \--Philura  Randall 
\--Mindwell  Phelps 
   |  /--George  Phelps 
   \--Mary  Porter 
      \--Mary  Stanley 

[3728] Mindwell Hosford is the niece of John Phelps' mother, Sarah Hosford. Mindwell and her mother-in-law's common ancestors are John Hosford and Phillipi Thrall. In other words, her mother-in-law is also her aunt.

[5048] Arron Married Abigail BARBER.

@1 [3729] [S44]

@1 [3730] [S80]

John Phelps / Anna Baker

Husband: John Phelps
Born: 2 Nov 1756at: Enfield, Hartford, Connecticut, United States
Married: 22 Mar 1779at:
Died: 13 Oct 1841at: Colebrook, Litchfield, Connecticut, United States
Father: David Phelps Sr.
Mother: Margaret Colton
Notes: [4068]
Wife: Anna Baker
Born: at:
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Children
Name: Martha Phelps
Born: 6 Sep 1749at:
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Spouses: Silas Mead

Name: John Phelps [4108] [4107]
Born: 8 Dec 1779at: Colebrook, Litchfield, Connecticut, United States
Married: at:  
Died: 25 Oct 1839[4107] at: Granville, Ohio
Spouses: Statira Graves

Name: Elihu Phelps
Born: 10 Apr 1782at: Colebrook, Litchfield, Connecticut, United States
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Spouses: Margaret Cruickshank

Name: Chauncy Phelps
Born: 17 May 1785at: Colebrook, Litchfield, Connecticut, United States
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Spouses: Polly Shattuck

Name: Sylvester Ira Phelps [3863]
Born: 4 May 1786at:
Married: at:  
Died: 13 May 1851at: Leesburg Township, Union, Ohio
Spouses: Maria Lathrop

Name: Levi Phelps
Born: 16 Oct 1789at: Colebrook, Litchfield, Connecticut, United States
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Spouses: Sarah Cooper

Name: Anna Phelps
Born: 9 Mar 1792at: Colebrook, Litchfield, Connecticut, United States
Married: at:  
Died: 14 Aug 1850at:
Spouses: Joseph Peck

Name: Ralzeman Phelps
Born: 7 Apr 1794at: Colebrook, Litchfield, Connecticut, United States
Died: 11 Feb 1802at:
Spouses:


Pedigree Chart for: John Phelps

      /--Jacob  Phelps 
   /--Israel  Phelps 
   |  \--Dorothy  Ingersoll 
/--David  Phelps  Sr.
|  |  /--
|  \--Rachel Jones  Clark 
|     \--
|--John  Phelps 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Margaret  Colton 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Anna Baker

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Anna  Baker 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

[4068] The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution
DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION.
page 51& 247

[p.51] John Phelps, (1756-1841), was at the battle of Rhode Island;served in the Light Dragoons and, 1781, was promoted to lieutenant of atroop of Horse. He was placed on the pension roll 1832 for service in theConnecticut line. He was born in Enfield; died in Colebrook.

More About JOHN PHELPS, LEIUT.:
Military service: Bet. 1778 - 1781, Lieut., Rev. War, Gen. Walesburg's Brigade
P&S Reference: [G346]
Residence(s): 1840, Colebrook, Connecticut

[4108] Mr. Phelps was a farmer. He first settled in East Granville, where two of his children were born, removing in 1806 to Granville, Ohio, where he died 25 Oct. 1839.
--P&S page 1392

@1 [4107] [S80]

  • @2Page: Vol 2, p 1392

@1 [3863] [S192]

  • @4Data:
    Date of Import: 7 Jun 1999

James Phelps / (--?--)

Husband: James Phelps
Born: at:
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Father: Berzillia Camerelso Phelps
Mother: Martha A. Stevenson
Wife: (--?--)
Children
Name: Marvin Phelps
Born: at:
Died: at:
Spouses:


Pedigree Chart for: James Phelps

      /--Sylvester Ira  Phelps 
   /--Albert  Phelps 
   |  \--Maria  Lathrop 
/--Berzillia Camerelso  Phelps 
|  |  /--
|  \--Nancy McClain  Shelpman 
|     \--
|--James  Phelps 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Martha A.  Stevenson 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Mary Ellis / John Tydings

Husband: Mary Ellis
Born: at:
Married: ABT 16 Jun 1705at:
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Wife: John Tydings
Born: ABT 1683at:
Died: at:
Father: Richards Tydings
Mother: Charity
Children

Pedigree Chart for: Mary Ellis

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Mary  Ellis 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: John Tydings

      /--
   /--(--?--)  Tydings 
   |  \--
/--Richards  Tydings 
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--John  Tydings 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Charity   
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Henry Grew Crosby / Mary Phelps Jacob

Husband: Henry Grew Crosby
Born: 4 Jun 1898at: Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts
Married: 9 Sep 1922at:
Died: 10 Dec 1929at:
Father:
Mother:
Sources: [12973]
Wife: Mary Phelps Jacob
Born: 20 Apr 1892at: New Rochelle, New York, USA
Died: 24 Jan 1970[5412] at: Rome, Italy
Father: William Hearns Jacob
Mother: Mary Phelps
Notes: [5413]
Sources: [5412] [5414] [5415]
Children

Pedigree Chart for: Henry Grew Crosby

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Henry Grew  Crosby 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Mary Phelps Jacob

      /--William Hearn  Jacob 
   /--Leonard  Jacobs 
   |  \--Ann  Tucker 
/--William Hearns  Jacob 
|  |  /--John Riker  Lawrence 
|  \--Emma  Lawrence 
|     \--Margarete  Quick 
|--Mary Phelps  Jacob 
|     /--Walter  Phelps 
|  /--Walter  Phelps 
|  |  \--Julia  Beach 
\--Mary  Phelps 
   |  /--Walter  Phelps 
   \--Eliza Ann  Schenk 
      \--Harriet Tilling  Hart 

[5413] The first modern brassiere to receive a patent and gain wide acceptance was a bra invented by a young New York socialite named Mary Phelps Jacob in 1910. Born on 20 April 1891 in New Rochelle, New York, "Polly" (as she nicknamed herself) was the daughter of a prominent New England family. Her ancestry included Governor Bradford, the Plymouth Colony's first governor, and Robert Fulton, developer of the steamboat.

Polly's family was not fabulously rich, but her father had been raised, as she put it, "to ride to hounds, sail boats, and lead cotillions," and he lived high. She grew up, she later said, "in a world where only good smells existed." "What I wanted," she said of her privileged childhood, "usually came to pass." A childhood of privilege included private school, dancing school, and horse riding school. She was a rather disinterested student. One commentator writes that for the most part Polly "lived her life in dreams." (Wolff).

In 1915, at age 24, Polly Jacob married Richard Rogers Peabody, son of one of the three great New England families. By the early 20th century a case could be made that the Peabodies had supplanted the Cabots and the Lodges as the most distinguished name in the area. She had for all intents and purposes arrived socially, having married into American aristocracy. But it was not to last.
From the Corset to the Brassiere

Up to this time, an unhealthy and painful device called a corset narrowed an adult women's waist to 13 or fewer inches. The corset is attributed to Catherine de Médicis, wife of King Henri II of France. She enforced a ban on thick waists at court attendance during the 1550s. For nearly 350 years, women's primary means of support was the corset, with laces and stays made of whalebone or metal.

In 1875, designer Susan Taylor Converse created a garment called the "Union Under-Flannel" from woolen fabric. The garment is different to previous items as it has no-bones, eyelets, laces or pulleys. The garment was patented by manufacturers George Frost and George Phelps, but never gained much attention.

In 1889, French-born corset-maker Herminie Cadolle invented a two-part undergarment. The top half of her 1889 invention was "designed to sustain the bosom and supported by the shoulders." (The bottom half was a corset that covered only the waist and rear.) She called it the 'Well-Being' or 'Bien-être'. Introduced in Paris, the Bien-être resembled a Victorian bikini. But Cadolle's far-sighted design seems to have been kept a close secret among her select customers.

Later in 1893, Marie Tucek patented the first brassiere. Her device included separate pockets for the breasts, straps that went over the shoulder which were fastened by hook-and-eye closures. It looked very much like modern bras today, but Marie apparently failed to successfully market the patent.

In 1910, Polly Jacob had just purchased a sheer evening gown for one of her social events. At that time, the only acceptable undergarment was a corset stiffened with whalebone. Polly found that the whalebones visibly poked out around the plunging neckline and under the sheer fabric. Dissatisfied with this arrangement, she worked with her maid to stitch two silk handkerchiefs together with some pink ribbon and cord.

Polly's new undergarment complimented the new fashions introduced at the time. Family and friends almost immediately asked Polly to create brassieres for them, too. One day, she received a request for one of her contraptions from a stranger, who offered a dollar for her efforts. She knew then that this could become a viable business. The corset's reign was beginning to topple.

Polly was the first to patent an undergarment named 'Brassiere' derived from the old French word for 'upper arm'.

On November 3, 1914, the U.S. Patent Office issued a patent for the 'Backless Brassiere'. Her patent was for a device that was lightweight, soft and separated the breasts naturally. Polly christened her business with the name Caresse Crosby. While a definite improvement, her brassiere did not offer breasts a lot of support, and were more flattening than flattering. In fact, the breast flattening style was popularized by the Flapper look during the Roaring Twenties. With the popularity of actresses like Marilyn Monroe and Jane Russell, the present breast-enhancing style gained popularity during the thirties and forties.

Running a business either was not enjoyable to Polly or she failed to properly market the product, for she soon sold the brassiere patent to the Warner Brothers Corset Company in Bridgeport, Connecticut, for $1,500 (or over $25,600 in today's money). Shortly afterwards, in 1917, the U.S. War Industries Board asked women to stop buying corsets to free up metal for war production. This step liberated some 28,000 tons of metal, enough to build two battleships.

It has been said that the bra took off the way it did in large part because of World War I. The Great War shook up gender roles, putting many women to work in factories and uniforms for the first time. Women needed practical, comfortable undergarments. Warner went on to earn more than fifteen million dollars from the bra patent over the next thirty years.

During the flat-chested Flapper era in the 1920's, a Russian immigrant named Ida Rosenthal noticed that a bra that fit one woman did not fit another woman of the same bra size. With the help of her husband William, they founded Maidenform. Ida was responsible for grouping women into bust size categories (cup sizes) and developed bras for every stage of life (puberty to maturity).

In the 1930s, Warner produces the first popular all-elastic bra, which shows off a woman's curves.
Polly Divorces Richard Peabody and Remarries

After Polly sold her brassiere patent, she had two children: a son, William Jacob in 1916, and a daughter, Polly ("Poleen") the following year. Her husband Richard Peabody was a well-educated but undirected man and a reluctant father. She found he had only three real interests, all acquired at Harvard: to play, to drink, and to turn out, at any hour, to chase fire engines. He would soon suffer the personal consequences of his WWI experiences and became an alcoholic. Polly's life was difficult during the war years and when her husband returned home, significantly changed, her life soon changed abruptly too.

The catalyst for Polly Peabody's transformation was her introduction and eventual marriage to Harry Grew Crosby, a wealthy scion of a socially prominent Boston family and another veteran and victim of the recent war. Harry attended private schools and until age 19 and he appeared to be well on the path to a comfortable life as a member of the upper middle class. His experiences in World War I changed everything.

In the pattern of other sons of the elite from New England, he volunteered for the American Field Service Ambulance Corps. He served in the Second Battle of Verdun. After the Battle of Orme, his section (the 29th, attached to the 120th French Division) was cited for bravery, and in 1919 Crosby was awarded the Croix de Guerre.

While completing school after WWI, Harry met Polly. She was 28, six years older than Harry, with two small children. By some accounts, Harry fell in love with Mrs. Peabody in about two hours. He confessed his love for her in the Tunnel of Love at the amusement park. Two weeks later they made love. Their scandalous courtship was the gossip of blue-blood Boston. Polly finally divorced Richard Peabody who was in and out of sanitariums fighting his alcohol abuse, and on September 9, 1922 Harry and Polly were married. Two days later they moved to France to join other American expatriates, probably much to the relief of their respective families. Harry at first worked for his famous uncle, American capitalist J.P. Morgan, who was also Harry's godfather, in a job arranged for him in a Paris bank. But he soon tired of work.

Polly and Harry purchased a race horse and then two more. They traveled to North Africa where it is reported they first smoked opium, a habit to which they would return again and again. From 1922 to 1925, the Crosbys led the life of the rich expatriates. They lived a glamorous and luxurious lifestyle that included an "open marriage," a mutual suicide pact, and cremation instructions they carried with them. Their lifestyle was financed by selling the bonds and stocks whose dividends were previously the basis of Harry's income.

Founded the Black Sun Press

After publishing two volumes that they were unhappy with, the Crosbys found a master printer named Roger Lescaret whose previous work had been largely funeral notices. He printed Harry's poems in a fine edition. Harry and Caresse were very happy with the book, Red Skeletons. It contained illustrations by their friend Alastair (Hans Henning von Voight). The decided to found a press, first called éditions Narcisse— after their black whippet, Narcisse Noir. It was created to publish its founders’ attempts at verse in beautifully bound, hand-set books.

By the time the name of the press was changed in mid-1928 to the Black Sun Press, the careers of both the Caresse and Harry Crosby were in high gear. The Black Sun Press is famous for having published lavishly bound, typographically impeccable versions of unusual books, including The Fall of the House of Usher, their Hindu Love Book, and letters by Henry James to Walter Berry, Harry's cousin. As their literary tastes matured, they began to publish the works of their Parisian literary friends. This included D. H. Lawrence's The Sun and Escaped Cock (sometimes reprinted under the title The Man Who Died); James Joyce's Tales Told of Shem and Shaun (work — later incorporated into Finnegans Wake; and short stories by Kay Boyle. In 1929, their best year, they published fourteen works by James Joyce, Ernest Hemingway and Ezra Pound, among others. Caresse published her own book of poetry, Crosses of Gold.

In 1928, however, Harry Crosby met Josephine Noyes Rotch, whom he would call the "Youngest Princess of the Sun" and the "Fire Princess." She was descended from a family that first settled in Provincetown on Cape Cod in 1690. Josephine would inspire Crosby's next collection of poems called Transit of Venus. Miss Rotch was twenty, ten years younger than Harry. The two fell in love. In a letter to his mother, dated July 24, 1928, Crosby wrote:

I am having an affair with a girl I met (not introduced) at the Lido. She is twenty and has charm and is called Josephine. I like girls when they are very young before they have any minds.

Josephine and Harry had an ongoing affair until she married, when it ceased. Then Josephine Bigelow's new husband got busy with school, and Josephine contacted Harry again. Their affair rekindled, they traveled to Detroit and checked into an expensive, $12 a day hotel as husband and wife. For four days they took meals in their room, smoked opium, battled, and made love.

On December 7, 1929, the lovers returned to New York where they agreed that Josephine should return to Boston to her husband. But on December 9 she had delivered a 36-line poem to Crosby who was staying with Caresse at the Savoy-Plaza Hotel. The last line of the poem is:

Death is our marriage.

On December 9, Harry Crosby made the following entry into his notebook:

One is not in love unless one desires to die with one's beloved. There is only one happiness it is to love and to be loved.

These are Crosby's very last entries into his journal. On December 10, 1929, in an apparent suicide pact, Harry was found in bed with a .25 caliber bullet hole in his right temple next to Josephine, who had a matching hole in her left temple. Harry was still clutching the pistol in one hand, Josephine in the other. Harry apparently shot Josephine and then, according to the coroner, several hours later, he shot himself.

After Harry Crosby's suicide, Caresse continued her writing and publishing work at Black Sun. She also established Crosby Continental Editions, a book company that published paperback books by Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Dorothy Parker, among others.

In 1937, at age 47, she married Selbert Young, a football player nearly twenty years her junior. She bought and renovated Hampton Manor, a ruined but splendid home in Bowling Green, Virginia. She opened an art gallery in Washington D.C. and started Portfolio, a magazine about art and literature. She also was politically active and founded the organization Women Against War. She later bought a castle north of Rome that gave her the title of Principessa, and later mountain-top retreats in Cyprus and Delphi. Thus she had homes in Bowling Green, Virginia, in Washington, D.C., a sprawling apartment at 137 East Fifty-Fourth Street in New York City, as well as her residences in Europe.

Henry Miller and Opus Pistorum

In Paris during 1933, Caresse had met Henry Miller. When he returned to the U.S. in 1940, he confessed to Caresse his lack of success in getting his work published. Miller's autobiographical book Tropic of Cancer was banned in the U.S. as pornographic, and he could get no other work published. She invited him to take a room in her New York apartment where she infrequently lived, which he accepted, though she did not provide him with money.

Desperate for cash, Miller fell to churning out pornography on commission for an Oklahoma oil baron, but after two 100-page stories that brought him $200, he could do no more. Now he wanted to tour the United States by car and write about it. He got a $750 advance, and persuaded the oil man's agent to advance him another $200. He was preparing to leave on the trip but still have not provided the work promised. He thought then of Caresse Crosby. She was already pitching in ideas and pieces of writing to Anaïs Nin's New York City smut club for fun, not money. Caresse was facile and clever, wrote easily and quickly, with little effort.

Caresse accepted Henry's proposal. She wrote the title given her by Henry Miller "Opus Pistorum" at the top, and started right in. Henry left for his car tour of America. Caresse churned out 200 pages and the collector's agent asked for more.

Caresse's smut was just what the oil man wanted-no literary aspirations-just plain sex. In Caresse the agent had found the basic pornographic Henry Miller. Caresse churned out another 200 pages, spending her time writing while her husband, Bert Young, fell into a drunken stupor every night.

In her diary, Anaïs Nin observed that everyone who wrote pornography with her wrote out of a self that was opposite to her or his identity, but identical with his desire. Polly or Caresse experienced years of social constraints imposed by her upper-class association in New York. She had a doomed and troublesome romanticism with Harry Crosby. She participated in a decade or more of intellectual lovers in Paris during the 1920s. Perhaps it was a release for Caresse just to take love as casual lust and let it go at that.

In 1950 Caresse divorced Bert Young and moved to Italy where she planned to create an artists colony. She published an autobiography in 1953 called The Passionate Years. Caresse died in relative obscurity in 1970, but she lived long enough to see the bra go through a number of transformations and become immensely popular all over the world.

All kinds of bras have been created for every conceivable purpose, to do all the things that corsets have done in previous generations: minimize, uplift, show cleavage, maximize, or plain show off. Training bras for newly developing young girls seem like an oxymoron, and in reality aren't really meant for support as much as for camouflage. Jogging or sports bras are a more recent innovation for the woman who wants to work out, and some are meant to be worn as outerwear. Statistics show the average American woman today owns six bras. Out of those six, one of is a strapless bra and one is a color other than white.

Despite all of the many advances and improvements in brassieres, perhaps a Surgeon General's warning is still required. In 1994, Berbel Zumner, age 23, was walking through a park in Vienna. Berbel had large breasts and wore a brassiere with underwire support to support her ample frame. She was killed when lightening struck her brassiere.

A movie about Harry and Caresse is said to be in development by Fine Line Features. Only a director has been attached to the project, and no completion date has been set.

By Brian Phelps
Licensed for other's use under the GNU Free Documentation License (GNU FDL or simply GFDL).

References and Sources

American Heritage of Invention & Technology, Spring 1997, Volume 12/Number 4

Daily Record (Scotland) 21 October 1994

Mary Phelps Jacob Inventor of the Week Archive November 2001 (December 2003)

"Caresse Crosby, Infield." Cosmic Baseball Association, 1998 (December 2003)

"The Brassiere." Useless Information. (December 2003)

Bra sizes Sizes.com July 11, 2001 (June 2004)

Edward Germain, Editor, Harry Crosby, Shadows of the Sun: The Diaries of Harry Crosby. Santa Barbara, California: Black Sparrow Press. 1977.

Geoffrey Wolff, Black Sun. Random House: New York. 1976.

Shelley Cox, "Introduction: The Black Sun Press," ICarbS 3:2 (1977), 3-4.

Ethlie Ann Vare and Greg Ptacek. Patently Female (John Wiley, 2002) p. 134-139.

Caresse Crosby The Passionate Years (Ecco Press).

A Brief History Of The Nipple, by Amil Niazi. November 15, 2005 (December 21, 2005)

@1 [12973] [S422]

@1 [5412] [S423]

@1 [5414] [S422]

@1 [5415] [S80]

Quincy Adams / Nancy Cooper

Husband: Quincy Adams
Born: at: 
Died:at: 
Father:  at: 
Mother:  at: 
Wife: Nancy Cooper
Born: at: 
Died:at: 
Father:  at: 
Mother:  at: 
Children

Pedigree Chart for: Quincy Adams

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Quincy  Adams 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Nancy Cooper

      /--William Andrew  Cooper 
   /--Collier Thomas  Cooper 
   |  \--Sara 'Sallie' Ensign  Phelps 
/--Collier Thomas  Cooper  Jr
|  |  /--
|  \--Geneva Elizabeth  Winkle 
|     \--
|--Nancy  Cooper 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Annie Clair  Drewry 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

[5581] This person is presumed living.

[5579] This person is presumed living.

Eugene Gross Day I / Esther Whipple

Husband: Eugene Gross Day I
Born: 11 Jul 1892at:
Married: at:  
Died: 2 Aug 1967at:
Father: George Edward Day
Mother: Leighla Gross
Sources: [11013]
Wife: Esther Whipple
Born: 28 Oct 1902at:
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Children
Name: Eugene Gross Day II [10367] [10368]
Born: 12 Dec 1927[10367] at:
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Suzanne Day
Born: 5 Nov 1928at:
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Katherine E. 'Kitsie' Day [10797]
Born: at:
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Spouses:


Pedigree Chart for: Eugene Gross Day I

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--George Edward  Day 
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Eugene Gross  Day  I
|     /--Alba  Gross  Rev.
|  /--Eugene L.  Gross 
|  |  \--Alethea  Smith 
\--Leighla  Gross 
   |  /--Alba  Gross  Rev.
   \--Susan Louise  Zimmerman 
      \--Susan Philenia  Seely 

Pedigree Chart for: Esther Whipple

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Esther  Whipple 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

[10797] This person is presumed living.

@1 [11013] [S300]

@1 [10367] [S300]

@1 [10368] [S300]

Schute / Noreen Vilate Morgan

Husband: Schute
Born: at:
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Wife: Noreen Vilate Morgan
Born: 15 Mar 1920at: Hunt, Apache, Arizona
Died: 9 Mar 2000at:
Father: Mathias Cowley Morgan
Mother: Mildred Pearce
Children

Pedigree Chart for: Schute

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|-- Schute 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Noreen Vilate Morgan

      /--Garrard  Morgan 
   /--John Hamilton  Morgan 
   |  \--Eliza Ann  Hamilton 
/--Mathias Cowley  Morgan 
|  |  /--Samuel  Linton 
|  \--Mary Ann  Linton 
|     \--Ellen  Sutton 
|--Noreen Vilate  Morgan 
|     /--James  Pearce 
|  /--James William  Pearce 
|  |  \--Mary Jane  Meeks 
\--Mildred  Pearce 
   |  /--James  Pearce 
   \--Vilate  Oakley 
      \--Louisa  Jones 

Eric Scholden / Rachelle Elise Morgan

Husband: Eric Scholden
Born: at:
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Wife: Rachelle Elise Morgan
Born: at:
Died: at:
Father: Bruce Lowell Morgan Jr.
Mother: Laura Ann Nelson
Children
Name: Ariana Scholden
Born: at:
Died: at:
Spouses:


Pedigree Chart for: Eric Scholden

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Eric  Scholden 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Rachelle Elise Morgan

      /--Mathias Cowley  Morgan 
   /--Bruce Lowell  Morgan 
   |  \--Mildred  Pearce 
/--Bruce Lowell  Morgan  Jr.
|  |  /--Josiah Howe  Loveland  Jr.
|  \--Leah  Loveland 
|     \--Nancy Afton  Tolman 
|--Rachelle Elise  Morgan 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Laura Ann  Nelson 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Comte Albert de Mun / Poleen Wheatland Peabody

Husband: Comte Albert de Mun
Born: at:
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Wife: Poleen Wheatland Peabody
Born: 1917at:
Died: 31 Dec 2009at:
Father: Richard Rogers Peabody
Mother: Mary Phelps Jacob
Children
Name: Lorraine Marie de Mun [7733]
Born: at:
Died: at:
Spouses:


Pedigree Chart for: Comte Albert de Mun

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Comte Albert  de Mun 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Poleen Wheatland Peabody

      /--
   /--Jacob C. R.  Peabody 
   |  \--
/--Richard Rogers  Peabody 
|  |  /--
|  \--D. W.  Florence 
|     \--
|--Poleen Wheatland  Peabody 
|     /--Leonard  Jacobs 
|  /--William Hearns  Jacob 
|  |  \--Emma  Lawrence 
\--Mary Phelps  Jacob 
   |  /--Leonard  Jacobs 
   \--Mary  Phelps 
      \--Eliza Ann  Schenk 

[7733] This person is presumed living.

William Henry Clagett / Mary Adele Clare

Husband: William Henry Clagett
Born: 1827at:
Married: at:  
Died: 1892at: Washington, D.C., USA
Father: Darius Clagett
Mother: Providence Dorsey Brice
Wife: Mary Adele Clare
Born: at:
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Children
Name: Maurice Joseph Clagett
Born: at:
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Spouses: Emma Louise Noble


Pedigree Chart for: William Henry Clagett

      /--John  Clagett 
   /--Walter  Clagett 
   |  \--Sarah 'Sary'  Magruder 
/--Darius  Clagett 
|  |  /--
|  \--Martha  Williams 
|     \--
|--William Henry  Clagett 
|     /--
|  /--John  Brice  IV
|  |  \--
\--Providence Dorsey  Brice 
   |  /--
   \--Sarah  Lane 
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Mary Adele Clare

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Mary Adele  Clare 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Ken Goerke / Lenore Bremser

Husband: Ken Goerke
Born: 5 Apr 1915[7988] at:
Married: 1 Jun 1938at:
Died: 18 Sep 1997[7989] at:
Father:
Mother:
Sources: [7988] [7989] [7990]
Wife: Lenore Bremser
Born: 16 Mar 1913[8047] at:
Died: at:
Father: John Nicolaus Bremser
Mother: Susanna Berres
Sources: [8047] [8048]
Children

Pedigree Chart for: Ken Goerke

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Ken  Goerke 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Lenore Bremser

      /--Johann Heinrich 'Henry' Adam  Bremser 
   /--Charles  Bremser  Sr.
   |  \--Philippina  Schupp 
/--John Nicolaus  Bremser 
|  |  /--
|  \--Marie  Schneider 
|     \--
|--Lenore  Bremser 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Susanna  Berres 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

@1 [14569] [S189]

  • @4Data:
    Importdatum: 21 Nov 2001

@1 [7988] [S189]

  • @4Data:
    Importdatum: 21 Nov 2001

@1 [7989] [S189]

  • @4Data:
    Importdatum: 21 Nov 2001

@1 [7990] [S189]

  • @4Data:
    Importdatum: 21 Nov 2001

@1 [8047] [S189]

  • @4Data:
    Importdatum: 21 Nov 2001

@1 [8048] [S189]

  • @4Data:
    Importdatum: 21 Nov 2001

(--?--) / (--?--)

Husband: (--?--)
Wife: (--?--)
Children
Name: Living Tune
Born: at:
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Spouses: Living Stephens


Judson Adonirum Tolman Sr. / Mary Reeves

Husband: Judson Adonirum Tolman Sr.
Born: 14 Jul 1826at: Hope,Lincoln,Maine
Married: 20 Dec 1852at: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
Died: 6 Jul 1916at: Bountiful, Davis, Utah, United States
Father: Nathan Tolman
Mother: Sarah Hewett
Notes: [10143]
Sources: [10144]
Wife: Mary Reeves
Born: 6 Aug 1820at: Newark, Essex, New Jersey, United States
Died: 1 Mar 1885at: Park Valley, Box Elder, Utah, United States
Father:
Mother:
Notes: [11193]
Children

Pedigree Chart for: Judson Adonirum Tolman Sr.

      /--William  Tolman 
   /--Reuben  Tolman 
   |  \--Elizabeth (Betty)  Snow 
/--Nathan  Tolman 
|  |  /--John  McCarter 
|  \--Margaret  McCarter 
|     \--Martha   
|--Judson Adonirum  Tolman  Sr.
|     /--John  Hewett Hewitt 
|  /--William  Hewitt 
|  |  \-- Orreon 
\--Sarah  Hewett 
   |  /--John  Hewett Hewitt 
   \--Sarah  King 
      \--Sarah  Taylor 

Pedigree Chart for: Mary Reeves

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Mary  Reeves 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

[10143] Judson's middle name is listed also as Adnyrum, Adoniran, and J. A. Senior. It is believed he took it upon himself as an adult. Sources for this family are kept in the records of the Thomas Tolman Family Organization, 2937 South Orchard Dr., Bountiful, Utah 84010. They are extensive, thus not listed here.
See also the book "Judson Tolman; Pioneer, Lumberman, Patriarch," written by E. Dennis Tolman, published in 1995 by Family History Publishers, 845 South Main Street, Bountiful, Utah 84010.

[11193] Sealed to Judson A. Tolman 20 Dec 1852 at President's Office, cancelled
26 Jan 1857.

@1 [10144] [S44]

Orson Clinton Loveland / Mary Isabelle Gardner

Husband: Orson Clinton Loveland
Born: 25 Jun 1855at: Bountiful, Davis, Utah, United States
Married: 6 Mar 1879at: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
Died: 30 Jan 1924at: Honeyville, Box Elder, Utah, USA
Father: Chester Loveland
Mother: Fannie Amy Call
Notes: [10427]
Sources: [10428]
Wife: Mary Isabelle Gardner
Born: at:
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Children

Pedigree Chart for: Orson Clinton Loveland

      /--Levi  Loveland 
   /--Chauncey  Loveland 
   |  \--Esther  Hills 
/--Chester  Loveland 
|  |  /--Joseph   Graham 
|  \--Nancy  Graham 
|     \--Nancy  Sanderson 
|--Orson Clinton  Loveland 
|     /--Joseph  Call 
|  /--Cyril  Call 
|  |  \--Mary  Sanderson 
\--Fannie Amy  Call 
   |  /--Joseph  Call 
   \--Sally (or Sarah)  Tiffany 
      \--Rebecca  Ellis 

Pedigree Chart for: Mary Isabelle Gardner

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Mary Isabelle  Gardner 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

[10427] Orson additional wife listed as Laura Eliza Neely Hunsaker.

@1 [10428] [S44]

George M. Avery / Seraphina Princess Mary Phelps

Husband: George M. Avery
Born: 2 Dec 1802[10859] [10860] [10861] at: New Lebanon, Columbia County, Ny
Married: 24 Jan 1839at: Knox County, Illinois, USA
Died: 31 Dec 1886at: prb Galesburg, Knox Cty, Illinois
Father: William Thomas Avery
Mother: Phebe Throop
Notes: [10863]
Sources: [10859] [10860] [10861] [10862] [10864] [10865]
Wife: Seraphina Princess Mary Phelps
Born: 19 Jan 1815[10939] [10940] at: prb Westfield, Hampden Co., Massachusetts, USA
Died: 12 Dec 1891at: prb Galesburg, Knox Cty, Illinois
Father: Aaron Noble Phelps
Mother: Clarissa Root
Notes: [10941]
Children
Name: Robert Hanneman Avery [10345] [10343] [10344] [10346]
Born: 16 Jan 1840[10343] at: Galesburg, Knox, Illinois, United States
Married: at:  
Died: 13 Sep 1892[10344] at: Peoria, Illinois
Spouses: Sarah Payson Ayers

Name: John Thomas Avery [10977]
Born: 25 Dec 1841at: Galesburg, Knox, Illinois, United States
Married: at:  
Died: 8 Nov 1905[10977] at: Galesburg, Knox, Illinois, United States
Spouses: Flora Olmsted

Name: Mary Avery [10653]
Born: 13 Aug 1844[10653] at: Galesburg, Knox, Illinois, United States
Married: at:  
Died: 1931at:
Spouses: William R. Butcher

Name: Cyrus Minor Avery [10744] [10742] [10743]
Born: 19 Jun 1846at: May 29, 1899
Married: at:  
Died: 15 Sep 1905[10742] at: Galesburg, Knox, Illinois, United States
Spouses: Minnie Evalena Bartholemew

Name: Phebe Throop Avery [11196] [11197]
Born: 21 Dec 1848at: Galesburg, Knox, Illinois, United States
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: George Avery [10539] [10540]
Born: 9 Apr 1854at:
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Frederick Authur Avery [10875]
Born: 15 Oct 1857at: Galesburg, Illinois
Died: 25 Nov 1860at:
Spouses:


Pedigree Chart for: George M. Avery

      /--Abraham  Avery 
   /--Nathan  Avery 
   |  \--Jane  Hill 
/--William Thomas  Avery 
|  |  /--
|  \--Deborah  Thomas 
|     \--
|--George M.  Avery 
|     /--
|  /--William  Throop 
|  |  \--
\--Phebe  Throop 
   |  /--
   \--Prudence  Hyde 
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Seraphina Princess Mary Phelps

      /--Aaron  Phelps 
   /--Aaron  Phelps  Jr.
   |  \--Rachel  Bagg 
/--Aaron Noble  Phelps 
|  |  /--Moses  Noble 
|  \--Mary  Noble 
|     \--Mary  Grant 
|--Seraphina Princess Mary  Phelps 
|     /--Thomas  Root 
|  /--Thomas  Root  Jr.
|  |  \--Abigail  Collins 
\--Clarissa  Root 
   |  /--Thomas  Root 
   \--Princess  Noble 
      \--Hannah  Sacket 

[10863] "George Avery is descended from Christopher Avery, the ancestral line being traced down through James, Thomas, Abraham, Nathan, William and to George Avery. George Avery was the founder of the family in the west, establishing his home in Galesburg in 1837. There he built the second house in what was then known as Log City. There he built the second house in what was then known as Log City, in the midst of a tract that came to be called the Avery farm. He married Saraphena Princess Mary Phelps, who came to the west with her brother and mother, settling in Knoxville, Illinois, where she married Mr. Avery. For many years Mr. Avery continued to engage in general farming but at length retired and took up his abode within the limits of Galesburg, living on North Cherry street. There the fruits of his former toil supplied him with all of the necessities and many of the comforts of life up to the time of his death, which occurred on the first of January, 1884. His wife also died at the Cherry street home."

-- Rice, James Montgomery, "Peoria City and County, Illinois: A Record of Settlement, Organization, Progress and Achievement." S.J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1912. p. 182.

[10941] Seraphina came to Knox County "with her mother [Clarissa Root] in 1836, her father having died six years before. They settled in what is now Galesburg, where the mother died in 1856."

-- History of Knox County, p. 840

Mr. Avery's marriage was celebrated Jan. 24, 1839, in Knox County, when he was united in holy matrimonial bonds with Miss Seraphina Princess Mary Phelps, a native of Massachusetts. She was the daughter of Col. Aaron N. and Clarissa (Root) Phelps, natives of Westfield, Mass. The Phelps family is one of the oldest in New England. Two brothers landed in America May 30, 1630, coming from England on the ship "Mary and John", commanded by Capt. Squibb. Aaron N. Phelps was a colonel in the War of 1812. Mrs. Avery was born Jan. 19, 1815 and was the eldest of a family of three children. The others, who are deceased, were Mrs. Sybelana Kilbourn and Royal A. N. Mrs. Avery came to this county in 1836 with her mother, her father having died six years before. They settled in what is now Galesburg, where the mother died in 1856.

Mr. and Mrs. Avery have had born to them seven children, as follows: Robert H., President of the Avery Corn-Planter Company of Peoria; John T. a farmer of Rio Township, this county; Mary, now Mrs. Rev. William R. Butcher of Wataga; Cyrus M. of Avery & Co. of Peoria; Phebe T. now living at home; and George, a farmer of Kansas. Fredrick Arthur died when about three years old. Robert H., the eldest son, married Miss Sarah P. Ayers; they are the parents of five children—Minnie E., Fredrick A., Sadie T., Cornelia, and Ellen K. Robert enlisted in Co. A, 77th IL Vol. Inf. in 1862, and served until the close of the war. He was taken prisoner and placed in Andersonville prison, where he remained for about eight months. He is the inventor of the Avery Corn-Planter, as well as other useful implements, and owns a controlling interest in the factory at Peoria. John T. took to wife Mrs. Flora Olmsted. Mary became the wife of Rev. William R. Butcher, and they have five children—Harry E., Mary Z., Etha, William, and Irene. Cyrus M. married Miss Minnie E. Bartholomew, and to them have been born three children—Elvira P., George L, and Grace O. George married Miss Ada Wood, and they are the parents of three children; the name of the only one living is Edith L. Cyrus M., who is now Secretary of the Avery Corn-Planter Company, graduated from Knox College, standing No. 1 in his class.

Mr. and Mrs. Avery are consistent, sympathetic Christians, and are connected by profession of faith with the First Church of Christ. Mr. Avery is a stanch Republican and Prohibitionist.

--1886 Portrait & Biographical Album of Knox Co., IL.

[10345] Robert enlisted in Co. A, 77th Ill. Vol Inf., in 1862, and served until the close of the war. He was taken prisoner and placed in Andersonville prison, where he remained for about eight months. He is President of the Avery Corn-Planter Company of Peoria, Ill. [and] the inventor of the Avery Corn-Planter, as well as other useful implements, and owns a controlling interest in the factory at Peoria.

-- History of Knox County, p 840

Union soldier Robert H. Avery of Galesburg, Ill., survived confinement in the infamous Confederate military prison at Andersonville, Ga., where 13,000 of his fellow prisoners died. One of the ways he kept his wits about him was by sketching a corn planter of his own design.

The detailed sketch of this planter eventually became the basis of the Avery Co. of Peoria, Ill., and half a century later, the firm was calling itself "The Largest Tractor Company in the World," employing 2,600 men and producing eight different tractors, as well as motor cultivators, trucks,

It is peculiarly refreshing, in these days of defections, when names that once were regarded as synonyms of commercial honor, have become disgraced or tainted with suspicion, to turn to those who have closed their earthly account, leaving a record unassailed and unassailable. They restore our waning confidence in men, and encourage us still to strive after legitimate success, which as they have shown is really attainable. Among these none have left a brighter record than Robert H. Avery, founder of the immense business which is now the Avery Company of Peoria.

Peoria has been remarkable for many years for the extent and rapid development of its manufacturing industries, especially along the line of agricultural implements. Peoria is recognized today as the center for this industry in the middle west, and the rich farm regions around the city owe much of their growth and development to the implements manufactured there, for tilling the soil and harvesting the crops.

The Avery Company today is the largest manufacturer of agricultural implements in the city, and it owes its success to the business qualities and strict integrity of its founder, Robert H. Avery. A good portion of the history of our country is preserved in the biographies of leading and active men who have borne an important part in the various enterprises of their time. The characters and good deeds of good men should be sacredly preserved, not only for the happiness and satisfaction which a record of them will give to all those immediately related to them, and their posterity in after generations, but also for the good example which the lives of such men, furnish to the young of our land, to follow in their footsteps, and thus further advance the true interests of our country.

Robert H. Avery was born in Galesburg, Knox county, Illinois, January 21, 1840. He grew up on a farm, familiar from youth with all the needs and wants of the farmer. He was educated in the common schools of his home town, and had barely completed his education when the Civil war called him, as it did so many of the young men of his time to fight for the preservation of the Union. He served honorably for three years. Eight months of his service was spent in Andersonville prison. The long days, utterly without work, offered ample opportunities for his active mind to devise and invent. The result of the eight months' imprisonment was the plan of his first farm tool - a cultivator. He completed his invention as far as he could without any implements whatever. He carried the design from Andersonville, and upon his release built the completed implement, and laid the foundation of the magnificent business of today.

When the war was over, Robert Avery returned to the farm, and with the aid of his brother Cyrus M. Avery, built the perfected tool, which he called "The Avery Cultivator." This lead at once to other farm implements, a stalk-cutter and planter, both of which he named after himself, and which are to this day in extensive use. Robert and Cyrus Avery entered into partnership and conducted a small business in Galesburg. This proved so prosperous, that in 1882, the brothers removed their small establishment to Peoria. The following year the partnership was incorporated under the name of the Avery Planter Company, w1th a capital stock of two hundred thousand dollars, with Robert H. Avery as its president, an office which he held until his death in 1892. During the ten years of his life in Peoria, Mr. Avery saw his business increase from a little plant in a one-story frame building, to a magnificent institution employing over one hundred and fifty men and with an immense output of cultivators, corn planters, stackers, threshing machines, check-rowers, etc. Even this, however, represented only the beginnings of the growth of the Avery Company. Robert Avery was not destined to see the consummation of his labors.

In 1899, seven years after his death the company was reincorporated, the capital stock increased to six hundred thousand dollars, and the name changed to The Avery Manufacturing Company. It was reorganized in 1907 under the name of the Avery Company, and its capital stock still further increased to two million five hundred thousand dollars. Magnificent additions have been made, a whole village has grown up around it, automobile implements have been added to the output, the working force has tripled, and the name of Avery Company has grown more honored with the passing years.

This magnificent success rests on the broad foundation of Robert H. A very 's character and attainments. He was a man of marked capacity and decided character, and of the most undoubted integrity. He was modest and unassuming in his deportment, and retiring in his habits, but in whatever position he was placed he was emphatic and decided. He was possessed of business acumen, clear insight and ability to manage, control and direct. Of impressive personality, he possessed throughout his life such courage, self-assertion and mental as well as moral force as are seldom met with in any calling. He was a rare leader of men, and seldom were his judgments faulty. Frauds and pretenders of every sort he would not tolerate. He never forsook a friend and honor and honesty were his mottoes for all living. He always carried a genial humor that drew people to him. The most marked of all his characteristics was his marvelous force.

The memory of his upright life remains as a blessed benediction to those who were his associates. He was one of those characters whom God has not permitted to live in vain and for naught. From his life may be deduced a moral of great value, and from it may be formed a model by which mothers may well strive to form the characters of their sons.

-- Rice, James Montgomery, "Peoria City and County, Illinois: A Record of Settlement, Organization, Progress and Achievement." S.J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1912. p. 182.

[10744] Co-founder with brother Robert of Avery & Co. in Peoria. He also owned an interest in Frost Manufacturing Company. The Spiral-knife Stalk-cutter was invented by Robert H. & Cyrus M. Avery.

Rice, James Montgomery. "Peoria City and County, Illinois: A Record of Settlement, Organization, Progress and Achievement" , S.J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1912 Original from the New York Public Library.

In the city of Galesburg, where many years of his life were passed, Cyrus Minor Avery was widely known and his many attractive social qualities and admirable characteristics gained for him the friendship and kindly regard of all with whom he came in contact. He was one of Galesburg's native sons, his birth having here occurred on the 19th of June, 1846, when the city was but a small town and outlying districts of the state were largely undeveloped and unimproved. His parents were George and Saraphena Princess Mary (Phelps) Avery, both natives of the state of New York. The father was born in New Lebanon and was a representative in the seventh generation of a family that traces its ancestry back to Christopher Avery, the line coming down through James, Thomas, Abraham, Nathan and William Thomas to George. As a young man the last named came to the west, arriving in Galesburg in 1837. Here he built the second house in what was then known as Log City. Later the place of his abode, now on West Main street, came to be called the Avery farm. There he followed general agricultural pursuits at a time when the most fore- sighted could not have dreamed that his place would one day be near the very heart of the enterprising city. The lady whom he afterward made his wife came to the west with her brother and mother, settling in Knoxville, where they were married. For many years Mr. Avery continued to engage in general farming but at length retired and took up his abode within the limits of Galesburg, living on North Cherry street. There the fruits of his former toil supplied him with the necessities and comforts of life up to the time of his death, which occurred on the ist of January, 1884. His wife also died at the Cherry street home. They were members of the First Congregational church, in the work of which they took active and helpful part, Mr. Avery serving as deacon for many years. His political indorsement was given to the republican party. In the family were six children: Robert H., who died September 13, 1892; Mary, the wife of W. R. Butcher, living at Roodhouse. Illinois; John T., who died August n, 1905, at Galesburg; Cyrus M. ; Phoebe T., who is now living in Biloxi, 'Mississippi ; and George, also of Biloxi.

Cyrus M. Avery was educated in the public schools of Galesburg and in Knox College, where he completed his course with the class of 1868. He worked with his father on the farm for a time and was early trained to habits of industry and diligence. He afterward engaged in the manufacturing business and made for himself a creditable position in trade circles in his native city. Early in the '705 he joined his brother, Robert Hanneman Avery, in the establishment of a plant for the manufacture of agricultural implements in Galesburg. The brother had been a soldier in the Civil War, was captured and was held as a prisoner at Andersonville, where he spent many otherwise idle hours in drawing in the sand of the prison yard designs of agricultural implements which he began to make soon after his release, the first being a stalk cutter and a corn planter. When the plans of the brothers were perfected for the conduct of an agricultural implement manufactory, they began business under the style of R. H. & C. M. Avery, operating their plant at Galesburg until 1882, when they went to Peoria and made arrangements for removing their factory to the latter city. There the enterprise was developed into a very large corporation known as the Avery Company. In 1883, after the removal of the business to Peoria, the Avery Planter Company was organized with a capital of two hundred thousand dollars. Ten years later the authorized capital was incresed to three hundred thousand dollars, and in 1900 the name was changed to the Avery Manufacturing Company, at which time the capital stock was increased to one million dollars. The business continued to grow and is now capitalized for two million, five hundred thousand dollars. The plant is one of the most extensive and prominent productive industries of Peoria, with business connections that reach out to all parts of the world. C. M. Avery continued active in the management and control of the interests at Peoria until 1902, when he returned to his native city and erected here a large, comfortable and attractive modern residence. The remainder of his life was divided between the two cities of Galesburg and Peoria; although he regarded the former as his home.

It was here on the 4th of October, 1877, that Mr. Avery was united in marriage to Miss Minnie Evalena Bartholomew, who was born at Elmwood, Illinois, February 25, 1856, and is a daughter of Luzerne and Sarah Elvira (Payne) Bartholomew. They became the parents of five children : Elvira Princess, born September 25, 1878; George Luzerne, September 12, 1879; Grace Ophelia, Octoher her 8, 1883; Harriette, June 20, 1886; and Cyrus Minor, May 29, 1899. The first two were born in Galesburg, the last three in Peoria. George Luzerne Avery is still connected with the Avery Company as its secretary. The enterprise is now a business of mammoth proportions and includes the manufacture of agricultural implements, farm wagons, engines, threshers, engine gang plows, gas tractors and city and farm trucks. While the factory and main office are at Peoria, branch houses are maintained at Omaha, Nebraska ; Des Moines, Iowa ; Minneapolis, Minnesota; Fargo, North Dakota; Billings, Montana; Kansas City, Missouri ; Indianapolis, Indiana ; St. Louis, Missouri ; Grand Forks, North Dakota ; Sioux Falls, South Dakota ; and Aberdeen, South Dakota.

The family circle was broken by death, when on the 15th of September, 1905, in Galesburg, Cyrus M. Avery passed away. His life record has been a credit and honor to the city which had ever honored and respected him. His business career was notable by reason of its successful achievement and the extent of the concern which was developed through the enterprise and under the able direction of himself and brother. He seemed to possess a faculty for devising and executing the right thing at the right time and this was joined to every day common sense. He seemed easily to discriminate between the essential and the non-essential, to see the possibility for the coordination of forces and to use each opportunity to the best advantage. Method and system were ever features of the business, together with the employment of skilled and expert workmen. In matters of judgment Mr. Avery was seldom if ever at fault and what he accomplished represented the fit utilization of the innate powers and talents which were his. As prosperity came to him he continually reached out a helping hand to those less fortunate and his benevolence was manifest in generous support of many worthy public projects and charities. Something of his position in the city of his birth is indicated in the fact that at his demise the year book of Knox College for 1907 bore the following inscription:

"To the memory of
Cyrus Minor Avery,
honored alumnus, valued trustee, successful business man, upright and influential citizen ; whose singular nobility of character, loyal friendship and warm-hearted, open-handed generosity, his Alma Mater holds in grateful and loving esteem,
This Book is Dedicated."

This pictured forth the feeling entertained for him not only in Galesburg and in Peoria but wherever he was known and no higher testimonial of his character could be given than the fact that he was most honored where best known.

Perry, Albert. J. (1912) History of Knox County, Illinois. Vol. II. The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, Chicago. pages 30-34

[11196] In 1912 was living in Biloxi, Mississippi.

[10539] A farmer in Kansas.

[10875] Frederick Arthur died when about three years old.

@1 [14697] [S82]

  • @2Page: p. 840
  • @4Data:
    • Date: 13 Jul 2002

@1 [14698] [S451]

    [14699] The State Index gives the marriage date as 01/21/1839. This is probably the date the license was issued.

@1 [14700] [S575]

@1 [10859] [S82]

  • @2Page: p. 489
  • @4Data:
    • Date: 13 Jul 2002

@1 [10860] [S574]

  • @2Page: page 10

@1 [10861] [S552]

  • @2Page: p. 247

@1 [10862] [S575]

@1 [10864] [S451]

  • @2Page: 001/0016

@1 [10865] [S552]

  • @2Page: p. 182

@1 [10939] [S82]

  • @2Page: p. 840
  • @4Data:
    • Date: 13 Jul 2002

@1 [10940] [S575]

@1 [10343] [S82]

  • @2Page: p. 840
  • @4Data:
    • Date: 13 Jul 2002

@1 [10344] [S552]

  • @2Page: p. 182

@1 [10346] [S552]

  • @2Page: p. 788

@1 [10977] [S552]

  • @2Page: p. 182

@1 [10653] [S82]

  • @2Page: p. 840
  • @4Data:
    • Date: 13 Jul 2002

@1 [10742] [S552]

  • @2Page: p. 182

@1 [10743] [S569]

@1 [11197] [S552]

  • @2Page: p. 182

@1 [10540] [S552]

  • @2Page: p. 182

Joseph Wright III / Experience Church

Husband: Joseph Wright III
Born: at:
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Father: Joseph Wright Jr.
Mother: Ruth (Harmon) Hannum
Wife: Experience Church
Born: at:
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Children

Pedigree Chart for: Joseph Wright III

      /--Samuel  Wright  Jr.
   /--Joseph  Wright 
   |  \--Elizabeth  Burt 
/--Joseph  Wright  Jr.
|  |  /--Isaac  Sheldon 
|  \--Ruth  Sheldon 
|     \--Mary  Woodford 
|--Joseph  Wright  III
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Ruth (Harmon)  Hannum 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Experience Church

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Experience  Church 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

David Beale / Susan Anne Sanford

Husband: David Beale
Born: at:
Married: at:  
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Wife: Susan Anne Sanford
Born: at:
Died: at:
Father: Claud Miller Sanford Sr
Mother: Mae Elizabeth Willis
Children
Name: Anna Catherine Beale
Born: at:
Died: at:
Spouses:

Name: Elizabeth Marie Beale
Born: at:
Died: at:
Spouses:


Pedigree Chart for: David Beale

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--David  Beale 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Susan Anne Sanford

      /--Edgar Quinton  Sanford 
   /--Claud  Singleton  Sanford 
   |  \--Lucy Anna  Dunaway 
/--Claud Miller  Sanford  Sr
|  |  /--
|  \--Nina Estelle  Miller 
|     \--
|--Susan Anne  Sanford 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--Mae Elizabeth  Willis 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Jessie C. Diuguid / Susan Bell Buie

Husband: Jessie C. Diuguid
Born: at:
Married: 12 Dec 1878at:
Died: at:
Father: Marshall Nelson Diuguid
Mother: Mary M. Conner
Wife: Susan Bell Buie
Born: at:
Died: at:
Father:
Mother:
Children
Name: Edwin Diuguid
Born: at:
Died: at:
Spouses:


Pedigree Chart for: Jessie C. Diuguid

      /--Alexander  Diuguid 
   /--George E.  Diuguid 
   |  \--Mary  Moss 
/--Marshall Nelson  Diuguid 
|  |  /--William  Diuguid  III
|  \--Elizabeth  Diuguid 
|     \--Lucy  Patteson 
|--Jessie C.  Diuguid 
|     /--
|  /--(--?--)  Conner 
|  |  \--
\--Mary M.  Conner 
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

Pedigree Chart for: Susan Bell Buie

      /--
   /--
   |  \--
/--
|  |  /--
|  \--
|     \--
|--Susan Bell  Buie 
|     /--
|  /--
|  |  \--
\--
   |  /--
   \--
      \--

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